The Therapeutic Landscapes and Patient Management in Psychiatry and Mental Health

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychiatry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1605

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: affective disorders; psychotic disorders; anxiety; public health management; cognitive disorders; implications of neurodevelopmental disorders; comorbidities in psychiatry

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Hospital of Psychiatry and Neurology Brașov, Transilvania University of Brașov, Brașov, Romania
Interests: schizophrenia; affective disorders; dementia; psychopharmacology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We believe that the introduction of a new Special Issue that focuses on mental health is crucial given the difficulties that the healthcare system is facing due to the rising prevalence of mental health disorders in patients with both acute and chronic illnesses.

A mental illness not only causes disruptions in the family but also society. Since psychiatry has developed alongside technological advancement, chronic disorders can now be treated with monotherapy.

Revolutionary chemicals reported to have fewer negative effects are helpful in this regard. Affective disorders and psychotic illnesses need prompt, specialized attention, just like any other chronic pathology, in order to help the patient.

Despite its decreasing relevance, the inherent stigma around psychiatry remains a social concern.

This Special Issue’s goal is to showcase current developments, cutting-edge theories of diagnosis, creative treatment strategies and innovative expectations related to affective, cognitive and psychotic disorders, chronic afflictions and comorbidities in psychiatry.

Dr. Mihnea Costin Manea
Prof. Dr. Petru Ifteni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • affective disorders
  • psychotic illnesses
  • stigma
  • treatment strategies
  • cognitive disorders
  • comorbidities in psychiatry

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1199 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Electroencephalography Neurofeedback for Improving Working Memory and Episodic Memory in the Elderly: A Meta-Analysis
by Yu-Ru Lin, Tien-Wei Hsu, Che-Wei Hsu, Peng-Yu Chen, Ping-Tao Tseng and Chih-Sung Liang
Medicina 2024, 60(3), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60030369 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1237
Abstract
Background and Objective: Existing evidence indicates the potential benefits of electroencephalography neurofeedback (NFB) training for cognitive function. This study aims to comprehensively review all available evidence investigating the effectiveness of NFB on working memory (WM) and episodic memory (EM) in the elderly [...] Read more.
Background and Objective: Existing evidence indicates the potential benefits of electroencephalography neurofeedback (NFB) training for cognitive function. This study aims to comprehensively review all available evidence investigating the effectiveness of NFB on working memory (WM) and episodic memory (EM) in the elderly population. Material and Methods: A systematic search was conducted across five databases to identify clinical trials examining the impact of NFB on memory function in healthy elderly individuals or those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The co-primary outcomes focused on changes in WM and EM. Data synthesis was performed using a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Fourteen clinical trials (n = 284) were included in the analysis. The findings revealed that NFB was associated with improved WM (k = 11, reported as Hedges’ g = 0.665, 95% confidence [CI] = 0.473 to 0.858, p < 0.001) and EM (k = 12, 0.595, 0.333 to 0.856, p < 0.001) in the elderly, with moderate effect sizes. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that NFB had a positive impact on both WM and EM, not only in the healthy population (WM: k = 7, 0.495, 0.213 to 0.778, p = 0.001; EM: k = 6, 0.729, 0.483 to 0.976, p < 0.001) but also in those with MCI (WM: k = 6, 0.812, 0.549 to 1.074, p < 0.001; EM: k = 6, 0.503, 0.088 to 0.919, p = 0.018). Additionally, sufficient training time (totaling more than 300 min) was associated with a significant improvement in WM (k = 6, 0.743, 0.510 to 0.976, p < 0.001) and EM (k = 7, 0.516, 0.156 to 0.876, p = 0.005); however, such benefits were not observed in groups with inadequate training time. Conclusions: The results suggest that NFB is associated with enhancement of both WM and EM in both healthy and MCI elderly individuals, particularly when adequate training time (exceeding 300 min) is provided. These findings underscore the potential of NFB in dementia prevention or rehabilitation. Full article
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