Advanced Polymeric and Colloidal Lubricants

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2390

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Oral Sciences, School of Biomedical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
Interests: biolubrication; polymeric lubricants; nanotribology; hydration lubrication; synovial joints; intermolecular and surface forces; biointerfaces; bioinspired materials; biosourced materials
State Key Laboratory of Tribology in Advanced Equipment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: liquid superlubricity; hydration lubrication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past two decades, our understanding of complex intermolecular interactions responsible for friction and wear reduction in mechanical and biomechanical systems has improved significantly. As a result, there has been a burst of novel materials and technologies designed and evaluated to improve efficiency and sustainability of these systems. Three classes of materials especially stand out as novel solutions for friction and wear reduction as they allow precise control of friction forces at the intermolecular scale: (i) polymeric materials and coatings, including biosourced and bioinspired polymers, proteins and peptides as well as synthetic ones, (ii) nanoparticle-based coatings, with novel geometries and surface modifications, either natural or synthetic, and (iii) electrolyte-based lubricating systems, including highly concentrated electrolytes and ionic liquids. 

Our objective in this Special Issue of Lubricants is to provide a platform for you to publish your most recent advances in designing and understanding state-of-the-art polymeric, colloidal and electrolyte-based friction-mediating materials and technologies. We welcome contributions on experimental, theoretical and computer simulation aspects of controlling friction and wear in such materials. We hope that this Special Issue will form a collection of multifaceted articles showcasing the advances in the field of lubricating soft materials. We look forward to reading your notable contributions to this field.

Dr. Vahid Adibnia
Dr. Tianyi Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • friction
  • coating
  • materials
  • biomaterials
  • polymers
  • nanomaterials
  • electrolytes
  • interface science
  • lubricants
  • biolubrication
  • joints
  • cartilage
  • osteoarthritis
  • hydration
  • wear protection
  • drag reduction
  • sustainability
  • tribology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

29 pages, 3112 KiB  
Review
Oral Lubrication, Xerostomia, and Advanced Macromolecular Lubricants for Treatment of Dry Mouth
by William Austin, Maryam Hdeib, Paige Fraser, Maya Goldchtaub, Elika Shams, Tianyi Han, Pierre-Luc Michaud and Vahid Adibnia
Lubricants 2024, 12(4), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12040126 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 328
Abstract
Dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, is a condition in which insufficient or ineffective saliva does not provide sufficient oral lubrication. The severity of this condition can vary from a mild discomfort to a debilitating condition that greatly impairs patients’ lives. Xerostomia arises [...] Read more.
Dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, is a condition in which insufficient or ineffective saliva does not provide sufficient oral lubrication. The severity of this condition can vary from a mild discomfort to a debilitating condition that greatly impairs patients’ lives. Xerostomia arises as a side effect of various medications, diseases, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or nerve damage. Various aqueous dispersions of macromolecules have been proposed to assist or replace the saliva in these patients. It is vital that these macromolecules have ample lubricity and water retention properties while showing long-lasting efficacy. The emphasis of this review is to provide a general overview on lubricating macromolecules that have been clinically used or reported in the literature as potential replacements for saliva. These include various natural or synthetic polymers, proteins, peptides, and lipids that are used in the form of solutions, gels, emulsions, and colloids. Perspectives into the future of macromolecular oral lubricants in the treatment of xerostomia are also provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Polymeric and Colloidal Lubricants)
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22 pages, 9472 KiB  
Review
The Application of Ionic Liquids in the Lubrication Field: Their Design, Mechanisms, and Behaviors
by Mengmeng Liu, Jing Ni, Caixia Zhang, Ruishen Wang, Qiang Cheng, Weihao Liang and Zhifeng Liu
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010024 - 13 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1553
Abstract
Ionic liquids (ILs) are molten organic salts consisting of organic cations and weakly coordinating organic/inorganic anions at room temperature. ILs have excellent physical and chemical properties such as high thermal stability, high combustible temperature, high miscibility with organic compounds and so on, making [...] Read more.
Ionic liquids (ILs) are molten organic salts consisting of organic cations and weakly coordinating organic/inorganic anions at room temperature. ILs have excellent physical and chemical properties such as high thermal stability, high combustible temperature, high miscibility with organic compounds and so on, making them good candidates for high performance lubricants and lubricant additives. The functional designability of ILs makes them novel lubrication materials that can break through the bottleneck of the active control of friction and lubrication. This paper firstly briefly introduces how to design the physical and chemical properties of the ILs required for different friction conditions by bonding specific cations with anions. Then, the lubrication mechanisms of ILs as base lubricants and additives for oils and water are focused on. The correlation between the structure of ILs and the lubrication results are established, which can guide the structural design of ILs in different applications. The response behaviors of friction characteristics under external electric fields are analyzed, which can provide a theoretical basis for the intelligent control of friction based on ILs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Polymeric and Colloidal Lubricants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Characterisation Approaches for Polymer-Based Lubrication Surfaces
Author: Sun
Highlights: 1. Polymer Properties for Lubrication. 2. Advanced Microscopy Techniques. 3. Spectroscopy Methods. 4. Tribological Tests. 5. Challenges in Characterisation. 6. Proposed Solutions. 7. Potential Applications.

