Special Issue "The Bone–Implant Interface across Multiple Length Scales"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Furqan A. Shah
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Göteborg, Sweden
Interests: bone; implant; biomaterials; tissue engineering; scaffold; collagen; apatite; osteoblast; osteocyte; bone remodeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bone is a complex biological system that exhibits a functionally-optimized, multiscale architecture, where repeating subunits at different length scales, from nano- to macro-, assemble into progressively larger structures. The bone-implant interface is a wide zone where various intricate physical and chemical interactions occur between a constantly adapting physiological system surrounding an inanimate, bone-anchored implant.

This Special Issue of Materials, “The Bone-Implant Interface across Multiple Length Scales”, highlights the structure–function relationships and biomechanical aspects of the interface between bone and bone-repair biomaterials for use in orthopedics and dentistry. Advancement in 3D printing technologies for biocompatible materials including glasses, ceramics, polymers, and metals/alloys has been a major driving force in the evolution of physicochemically and mechanically tailored, application-specific implant designs. Long-term in vivo performance of implant biomaterials may be enhanced through novel design parameters that support continued bone remodeling in addition to stimulating the initial osteogenic response.

Macro-to-micrometer scale porosity for osteonal/lamellar bone ingrowth, combined micro-/nanoscale topography for improved mechanical anchorage, surface-immobilized biomolecules and therapeutic agents, compositions that undergo degradation/resorption under physiological conditions, and cell-based tissue engineering strategies offer their advantages. Here, the spotlight is on recent developments, challenges, and future directions in understanding the truly hierarchical nature of the bone-implant interface.

Dr. Furqan A. Shah
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bone
  • implant
  • biomaterials
  • tissue engineering
  • scaffold
  • collagen
  • apatite
  • osteoblast
  • osteocyte
  • bone remodeling

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Relationship between the Surface Roughness of Biodegradable Mg-Based Bulk Metallic Glass and the Osteogenetic Ability of MG63 Osteoblast-Like Cells
Materials 2020, 13(5), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13051188 - 06 Mar 2020
Abstract
Mg-based bulk metallic glass materials have been investigated for their large potential for application in orthopedic implants due to their biocompatibility, low degradation rate, and osteogenetic ability. As an orthopedic implant, initial cell adhesion has been a critical issue for subsequent osteogenesis and [...] Read more.
Mg-based bulk metallic glass materials have been investigated for their large potential for application in orthopedic implants due to their biocompatibility, low degradation rate, and osteogenetic ability. As an orthopedic implant, initial cell adhesion has been a critical issue for subsequent osteogenesis and bone formation because the first contact between cells and the implant occurs upon the implants surface. Here, we aimed to create Mg-based bulk metallic glass samples with three different surface roughness attributes in order to understand the degradation behavior of Mg-based bulk metallic glass and the adhesion ability and osteogenetic ability of the contact cells. It was found that the degradation behavior of Mg66Zn29Ca5 bulk metallic glass was not affected by surface roughness. The surface of the Mg66Zn29Ca5 bulk metallic glass samples polished via #800 grade sandpaper was found to offer a well-attached surface and to provide a good cell viability environment for Human MG63 osteoblast-like cell line. In parallel, more calcium and mineral deposition was investigated on extracellular matrix with higher surface roughness that verify the relationship between surface roughness and cell performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Bone–Implant Interface across Multiple Length Scales)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop