Special Issue "Non-motor Disorders in Parkinson Disease and Other Parkinsonian Syndromes"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 May 2023 | Viewed by 1702

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anastasia Bougea
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1st Department of Neurology, Memory & Movement Disorder Clinic, Eginition Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: Parkinsonian syndromes; dementias and biomarkers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Efthalia Angelopoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1st Department of Neurology, Memory & Movement Disorder Clinic, Eginition Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: Parkinson disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common multi-systemic neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a broad spectrum of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). Atypical Parkinsonism is a less common group of sporadic, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, but more severe than PD. The most common forms are multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Neuroanatomically, NMS may be subdivided into cortical manifestations (psychosis and cognitive impairment), basal ganglia symptoms (impulse control disorders, apathy, and restlessness or akathisia), brainstem symptoms (depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders), and the peripheral nervous system disturbances (orthostatic hypotension (OH), constipation, pain) and sensory disturbances. NMS is often overlooked by physicians and dismissed by patients making their management difficult, with a major burden for patients and caregivers. Unfortunately, there is very little existing data about NMS, their neurobiology, their potential biomarkers, their monitoring, and their treatment. Moreover, there is a growing evidence of accurate monitoring of NMS by wearables sensors for PD. It is, therefore, essential that researchers and practitioners comprehensively address the factors related to NMS in order to improve quality of life for PD patients.

The aim of this Special Issue is to welcome research articles, opinion/perspective articles, and review articles (narrative review, systematic review, meta-analysis), as well as preclinical studies with animal models.

 All the articles will be subject to peer review to ensure quality publications.

Dr. Anastasia Bougea
Dr. Efthalia Angelopoulou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Parkinson’s disease (PD)
  • non-motor symptoms
  • atypical Parkinsonism
  • genetics
  • biomarkers
  • wearables sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Impact of Depression on Cognitive Function and Disease Severity in Idiopathic Cervical Dystonia Patients: One-Center Data in Cross-Sectional Study
Medicina 2022, 58(12), 1793; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina58121793 - 05 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Background: Cervical dystonia is a highly disabling hyperkinetic movement disorder with a lot of nonmotor symptoms. One symptom with a high prevalence is depression, which may negatively affect dystonia patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of depression on [...] Read more.
Background: Cervical dystonia is a highly disabling hyperkinetic movement disorder with a lot of nonmotor symptoms. One symptom with a high prevalence is depression, which may negatively affect dystonia patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of depression on disease severity and cognitive functions in cervical dystonia patients. Methods: Patients with cervical dystonia were interviewed and divided into two groups, based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9: those with no depression or mild depressive features and those with moderate, moderately severe, and severe depression. The severity of dystonia and cognitive functions were assessed and compared in both groups. Results: A total of 52 patients were investigated. Self-assessment of the disease was more negative in clinically significant depressive signs group (p = 0.004), with a tendency for patients with clinically significant depressive features to have a slightly higher score on objective dystonia scales (TSUI and TWSTRS), but without statistically significant differences (p = 0.387 and p = 0.244, respectively). Although not statistically significant, a slightly higher MoCA scale score was registered in cervical dystonia patients with clinically insignificant depressive signs. There was a tendency for worse results in the abstraction category in patients with clinically significant depression (p = 0.056). Conclusions: Patients with clinically significant depression have a more negative self-assessment of the disease and perform worse in abstraction tasks. Full article
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Review

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Review
Ambiental Factors in Parkinson’s Disease Progression: A Systematic Review
Medicina 2023, 59(2), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina59020294 (registering DOI) - 05 Feb 2023
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Abstract
Background and Objectives: So far, there is little evidence of the ambient effect on motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD). This systematic review aimed to determine the association between ambiental factors and the progression of PD. Materials and Methods: A [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: So far, there is little evidence of the ambient effect on motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD). This systematic review aimed to determine the association between ambiental factors and the progression of PD. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search of PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and Web of Science was conducted up to 21 December 2021 according the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: Eight articles were used in the analyses. Long-term exposure to fine particles (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) was positively associated with disease aggravation in two studies. Short-term PM2.5 exposure was positively associated with disease aggravation in three studies. Significant associations were found between PD aggravation and NO2, SO2, CO, nitrate and organic matter (OM) concentrations in two studies. Associations were more pronounced, without reaching statistical significance however, in women, patients over 65 years old and cold temperatures. A 1% increase in temperature was associated with a significant 0.18% increase in Levodopa Equivalent Dose (LED). Ultraviolet light and humidity were not significantly associated with an increase in LED. There was no difference in hallucination severity with changing seasons. There was no evidence for seasonal fluctuation in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Conclusions: There is a link between air pollutants and temperature for PD progression, but this has yet to be proven. More longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm these findings. Full article
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Review
Migraine, Tension-Type Headache and Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Medicina 2022, 58(11), 1684; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina58111684 - 20 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Background and Objectives: The relationship between migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is controversial, while a common pathophysiological link remains obscure. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the association between PD, migraine and TTH. Materials and [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The relationship between migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is controversial, while a common pathophysiological link remains obscure. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the association between PD, migraine and TTH. Materials and Methods: Following PRISMA, we searched MEDLINE, WebofScience, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov up to 1 July 2022 for observational studies examining the prevalence and/or associations of PD with migraine and TTH. We pooled proportions, standardized mean differences (SMD) and odds ratios (OR) with random effects models. The risk of bias was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (PROSPERO CRD42021273238). Results: Out of 1031 screened studies, 12 were finally included in our review (median quality score 6/9). The prevalence of any headache among PD patients was estimated at 49.1% (760 PD patients; 95% CI 24.8–73.6), migraine prevalence at 17.2% (1242 PD patients; 95% CI 9.9–25.9), while 61.5% (316 PD patients; 95% CI 52.6–70.1) of PD patients with migraine reported headache improvement after PD onset. Overall, migraine was not associated with PD (302,165 individuals; ORpooled = 1.11; 95% CI 0.72–1.72).However, cohort studies demonstrated a positive association of PD among lifetime migraineurs (143,583 individuals; ORpooled = 1.54, 95% CI 1.28–1.84), while studies on 12-month migraine prevalence yielded an inverse association (5195 individuals; ORpooled = 0.64, 95% CI 0.43–0.97). Similar findings were reported by 3 studies with data on the TTH-PD relationship (high prevalence, positive association when examined prospectively and an inverse relationship on 12-month prevalence). These data were not quantitatively synthesized due to methodological differences among the studies. Finally, PD patients suffering from any headache had a lower motor unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS) score (503 PD patients; SMD −0.39; 95% CI −0.57 to −0.21) compared to PD patients not reporting headache. There is an unclear association of headaches in genetic PD cohorts. Conclusions: Observational data suggest that migraine and TTH could be linked to PD, but the current literature is conflicting. Full article
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