Title: Characterisation Approaches for Polymer-Based Lubrication Surfaces
Authors: Yulong Sun
Affiliation: UNSW Sydney
Abstract: In recent years, polymer-based lubrication surfaces have gained significant attention due to their potential in reducing friction and wear in various mechanical systems. This paper delves into the various characterisation approaches employed to study these surfaces. We begin by providing an overview of the fundamental properties of polymers that make them suitable for lubrication applications. Subsequently, we discuss advanced microscopy techniques, spectroscopy methods, and tribological tests that are pivotal in understanding the surface morphology, chemical composition, and functional performance of these lubricants. Special emphasis is placed on the correlation between the microstructure of the polymer and its lubrication properties. The paper also highlights challenges faced in characterising these surfaces and proposes potential solutions. By providing a comprehensive review of the current methodologies, this paper aims to guide researchers in the field of tribology and material science towards a deeper understanding of polymer-based lubrication surfaces and their potential applications.

Title: Electrical potential controlled lubrication with ion-based lub-ricants
Authors: Zhongnan Wang 1, Hui Guo 1, Tianyi Han 2,*, Vahid Adibnia 3, and Chenhui Zhang 2
Affiliation: 1 School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044, China 2 State Key Laboratory of Tribology in Advanced Equipment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China 3 School of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Abstract: Electrical potential controlled lubrication, also known as triboelectrochemistry or electrotunable tribology, is an emerging field to regulate the friction, lubrication, and wear performance by in-fluencing the charge distribution on the solid-liquid interfaces through an applied electric po-tential, and even to achieve superlubrication. It is of great significance for intelligent controllable lubrication, and applications of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and key components in high-end mechanical equipment such as gears and bearings, etc. However, there is little theoretical understanding of the electrical potential controlled lubrication between micro and macro condi-tions; the synergistic contribution of the adsorption/desorption process and the electrochemical reaction process has not been well understood; and there exists a significant gap between the theoretical research and applications of the electrical potential controlled lubrication. Here we provide an overview of this hot field, from introducing its background to the advantages and characteristics of different experimental configurations (including universal mechanical tribo-meters, atomic force microscopes, and surface force apparatus/balances) for electrical potential controlled lubrication. Next, we review the main experimental achievements in the performance and mechanisms of electrotunable lubrication, especially in ion-based lubricants (including electrolyte solutions, ionic liquids, and surfactants). We also present a discussion of the challenges in the future research in mechanisms and applications. This review aims to not only guide the research direction of electrical potential controlled lubrication, but also provides inspiration for cutting-edge fields like surface and interface interactions, and design of superlubrication and precision instrument.

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