Special Issue "Tangible meets Gestural"

A special issue of Machines (ISSN 2075-1702).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Denis Lalanne
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Human-IST Institute & Department of Informatics, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
Interests: human-computer interaction; multimodal interaction; information visualization; tangible interaction; gestural interaction; affective user interfaces; adaptive user interfaces
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Omar Abou Khaled
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Fribourg, Switzerland
Prof. Dr. Elise Van den Hoven MTD
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Professor in Human-Computer Interaction, School of Software, University of Technology Sydney, 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
2. Associate professor in Interaction Design, Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands
3. Honorary Senior Research Fellow, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
4. Associate Investigator, Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Level 3, Australian Hearing Hub, 16 University Avenue, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
Interests: people-centered design;designing interactive systems;physical interaction design;supporting human remembering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ali Mazalek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Synaesthetic Media Lab, 3 Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada, 4 Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Prof. Dr. Elena Mugellini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Fribourg, Switzerland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Tangible Meets Gestural” is a special issue that aims at comparing tangible interaction, gestural interaction and tangible gesture interaction paradigms. In particular, this special issue aims at investigating how tangible interaction and gestural interaction can be blended into a richer interaction paradigm that exploits at the same time our ability to communicate through gestures and our ability to manipulate objects of the real world. Indeed, tangible gesture interaction is an emerging field that has been defined in 2011 by Mazalek and van den Hoven as the intersection of the field of tangible interaction and gestural interaction [1]. Because of the novelty of the field, many implications for the design of tangible gesture interactive systems are still unexplored and need to be discussed.

Contribution to this special issue is encouraged from different research backgrounds (design, engineering, computing, arts, social sciences, neurosciences, ergonomics, etc.). Submissions are particularly encouraged from, but not limited to, the participants to the 1st International Workshop on Tangible Gesture Interaction, held during the 9th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI 2015).

Appropriate topics for the “Tangible Meets Gestural” special issue include but are not limited to:

- Theory and ground knowledge that frames gestural and tangible interaction

- Application of existing post-WIMP frameworks in tangible and gestural interaction

- Comparison of gestural and tangible interfaces (user performances, cognitive load, fatigue, learnability, skill development etc.) in specific application domains

- Expressivity of tangible and gestural interfaces

- Physical and psychological implications of human senses and skills involved in tangible and gestural interactions

- Feedback and feedforward for tangible and gestural interaction

- Novel applications for tangible gesture interfaces

- Theory, frameworks and future visions on tangible gesture interaction

- Techniques for mixed gesture and object recognition

[1] Hoven, E., Mazalek, A.: Grasping gestures: Gesturing with physical artifacts. Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing. 25, 255–271. (2011)

Prof.Dr. Denis Lalanne
Prof.Dr. Omar Abou Khaled
Dr. Elise van den Hoven
Dr. Ali Mazalek
Prof. Dr. Elena Mugellini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Machines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Awakening the Synthesizer Knob: Gestural Perspectives
Machines 2015, 3(4), 317-338; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines3040317 - 28 Oct 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3198
Abstract
While being the primary mode of interaction with mainstream digital musical instruments, the knob has been greatly overlooked in its potential for innovation. In this paper, we aim to open up the thinking about new possibilities for the knob. Based on an analysis [...] Read more.
While being the primary mode of interaction with mainstream digital musical instruments, the knob has been greatly overlooked in its potential for innovation. In this paper, we aim to open up the thinking about new possibilities for the knob. Based on an analysis of the background of the knob and the relevant theory on interaction, three directives are formulated to guide the design of a new breed of knobs. Six prototypes are tested through an AttrakDiff questionnaire and Discourse Analysis. It is shown that the proposed new breed of knobs has stronger hedonic qualities than knobs of mainstream digital musical instruments, though the pragmatic quality appears lower. The strongest improvement is seen in stimulation, an important factor in enticing investment to play, and as such, more expressive control. Through using three directives, a new generation of knobs can be made that would improve the expressive affordances of digital musical instruments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tangible meets Gestural)
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Article
Vuur: Exploring Shared Interaction with Light
Machines 2015, 3(4), 296-316; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines3040296 - 21 Oct 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2336
Abstract
As LED lighting technology becomes omnipresent, lighting environments become more advanced and allow for adjusting various parameters such as color, brightness, and saturation. This poses challenges for interaction design, particularly when lighting environments are shared between multiple users. This paper presents “Vuur”: a [...] Read more.
As LED lighting technology becomes omnipresent, lighting environments become more advanced and allow for adjusting various parameters such as color, brightness, and saturation. This poses challenges for interaction design, particularly when lighting environments are shared between multiple users. This paper presents “Vuur”: a shared physical interface with which users can control lighting in meeting room environments through gestures on the interface’s surface. A research-through-design exploration involving five variations of an experienceable Vuur prototype revealed that the interface enabled groups of participants to explore, and reach consensus about, shared lighting preferences. The findings are presented in four themes that emerged from qualitative analysis of the performed user studies: lighting needs, continued interaction, peripheral interaction, and shared interface. This early exploration of shared interaction with light lays out opportunities and insights for tangible and gestural interaction in the emerging domain of interactive lighting systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tangible meets Gestural)
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Article
Tangible Cooperative Gestures: Improving Control and Initiative in Digital Photo Sharing
Machines 2015, 3(4), 268-295; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines3040268 - 30 Sep 2015
Viewed by 2311
Abstract
This paper focuses on co-present digital photo sharing on a notebook and investigates how this could be supported. While analyzing the current digital photo sharing situation we noticed that there was a high threshold for visitors to take control of the personal computer [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on co-present digital photo sharing on a notebook and investigates how this could be supported. While analyzing the current digital photo sharing situation we noticed that there was a high threshold for visitors to take control of the personal computer of the photo owner, resulting in inequity of participation. It was assumed that visitors would have the opportunity to interact with the notebook more freely if this threshold was lowered by distributing the user interface and creating a more public, instead of personal, interaction space. This, in turn, could make them feel more involved and in control during a session, creating a more enjoyable experience. To test these assumptions a design prototype was created that stimulates participants to use tangible artifacts for cooperative gestures, a promising direction for the future of HCI. The situation with the cooperative gestures was compared with the regular digital photo sharing situation, which makes use of a keyboard. In dyads, visitors felt more involved and in control in the design prototype cooperative gestures condition (especially during storytelling), resulting in a more enjoyable digital photo sharing experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tangible meets Gestural)
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Article
Move, Hold and Touch: A Framework for Tangible Gesture Interactive Systems
Machines 2015, 3(3), 173-207; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines3030173 - 18 Aug 2015
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4282
Abstract
Technology is spreading in our everyday world, and digital interaction beyond the screen, with real objects, allows taking advantage of our natural manipulative and communicative skills. Tangible gesture interaction takes advantage of these skills by bridging two popular domains in Human-Computer Interaction, tangible [...] Read more.
Technology is spreading in our everyday world, and digital interaction beyond the screen, with real objects, allows taking advantage of our natural manipulative and communicative skills. Tangible gesture interaction takes advantage of these skills by bridging two popular domains in Human-Computer Interaction, tangible interaction and gestural interaction. In this paper, we present the Tangible Gesture Interaction Framework (TGIF) for classifying and guiding works in this field. We propose a classification of gestures according to three relationships with objects: move, hold and touch. Following this classification, we analyzed previous work in the literature to obtain guidelines and common practices for designing and building new tangible gesture interactive systems. We describe four interactive systems as application examples of the TGIF guidelines and we discuss the descriptive, evaluative and generative power of TGIF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tangible meets Gestural)
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