Special Issue "Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Professor Andrey I. Dmitriev

Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Academicheskii av. 2/4, Tomsk, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computer simulation; tribology; friction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computer-aided modeling is now gaining more and more implementation in various fields of modern knowledge and science due to development and application of advanced high-performance computing systems. Tribology has not become an exclusion from this trend. In addition to experimental approaches, the computer-aided modeling methods serve now as powerful tools in hands of a modern researcher that allow efficiently finding solutions to various problems in the field of wear and friction.

Given the study object scale factor, the computer-aided modeling methods may be classified into those serving for macroscopic integral description, for mesoscopic inner structure consideration and for nanometer scale studies. The latter ones are becoming now more and more popular among the researchers because of the growing interest to the nanosize object description. On the other hand, along with static and quasi-static description of the contact problems there are such extensively developing approaches as direct dynamics modeling methods. The rationale behind such a variety of the computer-aided modeling methods is the complexity and multi-scale correlation character of wear and friction processes.

This Special Issue will examine current advances and future trends in using various computer-aided modeling methods for resolving the wear and friction problems. Contributions from both academic and industrial researchers are welcome. The accepted papers should either aid obtaining the new knowledge in the field of tribology or provide the insight into developing the new computer-aided modeling approaches and directions promising for resolving problems of wear and friction.

