Special Issue "Advances in Polymer Tribology"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Li Chang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Dr. Janet Wong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imeprial College London, London, UK
Prof. Dr. Hung-Jue Sue
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polymer Technology Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past few decades, polymers have been increasingly used in various forms, such as composites, films and coatings in a wide range of applications, offering a lower weight and super energy efficient alternative to the metallic and ceramic materials. A number of these applications, such as seals, bearings and gears demand reduction in friction and wear of polymeric components for better mechanical performance and long service life. Polymer solutions have been proven successful for many tribological applications, especially under dry sliding conditions thanks to their self-lubricating behaviour. Nevertheless, ever-increasing stringent demands in new applications require overcoming new challenges by properly designing and fabricating polymer components with desired tribological performance, especially under harsh environmental conditions, such as erosion, corrosion and high temperature. In view of the importance of polymer tribology in innovation and technological development, this Special Issue aims at offering a major and critical dissemination of the state-of-the-art progresses on polymer tribology. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the polymer tribology research findings are welcome. We are looking forward to receiving your contribution.

Dr. Li Chang
Dr. Janet Wong
Prof. Dr. Hung-Jue Sue
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymer tribology
  • films
  • Coatings
  • Erosion
  • Wear
  • Extreme sliding

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Static and Dynamic Friction of Pure and Friction-Modified PA6 Polymers in Contact with Steel Surfaces: Influence of Surface Roughness and Environmental Conditions
Lubricants 2019, 7(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7020017 - 16 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In the present study, PA6 polymers with and without solid lubricant inclusions were investigated against S1100QL steel surfaces that had different surface roughness values—a very high surface roughness (Rz ≈ 40 µm) and a low surface roughness (Rz [...] Read more.
In the present study, PA6 polymers with and without solid lubricant inclusions were investigated against S1100QL steel surfaces that had different surface roughness values—a very high surface roughness (Rz ≈ 40 µm) and a low surface roughness (Rz ≈ 5 µm). Static and dynamic friction coefficients were analysed under a series of nominal contact pressures (2.5 to 40 N/mm2) considering the influences of polymer water saturation, temperature, counter-body surface roughness and lubrication. Mechanisms for the observed influences of the respective parameters are provided and are interpreted from the view of the adhesive and deformative contributions to the friction force. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymer Tribology)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
An Experimental Study on Starved Grease Lubricated Contacts
Lubricants 2018, 6(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants6030082 - 10 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The film thickness of a ball-on-disc contact lubricated with four greases of different formulations was measured under different operating conditions until starvation. Two polymer-thickened greases and two lithium-thickened greases, formulated with base oils of different nature and/or viscosity, were tested. The central film [...] Read more.
The film thickness of a ball-on-disc contact lubricated with four greases of different formulations was measured under different operating conditions until starvation. Two polymer-thickened greases and two lithium-thickened greases, formulated with base oils of different nature and/or viscosity, were tested. The central film thickness was measured under constant operating conditions (load, temperature, slide-to-roll ratio) varying only the entrainment speed. In a separate test, the film thickness was measured over time with all operating conditions set to constant. Pictures of the film thickness profile across the contact area were also registered. The results were compared with the fully flooded results. The coefficient of friction (COF) was measured in a ball-on-disc contact under equal operating conditions and the results were correlated with the film thickness findings. The different grease formulations and the influence of the operating conditions on the film thickness and COF were discussed. The polymer thickened the greases, promoting lower COF and higher film thickness, especially when there is thickener material crossing the contact which happens quite often for these greases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymer Tribology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in High Performance Polymers—Tribological Aspects
Lubricants 2019, 7(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7010002 - 31 Dec 2018
Abstract
High-performance polymer (HPP)-based engineering materials in tribological applications have been under continuous research over the last few decades. This paper reviewed the recent studies on the sliding wear properties of HPPs and their nanocomposites, which are associated with the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. [...] Read more.
High-performance polymer (HPP)-based engineering materials in tribological applications have been under continuous research over the last few decades. This paper reviewed the recent studies on the sliding wear properties of HPPs and their nanocomposites, which are associated with the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. In particular, the effects of the intrinsic properties of polymer composites (e.g., mechanical properties of the materials and the types of fillers) and external environmental conditions (e.g., service temperature and lubrication medium) on the formation of transfer layers (TLs) were discussed. The latter would govern the overall friction and wear of polymeric materials in sliding against metallic counterparts. In addition, correlations between the basic mechanical properties of HPPs and their sliding wear behavior were also explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymer Tribology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop