Special Issue "Land Use in Archaeology"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2022 | Viewed by 5442

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mark Altaweel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY, UK
Interests: complex systems; human-environment interactions; spatial modelling; machine learning; landscape archaeology
Dr. Yijie Zhuang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY, UK
Interests: ecology of early agriculture; long-term land use and landscape changes; irrigation and Water management; diverse trajectories to social complexity
Dr. Jaafar Jotheri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Al-Qadisiyah, Department of Archaeology, 88 Diwaniyah, Iraq
Interests: landscape archaeology; geoarchaeology; remote sensing; mesopotamian archaeology; ancient irrigation system; palaeoclimate

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are creating a Special Issue on land use in archeology. We would like to invite you to submit a contribution, as we feel that you are a capable author whose voice we should like to include. Increasingly, we see anthropogenic change transforming our global landscapes. However, in the past, drastic change in ecosystems and landforms have fundamentally shaped the course of social evolution. This Special Issue focuses on archaeological results and methods that have focused on determining land use in the past, covering prehistoric and historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeologists have used a variety of field-based, laboratory, experimental, and desk-based approaches to understand past land use. Authors are invited to present their results and developed methods on this topic, highlighting how their work can contribute to understanding past land use. We also feel that past land use has much to contribute to modern understanding of anthropogenic change. Researchers are encouraged to link their work on past systems with modern land use concerns. Examples can derive from any region and period to the beginning of the 20th century.