Prof. Dr. Andrey I. Dmitriev
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Fundamental Regularities of the Evolution of Elastic Vortices Generated in the Surface Layers of Solids under Tangential Contact Loading
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 12 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
PDF Full-text (9934 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conventionally discussed dynamic mechanisms of elastic strain energy redistribution in near-contact surface regions include P and S elastic wave pulses radiating from the contact surface. At the same time, the elastic strain energy can be transferred by localized vortex-like elastic waves (Rayleigh, Love,
[...] Read more.
Conventionally discussed dynamic mechanisms of elastic strain energy redistribution in near-contact surface regions include P and S elastic wave pulses radiating from the contact surface. At the same time, the elastic strain energy can be transferred by localized vortex-like elastic waves (Rayleigh, Love, Stoneley wave, and so on). In the paper, we numerically studied the main features of the formation and propagation of localized vortex-like waves in the surface layers under the contact zone. The study was done using the numerical method of movable cellular automata. We showed that the initial phase of dynamic contact interaction with a nonzero tangential component of contact velocity is accompanied by the formation of a so-called elastic vortex. The elastic vortex is a fully dynamic object, which is characterized by shear stress concentration and propagates at the shear wave speed. We first revealed the ability of the elastic vortex to propagate toward the bulk of the material and transfer elastic strain energy deep into the surface layer in a localized manner. We analyzed the dependence of the direction of vortex propagation on the tangential contact velocity, contact pressure and Young’s modulus of the material. The results of the study are important for better understanding the dynamic mechanisms contributing to inelastic strain accumulation or gradual degradation of surface layers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Three-Dimensional DEM Modelling of Ball Bearing with Lubrication Regime Prediction
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
PDF Full-text (9376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper deals with an efficient 3D modelling of a radial ball bearing to predict the operating lubrication regime under mechanical loading and mounting conditions by using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Due to the relevance of such an approach, especially for multicontact
[...] Read more.
This paper deals with an efficient 3D modelling of a radial ball bearing to predict the operating lubrication regime under mechanical loading and mounting conditions by using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Due to the relevance of such an approach, especially for multicontact systems, the lubrication regime associated with specific operating conditions can be predicted accurately. By means of an elastohydrodynamic lubrication formulation depending on parameters related to the size of contact area, mechanical properties of materials, roughness and fluid viscosity, the lubricant film thickness is predicted and used to take into consideration the fluid film damping effect and friction coefficient variation. The lubrication regime can be identified according to Stribeck curve with the assumption of a piezo-viscous-elastic behaviour of the lubricant. The numerical simulations performed with MULTICOR-3D software on an operating ball bearing shown that the lubrication regime at the rolling element-raceway contact can be easily monitored and quantitatively identified. To assess the efficiency of the discrete modelling, a parametric study is carried out in order to exhibit how the operating conditions affect the lubrication regimes and the fluid film spread in the loaded zone. The adequacy between the choice of lubricant and the bearing tribofinition is sought to optimize the component lifetime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Modeling the Friction Boundary Layer of an Entire Brake Pad with an Abstract Cellular Automaton
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 26 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 4 May 2018
PDF Full-text (6236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The principle energy exchange of a brake system occurs in the tribological boundary layer between the pad and the disc. The associated phenomena are primarily responsible for the dynamics of brake systems. The wear debris forms flat contact structures, or “patches,” which carry
[...] Read more.
The principle energy exchange of a brake system occurs in the tribological boundary layer between the pad and the disc. The associated phenomena are primarily responsible for the dynamics of brake systems. The wear debris forms flat contact structures, or “patches,” which carry the majority of the normal load in the system and are highly influential on the friction behavior of the system. A new simulation tool is presented, which is capable of rapidly performing simulations of the contact between an entire brake pad and disc. The “Abstract Cellular Automaton” simulations accurately model the patch coverage state of a brake pad surface based on the system’s load history. This can be used to simulate the complex dissipation phenomena within the tribological contact of the entire pad, including time-dependent local friction coefficients, wear and wear debris transport, and vibrational effects on highly differing scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Sliding Performance of an Amorphous Silica Nano-Layer—The Impact of Chosen Interatomic Potentials
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 3 May 2018
PDF Full-text (5464 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The sliding behavior of an amorphous silica sample between two rigid surfaces is in the focus of the present paper. Molecular Dynamics using a classical Tersoff’s potential and a recently developed ReaxFF potential was applied for simulating sliding within a thin film corresponding
[...] Read more.
The sliding behavior of an amorphous silica sample between two rigid surfaces is in the focus of the present paper. Molecular Dynamics using a classical Tersoff’s potential and a recently developed ReaxFF potential was applied for simulating sliding within a thin film corresponding to a tribofilm formed from silica nanoparticles. The simulations were performed at different temperatures corresponding to moderate and severe tribological stressing conditions. Simulations with both potentials revealed the need of considering different temperatures in order to obtain a sound interpretation of experimental findings. The results show the striking differences between the two potentials not only in terms of magnitude of the resistance stress (about one order of magnitude) but also in terms of friction mechanisms. The expected smooth sliding regime under high temperature conditions was predicted by both simulations, although with Tersoff’s potential smooth sliding was obtained only at the highest temperature. On the other hand, at room temperature Tersoff-style calculations demonstrate stick-slip behavior, which corresponds qualitatively with our experimental findings. Nevertheless, comparison with a macroscopic coefficient of friction is not possible because simulated resistance stresses do not depend on the applied normal pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Simple Prediction Method for Rubber Adhesive Friction by the Combining Friction Test and FE Analysis
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 16 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
PDF Full-text (5034 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the design and development of rubber products, it is important to evaluate the contact load dependency of the friction coefficient. In particular, since the pressure distribution varies depending on the dimensions of sliding bodies and the pattern of the contact surface, a
[...] Read more.
In the design and development of rubber products, it is important to evaluate the contact load dependency of the friction coefficient. In particular, since the pressure distribution varies depending on the dimensions of sliding bodies and the pattern of the contact surface, a simplified and accurate evaluation method that can take these influences into account is desired. In this study, we proposed a prediction method for the adhesive friction between rubber specimens of arbitrary shapes with arbitrary roughness and a smooth hard surface, by combining the: (1) friction theory considering the influence of roughness; (2) basic friction test; and (3) finite element analysis. Further, we verified the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing the predicted results with the measurement results of friction between a hemispherical PDMS specimen and a PMMA flat plate and between a PDMS block specimen with a grooved surface and a flat prism. Results show that the prediction accuracy of the contact load dependency of the friction coefficient is reasonably good. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Extension of One-Dimensional Models for Hyperelastic String Structures under Coulomb Friction with Adhesion
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 2 April 2018 / Accepted: 6 April 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
PDF Full-text (2140 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A stretching behavior of knitted and woven textiles is modeled. In our work, the yarns are modeled as one-dimensional hyperelastic strings with frictional contact. Capstan law known for Coulomb’s friction of yarns is extended to an additional adhesion due to gluing of filaments
[...] Read more.
A stretching behavior of knitted and woven textiles is modeled. In our work, the yarns are modeled as one-dimensional hyperelastic strings with frictional contact. Capstan law known for Coulomb’s friction of yarns is extended to an additional adhesion due to gluing of filaments on the yarn surface or some chemical reaction. Two-step Newton’s method is applied for the solution of the large stretching with sliding evolution in the contact nodes. The approach is illustrated on a hysteresis of knitted textile and on the force-strain curve for a woven pattern and both compared with experimental effective curves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Wear Analysis of a Heterogeneous Annular Cylinder
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 18 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3081 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wear of a cylindrical punch composed by two different materials alternatively distributed in annular forms is studied with the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR). The changes in surface topography and pressure distribution during the wear process is obtained and validated by the boundary
[...] Read more.
Wear of a cylindrical punch composed by two different materials alternatively distributed in annular forms is studied with the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR). The changes in surface topography and pressure distribution during the wear process is obtained and validated by the boundary element method (BEM). The pressure in each annular ring approaches a constant in a stationary state where the surface topography does not change any more. Furthermore, in an easier manner, using direct integration, the limiting profile in a steady wear state is theoretically calculated, as well as the root mean square (RMS) of its surface gradient, which is closely related to the coefficient of friction between this kind of surface and an elastomer. The dependence on the wear coefficients and the width of the annular areas of two phases is obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle An Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian Formulation for Modelling Cavitation in the Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of Line Contacts
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 20 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
PDF Full-text (2382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) formulation for modelling cavitation in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) is derived and applied to line contact geometry. The method is developed in order to locate the position of cavitation onset along the length of the contacting region
[...] Read more.
In this article an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) formulation for modelling cavitation in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) is derived and applied to line contact geometry. The method is developed in order to locate the position of cavitation onset along the length of the contacting region which gives the transition from liquid to vapour in the fluid. The ALE is implemented by introducing a spatial frame of reference in which the solution is required and a material frame of reference in which the governing equations are solved. The spatial frame is moved from the material frame according to the error in the Neumann pressure gradient constraint required at the cavitation location when Dirichlet constraints are imposed for pressure in the liquid phase. Results are calculated under both steady-state and transient operating conditions using a multigrid solver. The solutions obtained are compared to established literature and conventional approaches to modelling cavitation which show that the ALE formulation is an alternative, straightforward and accurate means of implementing such conditions in EHL. This is achieved without the penalties associated with the numerical modelling of Heaviside functions or free boundaries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computer Simulation in Tribology and Friction)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top