Special Issue "Rural Land Management Interaction with Urbanization"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Contexts and Urban-Rural Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2022 | Viewed by 2087

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carmen Delgado Viñas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Urban and Regional Planning, E.T.S. of Civil Engineers, University of Cantabria, 39005 Santander, Cantabria, Spain
Interests: mountain areas; rural areas dynamics; rural depopulation; rural development; urbanization processes
Prof. Dr. María L. Gómez-Moreno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography Faculty of Philosophy and Letters, Campus of Teatinos, University of Málaga, 29071 Malaga, Spain
Interests: Mediterranean mountain areas; local development; regional policies impact on territories

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on how recent urbanization processes modifies the organization and management of the land uses at integrated rural areas in peri-urban and intra-metropolitan areas at local, national, and global levels.

Recent rural dynamics are primarily characterized by three interrelated trends: economic diversification, deagrarianization, and depopulation; the first two of which common to all rural areas.

It is true that deagrarianization and the simultaneous shift towards a service economy in present-day rural economies and societies have not led to the disappearance of rural space but instead some rural areas are presenting extraordinary territorial and economic transformation. These comprise zones that fall between the countryside and the city where intensive rural urbanization or peri-urbanization processes are taking place.

In the past, primary sector activities were very important, but their importance has steadily declined in both absolute and relative. Agricultural activity has become relatively unimportant as urban activities and functions acquire greater prominence.

This has substantially weakened and modified agricultural activities and transformed land use patterns in rural regions.

Nevertheless, in recent decades, agricultural activities had received new functions in peri-urban areas. As a common factor of all them, the acknowledgment of biodiversity and heritage values in the agricultural uses and the compatibility of both with quality food production. These concepts include eco-system services, peri-urban agricultural parks or home market agriculture, and urban productive landscapes.

Land use policy, especially legal regulations relating to construction land supply, are critical tools to harness territorial development. The policy trajectory of construction land supply entails a complicated reconfiguration of public functions, which is driven by rural–urban relations. The integrated urban-rural development should be raised through the experimentation of a new use policy and land management.

Many unanswered questions remain regarding the impacts of urbanization on rural areas. Contributions to this Special Issue could serve to provide some answers.

We invite papers that link countryside urbanization, deagrarianization, land management, land use planning, urban sprawl into rural areas, and integrated rural-urban development.

Prof. Dr. Carmen Delgado Viñas
Prof. Dr. María L. Gómez-Moreno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • countryside urbanization
  • deagrarianization
  • land management
  • land use planning
  • urban sprawl on rural areas
  • integrated rural-urban development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Which Polish Cities Sprawl the Most
Land 2021, 10(12), 1291; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10121291 - 25 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 498
Abstract
Spatial transformations stemming from urban sprawl are evident not only in the USA or Western Europe but also in Central and Eastern Europe, including Poland. Urban sprawl materialises mostly in land-cover and land-use change involving an increase in the proportion of urbanised areas [...] Read more.
Spatial transformations stemming from urban sprawl are evident not only in the USA or Western Europe but also in Central and Eastern Europe, including Poland. Urban sprawl materialises mostly in land-cover and land-use change involving an increase in the proportion of urbanised areas and discontinuous urban fabric in the total area. The paper’s objective was to identify the degree of urban sprawl based on the area of discontinuous urban fabric. The spatial analysis was aimed at finding differences in land-cover ratios by individual urbanised land categories. The analysed data for 2006, 2012, and 2018 were retrieved from the Urban Atlas. The method employed was NUASI (normalised Urban Atlas sprawl indicator). A series of computations revealed that urban sprawl is found in Poland as well. Changes caused by the increase in the discontinuous urban fabric in the total urban fabric were the most pronounced from 2006 to 2012. From 2012 to 2018, the pace of the increase stabilised, but its dynamics declined. The study demonstrated a strong spatial variability of the indicator. Urban sprawl was found to be the most intense in southern and southeastern Poland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rural Land Management Interaction with Urbanization)
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Article
Mining, Urban Growth, and Agrarian Changes in the Atacama Desert: The Case of the Calama Oasis in Northern Chile
Land 2021, 10(11), 1262; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10111262 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 520
Abstract
Since the mid-twentieth century, Latin American rural territories have undergone significant transformations. One of the leading causes is the expansion of large-scale operations that exploit natural resources for world market exportation with low processing. In this paper, we study the changes in agricultural [...] Read more.
Since the mid-twentieth century, Latin American rural territories have undergone significant transformations. One of the leading causes is the expansion of large-scale operations that exploit natural resources for world market exportation with low processing. In this paper, we study the changes in agricultural activities, livestock, and land use in the Calama oasis (the Atacama Desert, northern Chile) in relation to the growth of large-scale copper mining and other chained processes (urbanization and increased demand for water resources); based on a mixed methodology combining descriptive statistics, archival and bibliographic review, ethnography, and spatial analysis. We present the results through a historical reconstruction of the analyzed dimensions and their relationships, accounting for contradictory dynamics in time and space. We identify how mining and urban growth promote some agricultural and livestock activities under certain economic and political conditions, while in other contexts, these activities have been severely weakened, seeing increasing urbanization of rural land, rural-urban pluriactivity, and a growing deagrarianization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rural Land Management Interaction with Urbanization)
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