Special Issue "Geosynthetics in Civil and Environmental Engineering"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 April 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Andy Fourie
Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering, The University of Western Australia (M051), 35 Stirling Highway, CRAWLEY WA 6009, Australia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geosynthetics have been in use in civil and environmental engineering for more than three decades. The benefits of geosynthetics are now widely acknowledged and they find applications in a range of industries. Applications in which these materials are being used are also becoming increasingly more challenging, e.g. higher mechanically stabilised earth walls, containment of extremely aggressive chemicals or wastes, and exposure to more challenging climatic conditions, such as arctic climates. The increasing size of the market for implementation of geosynthetic solutions also means that new products are continuously being introduced to the market. Given this background, it is now opportune to reflect on the successful implementation of geosynthetics, particularly examples where successful long-term performance has been demonstrated. This is particularly important in parts of the world where some regulators limit, or even prohibit the use of geosynthetics in some applications because of concerns about durability and long-term performance. There is thus the need to collect examples of applications in which satisfactory long-term performance has been demonstrated.
This Special Issue aims to document examples of proven successful use of geosynthetics in a range of industries and applications. We therefore cordially invite original research and review articles on a wide range of different applications, such as landfills, mine waste storage, transport infrastructure and environmental protection and clean-up, amongst others where successful long-term performance has been demonstrated. Case studies, with supporting documentation are particularly sought, although descriptions of new or novel testing techniques for evaluating likely long-term performance are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Andy Fourie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Geosynthetics
  • Landfills
  • Waste
  • Transport
  • Infrastructure
  • Durability
  • Environmental Protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Investigations on the Pull-Out Behavior of Tire Strips Reinforced Sands
Materials 2017, 10(7), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10070707 - 27 Jun 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
Waste tires have excellent mechanical performance and have been used as reinforcing material in geotechnical engineering; however, their interface properties are poorly understood. To further our knowledge, this paper examines the pull-out characteristics of waste tire strips in a compacted sand, together with [...] Read more.
Waste tires have excellent mechanical performance and have been used as reinforcing material in geotechnical engineering; however, their interface properties are poorly understood. To further our knowledge, this paper examines the pull-out characteristics of waste tire strips in a compacted sand, together with uniaxial and biaxial geogrids also tested under the same conditions. The analysis of the results shows that the interlocking effect and pull-out resistance between the tire strip and the sand is very strong and significantly higher than that of the geogrids. In the early stages of the pull-out test, the resistance is mainly provided by the front portion of the embedded tire strips, as the pull-out test continues, more and more of the areas towards the end of the tire strips are mobilized, showing a progressive failure mechanism. The deformations are proportional to the frictional resistance between the tire-sand interface, and increase as the normal stresses increase. Tire strips of different wear intensities were tested and presented different pull-out resistances; however, the pull-out resistance mobilization patterns were generally similar. The pull-out resistance values obtained show that rubber reinforcement can provide much higher pull-out forces than the geogrid reinforcements tested here, showing that waste tires are an excellent alternative as a reinforcing system, regardless of the environmental advantages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geosynthetics in Civil and Environmental Engineering)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Modeling Stone Columns
Materials 2017, 10(7), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10070782 - 11 Jul 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geosynthetics in Civil and Environmental Engineering)
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