Dr. Mark Altaweel
Dr. Yijie Zhuang
Dr. Jaafar Jotheri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use
  • anthropogenic
  • climate
  • quantitative methods
  • qualitative methods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Application of Infrared Spectroscopy Techniques for Identification of Ancient Vegetation and Soil Change on Loess Areas
Land 2022, 11(8), 1294; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11081294 - 11 Aug 2022
Viewed by 293
Abstract
The discussion on the formation of Chernozems still has no consensus, and one of the outstanding questions is the type of the vegetation that supported the persistence of these soils in Central Europe over the Holocene period. The transformation of Chernozems and related [...] Read more.
The discussion on the formation of Chernozems still has no consensus, and one of the outstanding questions is the type of the vegetation that supported the persistence of these soils in Central Europe over the Holocene period. The transformation of Chernozems and related soil types may be clarified by paleoenvironmental studies, which integrate different investigation techniques and proxy data. We propose a procedure based on infrared reflectance spectroscopy of soil organic matter, that presumably contains specific fingerprints from land use and plant cover. A database of spectra for 337 samples representing vegetation classes (grassland, woodland and arable) and loess soil types (Chernozem, Phaeozem, Luvisol) was created to build a mathematical model, which allows to identify the origin of buried soils with unknown history. The comparison confirmed the applicability of both near-infrared and mid-infrared spectroscopy, with higher statistical affinity of MIR. A clear disjunction of land use/vegetation classes was proven and allowed reliable association of the samples from buried soils with grassland/woodland and episodes of arable land use, followed by prevailing forest vegetation after burial. The findings are consistent with proposed models in Poland and Czechia, and confirm the potential of spectroscopy techniques in identification of soil types and their evolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use in Archaeology)
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Article
The Khandaq Shapur: Defense, Irrigation, Boundary, Frontier
Land 2021, 10(10), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10101017 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2697
Abstract
Khandaq Shapur has been named one of the great barriers of the ancient world, but very little is known about the monumental-scale linear feature. This interdisciplinary paper brings together archaeologists and historians to present (1) an updated history of the Khandaq Shapur drawing [...] Read more.
Khandaq Shapur has been named one of the great barriers of the ancient world, but very little is known about the monumental-scale linear feature. This interdisciplinary paper brings together archaeologists and historians to present (1) an updated history of the Khandaq Shapur drawing upon a wider range of sources, including Arabic scholarly sources, and (2) a modern map of the Khandaq Shapur produced from a ground truthed remote sensing using historic Corona satellite imagery from the 1960s and imagery available in Google Earth. This new map of the Khandaq Shapur’s ground truthed location is compared to the known locations of Sasanian sites from previous archaeological surveys to contextualise the Khandaq Shapur within the wider archaeological landscape. Together, the landscape archaeology and historical evidence provide a comprehensive picture of this unique feature: shedding light not only on its precise location, but also its nature (what was it?) and how it was used over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use in Archaeology)
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Article
Different(ial) Human Use of Coastal Landscapes: Archaeological Contexts, Chronology, and Assemblages of El Teniente Bay (31° S, Chile, South America)
Land 2021, 10(6), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060577 - 30 May 2021
Viewed by 1124
Abstract
Coastal landscapes of the Pacific coast of South America are regarded as bountiful biomes, as they are zones on the fringes of Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystems. Cumulative research shows an almost uninterrupted presence of mobile hunter-fisher-gatherer communities throughout the Holocene in North-Central Chile [...] Read more.
Coastal landscapes of the Pacific coast of South America are regarded as bountiful biomes, as they are zones on the fringes of Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystems. Cumulative research shows an almost uninterrupted presence of mobile hunter-fisher-gatherer communities throughout the Holocene in North-Central Chile (29°–32° S). However, local-scale differences reveal the variability that is concealed by this broad characterization. Recent research in El Teniente Bay (31° S) shows few sites and occupations suggestive of low occupational redundancy as well as reduced archaeological assemblages, indicating limited activities in this landscape. However, several occupations date to the middle Holocene, a period when discontinuities in human occupations in response to adverse environmental conditions have been suggested on regional and supraregional scales. The main occupations detected at El Teniente are interpreted as a response to such conditions and in the context of changes in land use. Despite the spottiness of the archaeological record of El Teniente Bay, it is important in terms of its chronology and the differing trends in the use of space in comparison to other areas that have been the focuses of research. This paper addresses the archaeological record of El Teniente Bay and discusses its implications for human land use in the wider area of the coast of North-Central Chile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use in Archaeology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Agropastoral and Pastoral Land Use from the Iron Age through Recent Ethnographic Periods: Archaeological Survey
Authors: Claudia Chang, Sergey Ivanov, Perry Tourtellotte, Robert Spengler, III and Basira Mir Mahammad
Affiliation: ISAW, New York University; Faculty of International Affairs and Far Eastern Studies, Kyrgyz National University; Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Abstract: This article will document agropastoral and pastoral land use over a three millennia time period in the Juuku Valley in eastern Kyrgyzstan, on the south side of Lake Issyk kol. This mountain gorge extends from the marshy wetlands at the southern coast of Lake Issyk kul to alpine uplands of the Inner Tian Shan. The archaeological survey areas include two polygons, one in Chak Juuku at ca. 2000 m asl and the second at Lower Juuku at ca. 1800 m asl. The surveys initiated by the first three authors in 2019 are pedestrian surveys aided by the use of digital map databases from Google Earth, and former Soviet topographic maps and includes other map digital databases. During the surveys over 350 loci were inventoried, including isolated artifact finds, sherd scatters, graves, burial mounds (kurgans), and settlements. This paper builds upon an earlier contribution to Land, "Archaeological Settlement in the Juuku Valley." This article includes the preliminary results of small archaeobotanical samples taken from three settlements along with published and unpublished radiometric dates: Settlement 1, an upland Iron Age site, Settlement 2, an upland Medieval site, and Settlement 3, a lower terrace Kirghiz site. The goal of this paper is to provide a set of hypotheses for testing the changing land-use strategies of one upland gorge in the Inner Tian Shan as the initial steps toward developing a more sophisticated ArcView database documenting land use and mortuary practices over three millennia in the Juuku Valley.

Title: Spatial distribution of crops and the social dynamics in early 19th Bova, Calabria
Authors: Paula Kay Lazrus
Affiliation: St John’s University
Abstract: During the Napoleonic Period in Southern Calabria, Bova, a small hilltop community, sat in a position with rich vegetation and cultural and political isolation. Its citizens had access to a variety of natural resources, long standing ties to the religious infrastructure southern Italy, and a citizenry with multiple professions. Despite this, the community was not fully integrated into the larger economic system of the region, other areas of the Italian peninsula or the larger Mediterranean world. This paper explores the choices Bovan’s made in terms of what to grow and where to grow it utilizing cadastral records from the early 1800s and spatial analysis. It also considers how social status and power in terms of church owned vs local citizen owned properties was reflected in which land was used and where. The overall paucity of archaeological materials from this period in the landscape supports complicates the picture but also supports an interpretation of a very local and insular community poorly integrated into the greater Italian economy of the day.

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