Special Issue "Milk Nutraceutical Proteins and Peptides in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X). This special issue belongs to the section "Translational Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Antonini
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Guest Editor
Department of Science, Roma Tre University, viale G. Marconi 446, 00146 Rome, and Interuniversity Consortium Biostructures and Biosystems National Institute (INBB), 00136 Rome, Italy
Interests: molecular mechanisms of metabolic control in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and their biotechnological applications on microbial detection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesco Giansanti
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Guest Editor
Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila. Piazzale Salvatore Tommasi 1, 67100 Coppito (AQ) and Interuniversity Consortium Biostructures and Biosystems National Institute (INBB), 00136 Rome, Italy.
Interests: transferrins; lactoferrin; ovotransferrin; saporin; ADCs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutraceuticals (fusion of: “nutrition” and “pharmaceuticals”) are bioactive molecules derived from food, which provide prevention and treatment of diseases. Either small organic molecules or proteins and peptides derived from both animal and vegetal sources may be nutraceuticals, which may be present in conventional food or may be added as nutritional supplements to the diet. Nutraceuticals have recently received considerable interest due to their pharmacological effects and because they are perceived as safe and less likely to have side effects. For these reasons, their market is growing fast around the world.

The purpose of this Special Issue entitled "Milk Nutraceutical Proteins and Peptides in Health and Disease" is to provide new insights and comprehensively review the data from basic and clinical research to discuss the benefits as well as potential side effects of milk proteins and their peptides both in preventing and treating several human pathologies. Topics are focused on nutraceuticals/supplements analysis, intake, absorption and metabolism, cell signaling, gene expression, and difference in cellular effects. The overall goal of this Special Issue is to present readers with high-quality scientific evidence for the use of nutraceuticals as dietary supplements or functional foods that can be properly used to improve physical wellness in health and disease.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Antonini
Dr. Francesco Giansanti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Milk
  • Nutraceuticals proteins
  • Nutraceutical peptides
  • Functional foods
  • Nutritional supplements
  • in vitro and in vivo studies
  • Clinical trials

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Post-Delivery Milking Delay Influence on the Effect of Oral Supplementation with Bovine Colostrum as Measured with Intestinal Permeability Test
Medicina 2020, 56(10), 495; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56100495 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
Background and objective: The health supplement bovine colostrum reportedly improves immunity and regulates intestinal homeostasis. Reliable assessment methods are needed to ensure the satisfactory biological activity of all marketed colostrum products. Of the well-established effects of colostrum use, the restoration of appropriate intestinal [...] Read more.
Background and objective: The health supplement bovine colostrum reportedly improves immunity and regulates intestinal homeostasis. Reliable assessment methods are needed to ensure the satisfactory biological activity of all marketed colostrum products. Of the well-established effects of colostrum use, the restoration of appropriate intestinal permeability assessed with the lactulose/mannitol (L/M) differential sugar absorption test upon supplementation with colostrum has been consistently observed. Milking time after delivery is one of the factors that influences the composition of bovine colostrum, which causes a rapid decrease in bioactive components. Materials and methods: We use the L/M test to evaluate the intestinal permeability reduction upon supplementation with colostrum (2 × 500 mg) harvested at various times after delivery (2, 24, and 72 h) or a placebo (whey). In our randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) trial, 31 healthy athletes were divided into four groups and assessed at baseline and after the intervention. Results: The trial revealed that only colostrum collected after 2 h and 24 h caused a significant reduction of intestinal permeability. The comparison of post-intervention vs. baseline Δ values produced statistically significant results for 2 h colostrum versus the placebo and 72 h colostrum groups. Conclusions: We conclude that the change of bovine colostrum composition over the first three days of lactation is accompanied by a decrease in its biological activity as measured with the L/M test. This test may offer a biological quality measure for colostrum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk Nutraceutical Proteins and Peptides in Health and Disease)
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