Special Issue "Mapping the Tribology Mundi: Interactions with Global Corrosion Issues"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022 | Viewed by 3638

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Margaret Stack
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose St., Glasgow G1 1XJ, UK
Interests: interactions of solid particle erosion and wear of materials in corrosive environments with specific emphasis on the development of mapping techniques for understanding the mechanisms of materials loss

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We hope you and your family are safe and well in these uncertain times.

We are very pleased to invite you to submit a paper to this Special Issue of Lubricants on “Mapping the Tribology Mundi: Interactions with Global Corrosion Issues”.

This Special Issue will publish papers from leading experts on tribology and tribo-corrosion maps. We will highlight state-of-the-art developments in biomedical (dental and hip joint) and energy fields, including renewable energy. There have been major shifts in the use of green energy in the past 20 years with an increasing proportion of this landscape focused on wind and tidal energy. In the biomedical field, we now have many choices of replacement dental implants, hip joint materials, coatings, and stents. Novel and generic approaches to the development of multi-parameter maps are invited and links between CFD modeling, two-dimensional approaches, and sensors are welcome, to develop smart maps for the use of these techniques in practical environments. Thus, we are particularly keen to attract fundamental ideas and to link interdisciplinary fields to identify novel tools to manipulate and generate and apply such maps. As our horizon has shifted towards understanding coronaviruses in the past 6 months, we welcome any tribological or corrosion mapping approaches involving viral effects on materials.

As well as publishing your paper, Lubricants will also include the Special Issue as part of a book to highlight this important field in Tribology.

We very much hope that you can contribute a paper. If you have any further questions, please let us know.

Prof. Dr. Margaret Stack
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Maps 
  • Tribo-corrosion 
  • Micro-abrasion 
  • Erosion 
  • Sliding wear

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Study of Raindrop Impacts on a Wind Turbine Material: Velocity and Impact Angle Effects on Erosion MAPS at Various Exposure Times
Lubricants 2021, 9(6), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants9060060 - 03 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1061
Abstract
Within renewable energy, challenging climates can impose great limitations on power generation. In wind energy, rain erosion on turbine blades can create major disruptions to air flow over the aerofoil, reducing the efficiency of the blade and immediately affecting the power output of [...] Read more.
Within renewable energy, challenging climates can impose great limitations on power generation. In wind energy, rain erosion on turbine blades can create major disruptions to air flow over the aerofoil, reducing the efficiency of the blade and immediately affecting the power output of the turbine. The defects in the materials that cause these inefficiencies are known and can be observed on turbines that have been in operation for extended periods. This work explores the transitions between different wear states for G10 Epoxy Glass under laboratory simulated wind turbine conditions in operation and measures the wear periodically to identify a progression of erosion. Mass loss data and micrographic analysis revealed samples at 45° and 60° displayed increasing erosion when examining erosion performance for angles between 15° and 90° over various exposure and velocities. Erosion maps were constructed, showing the variation of wastage and identifying the performance window of conditions where degradation is minimised. Full article
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Article
Tribocorrosion Evaluation of Nb2O5, TiO2, and Nb2O5 + TiO2 Coatings for Medical Applications
Lubricants 2021, 9(5), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants9050049 - 01 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 753
Abstract
Materials used in biomedicine for purposes of long-time stay inside the body presents diverse sort of problems like cytotoxicity, wear, biocompatibility, and ion liberation along time. This paper presents the characterization of corrosion-wear combined phenomena on Nb2O5, TiO2 [...] Read more.
Materials used in biomedicine for purposes of long-time stay inside the body presents diverse sort of problems like cytotoxicity, wear, biocompatibility, and ion liberation along time. This paper presents the characterization of corrosion-wear combined phenomena on Nb2O5, TiO2, and Nb2O5 + TiO2 coatings with future applications as biomaterials. After the films’ production process using magnetron sputtering technique, they were characterized through an optic, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopy to evaluate their morphology, structure, and surface damage suffered by the synergy between wear and corrosion phenomena. The life in service of the implant was evaluated in terms of the coating behavior against inside body conditions like charge, wear, and electrochemical degradation. This test was made with electrochemical measurements in simulated biological fluid combined with the wear characterization implementing a potentiostat and a tribometer in a linear wear configuration with a bone pin. As a result, the different electrochemical responses of the films were evidenced by polarization curves and equivalent circuits of the systems. The coefficient of friction and surface degradation were also obtained and evaluated. Comparing the properties of the systems, we conclude that TiO2 coatings have better behavior in terms of the wear-corrosion synergy phenomena while the systems with Nb present pitting corrosion. Full article
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Article
Erosion Mapping of Through-Thickness Toughened Powder Epoxy Gradient Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Plates for Tidal Turbine Blades
Lubricants 2021, 9(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants9030022 - 25 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
Erosion of tidal turbine blades in the marine environment is a major material challenge due to the high thrust and torsional loading at the rotating surfaces, which limits the ability to harness energy from tidal sources. Polymer–matrix composites can exhibit leading-blade edge erosion [...] Read more.
Erosion of tidal turbine blades in the marine environment is a major material challenge due to the high thrust and torsional loading at the rotating surfaces, which limits the ability to harness energy from tidal sources. Polymer–matrix composites can exhibit leading-blade edge erosion due to marine flows containing salt and solid particles of sand. Anti-erosion coatings can be used for more ductility at the blade surface, but the discontinuity between the coating and the stiffer composite can be a site of failure. Therefore, it is desirable to have a polymer matrix with a gradient of toughness, with a tougher, more ductile polymer matrix at the blade surface, transitioning gradually to the high stiffness matrix needed to provide high composite mechanical properties. In this study, multiple powder epoxy systems were investigated, and two were selected to manufacture unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (UD-GFRP) plates with different epoxy ratios at the surface and interior plies, leading to a toughening gradient within the plate. The gradient plates were then mechanically compared to their standard counterparts. Solid particle erosion testing was carried out at various test conditions and parameters on UD-GFRP specimens in a slurry environment. The experiments performed were based on a model of the UK marine environment for a typical tidal energy farm with respect to the concentration of saltwater and the size of solid particle erodent. The morphologies of the surfaces were examined by SEM. Erosion maps were generated based on the result showing significant differences for materials of different stiffness in such conditions. Full article
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