Next Article in Journal
Increased Expression of the Leptin Gene in Adipose Tissue of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease–The Possible Role of an Abnormal Serum Fatty Acid Profile
Previous Article in Journal
Metabolomics to Exploit the Primed Immune System of Tomato Fruit
Previous Article in Special Issue
Metabolic Fingerprint of Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases: A New Diagnostic Perspective
Review

Gut Microbial-Derived Metabolomics of Asthma

1
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14612, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2020, 10(3), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10030097
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 28 February 2020 / Accepted: 2 March 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
In this review, we discuss gut microbial-derived metabolites involved with the origins and pathophysiology of asthma, a chronic respiratory disease that is influenced by the microbiome. Although both gut and airway microbiomes may be important in asthma development, we focus here on the gut microbiome and metabolomic pathways involved in immune system ontogeny. Metabolite classes with existing evidence that microbial-derived products influence asthma risk include short chain fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and bile acids. While tryptophan metabolites and sphingolipids have known associations with asthma, additional research is needed to clarify the extent to which the microbiome contributes to the effects of these metabolites on asthma. These metabolite classes can influence immune function in one of two ways: (i) promoting growth or maturity of certain immune cell populations or (ii) influencing antigenic load by enhancing the number or species of specific bacteria. A more comprehensive understanding of how gut microbes and metabolites interact to modify asthma risk and morbidity will pave the way for targeted diagnostics and treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiome; metabolomics; asthma; short chain fatty acids; polyunsaturated fatty acids; bile acids; tryptophan; sphingolipids microbiome; metabolomics; asthma; short chain fatty acids; polyunsaturated fatty acids; bile acids; tryptophan; sphingolipids
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee-Sarwar, K.A.; Lasky-Su, J.; Kelly, R.S.; Litonjua, A.A.; Weiss, S.T. Gut Microbial-Derived Metabolomics of Asthma. Metabolites 2020, 10, 97. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10030097

AMA Style

Lee-Sarwar KA, Lasky-Su J, Kelly RS, Litonjua AA, Weiss ST. Gut Microbial-Derived Metabolomics of Asthma. Metabolites. 2020; 10(3):97. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10030097

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee-Sarwar, Kathleen A., Jessica Lasky-Su, Rachel S. Kelly, Augusto A. Litonjua, and Scott T. Weiss 2020. "Gut Microbial-Derived Metabolomics of Asthma" Metabolites 10, no. 3: 97. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10030097

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop