Special Issue "Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 11300

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Xavier Just-Baringo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Barcelona, Spain
Dr. Sara M. Soto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hospital Clínic-Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biofilms; new antibacterial agents; antimicrobial resistance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The growing prevalence of multiresistant microbes is a global threat that could lead to millions of deaths every year in the coming decades. While old drugs become inefficient and the management of last resort antibiotics turns more challenging, there is a lack of new classes of compounds entering the pipeline.

The vast biodiversity of the world’s oceans and seas is a colossal, yet understudied, source of structural richness. Discovering new chemical entities, genes, and organisms is only the first stage of a variety of strategies to develop new therapies and discover new targets.

In this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, we will welcome contributions dealing with the different approaches to the discovery of new antimicrobial compounds, new targets, and in general, the development of strategies to fight the appearance of resistances.

Dr. Xavier Just-Baringo
Dr. Sara M. Soto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine natural products
  • antibiotics
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • organic synthesis
  • isolation
  • structure elucidation
  • genome mining
  • mutagenesis
  • biosynthesis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Microalgae and Cyanobacteria Strains as Producers of Lipids with Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(12), 675; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19120675 - 27 Nov 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2032
Abstract
Lipids are one of the primary metabolites of microalgae and cyanobacteria, which enrich their utility in the pharmaceutical, feed, cosmetic, and chemistry sectors. This work describes the isolation, structural elucidation, and the antibiotic and antibiofilm activities of diverse lipids produced by different microalgae [...] Read more.
Lipids are one of the primary metabolites of microalgae and cyanobacteria, which enrich their utility in the pharmaceutical, feed, cosmetic, and chemistry sectors. This work describes the isolation, structural elucidation, and the antibiotic and antibiofilm activities of diverse lipids produced by different microalgae and cyanobacteria strains from two European collections (ACOI and LEGE-CC). Three microalgae strains and one cyanobacteria strain were selected for their antibacterial and/or antibiofilm activity after the screening of about 600 strains carried out under the NoMorFilm European project. The total organic extracts were firstly fractionated using solid phase extraction methods, and the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration against an array of human pathogens were determined. The isolation was carried out by bioassay-guided HPLC-DAD purification, and the structure of the isolated molecules responsible for the observed activities was determined by HPLC-HRESIMS and NMR methods. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosylmonoacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosylmonoacylglycerol, α-linolenic acid, hexadeca-4,7,10,13-tetraenoic acid (HDTA), palmitoleic acid, and lysophosphatidylcholine were found among the different active sub-fractions selected. In conclusion, cyanobacteria and microalgae produce a great variety of lipids with antibiotic and antibiofilm activity against the most important pathogens causing severe infections in humans. The use of these lipids in clinical treatments alone or in combination with antibiotics may provide an alternative to the current treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds)
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Article
Expression of Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor Isoform 3 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Showing High Antimicrobial Activity
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050239 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1621
Abstract
Antimicrobial peptides are a class of proteins with antibacterial functions. In this study, the anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 gene (ALFPm3), encoding an antimicrobial peptide from Penaeus monodon with a super activity was expressed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which would develop a [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial peptides are a class of proteins with antibacterial functions. In this study, the anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 gene (ALFPm3), encoding an antimicrobial peptide from Penaeus monodon with a super activity was expressed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which would develop a microalga strain that can be used for the antimicrobial peptide production. To construct the expression cluster, namely pH2A-Pm3, the codon optimized ALFPm3 gene was fused with the ble reporter by 2A peptide and inserted into pH124 vector. The glass-bead method was performed to transform pH2A-Pm3 into C. reinhardtii CC-849. In addition to 8 μg/mL zeocin resistance selection, the C. reinhardtii transformants were further confirmed by genomic PCR and RT-PCR. Western blot analysis showed that the C. reinhardtii-derived ALFPm3 (cALFPm3) was successfully expressed in C. reinhardtii transformants and accounted for 0.35% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Furthermore, the results of antibacterial assay revealed that the cALFPm3 could significantly inhibit the growth of a variety of bacteria, including both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria at a concentration of 0.77 μM. Especially, the inhibition could last longer than 24 h, which performed better than ampicillin. Hence, this study successfully developed a transgenic C. reinhardtii strain, which can produce the active ALFPm3 driven from P. monodon, providing a potential strategy to use C. reinhardtii as the cell factory to produce antimicrobial peptides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds)
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Article
Structural Similarities between Some Common Fluorophores Used in Biology, Marketed Drugs, Endogenous Metabolites, and Natural Products
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(11), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18110582 - 23 Nov 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1767
Abstract
It is known that at least some fluorophores can act as ‘surrogate’ substrates for solute carriers (SLCs) involved in pharmaceutical drug uptake, and this promiscuity is taken to reflect at least a certain structural similarity. As part of a comprehensive study seeking the [...] Read more.
It is known that at least some fluorophores can act as ‘surrogate’ substrates for solute carriers (SLCs) involved in pharmaceutical drug uptake, and this promiscuity is taken to reflect at least a certain structural similarity. As part of a comprehensive study seeking the ‘natural’ substrates of ‘orphan’ transporters that also serve to take up pharmaceutical drugs into cells, we have noted that many drugs bear structural similarities to natural products. A cursory inspection of common fluorophores indicates that they too are surprisingly ‘drug-like’, and they also enter at least some cells. Some are also known to be substrates of efflux transporters. Consequently, we sought to assess the structural similarity of common fluorophores to marketed drugs, endogenous mammalian metabolites, and natural products. We used a set of some 150 fluorophores along with standard fingerprinting methods and the Tanimoto similarity metric. Results: The great majority of fluorophores tested exhibited significant similarity (Tanimoto similarity > 0.75) to at least one drug, as judged via descriptor properties (especially their aromaticity, for identifiable reasons that we explain), by molecular fingerprints, by visual inspection, and via the “quantitative estimate of drug likeness” technique. It is concluded that this set of fluorophores does overlap with a significant part of both the drug space and natural products space. Consequently, fluorophores do indeed offer a much wider opportunity than had possibly been realised to be used as surrogate uptake molecules in the competitive or trans-stimulation assay of membrane transporter activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds)
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Article
Pyridine-2,6-Dithiocarboxylic Acid and Its Metal Complexes: New Inhibitors of New Delhi Metallo -Lactamase-1
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(6), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18060295 - 02 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1700
Abstract
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae continue to threaten human health worldwide with few effective treatment options. New Delhi metallo--lactamase (NDM) enzymes are a contributing element that drive resistance to many -lactam- and carbapenem-based antimicrobials. Many NDM inhibitors are known, yet none are clinically viable. In this [...] Read more.
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae continue to threaten human health worldwide with few effective treatment options. New Delhi metallo--lactamase (NDM) enzymes are a contributing element that drive resistance to many -lactam- and carbapenem-based antimicrobials. Many NDM inhibitors are known, yet none are clinically viable. In this study, we present and characterize a new class of NDM-1 inhibitors based on a pyridine-2,6-dithiocarboxylic acid metal complex scaffold. These complexes display varied and unique activity profiles against NDM-1 in kinetic assays and serve to increase the effectiveness of meropenem, an established antibacterial, in assays using clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds)
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Review

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Review
Antimicrobials from Seaweeds for Food Applications
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(4), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19040211 - 11 Apr 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3745
Abstract
The exponential growth of emerging multidrug-resistant microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens affecting the shelf-life and quality of foods, has recently increased the needs of the food industry to search for novel, natural and eco-friendly antimicrobial agents. Macroalgae are a bio-diverse group distributed worldwide, known [...] Read more.
The exponential growth of emerging multidrug-resistant microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens affecting the shelf-life and quality of foods, has recently increased the needs of the food industry to search for novel, natural and eco-friendly antimicrobial agents. Macroalgae are a bio-diverse group distributed worldwide, known to produce multiple compounds of diverse chemical nature, different to those produced by terrestrial plants. These novel compounds have shown promising health benefits when incorporated into foods, including antimicrobial properties. This review aims to provide an overview of the general methods and novel compounds with antimicrobial properties recently isolated and characterized from macroalgae, emphasizing the molecular pathways of their antimicrobial mechanisms of action. The current scientific evidence on the use of macroalgae or macroalgal extracts to increase the shelf-life of foods and prevent the development of foodborne pathogens in real food products and their influence on the sensory attributes of multiple foods (i.e., meat, dairy, beverages, fish and bakery products) will also be discussed, together with the main challenges and future trends of the use of marine natural products as antimicrobials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance with Marine Antibacterial Compounds)
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