Special Issue "Emergent Fungal Models for Genetics and Cell Biology"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pedro Gonçalves
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: microbial genetics; fungal biology; sociobiology; host-pathogen interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fungal kingdom encompasses an astounding diversity of organisms capable of the most wondrous activities. Despite this diversity, with estimates pointing to some millions of species around the globe, the number of fungal species that have been domesticated for industrial purposes or established in the laboratory to become models for genetics and cell biology is fairly small. Similarly, despite the countless contributions made to science using conventional fungal models such as the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the filamentous Neurospora crassa, various research questions have compelled lab mycologists to adapt previous knowledge or create new methodologies to make lesser popular species amenable to genetic manipulation and cell biology experimentation. This goal has been greatly facilitated by the increasing availability of whole genome sequencing and metagenomics as relatively widespread technologies and the development of the bioinformatics discipline.

In this Special Issue, we will cover some recent advances linked to the establishment of less conventional fungi as genetic models and how this can aid the community to understand their biology as well as ecological and evolutionary importance. We believe that this will prove to be an interesting series of articles.

Dr. Pedro Gonçalves
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fungal model
  • genetics
  • cell biology
  • animal and plant pathogen
  • animal pathogen
  • ectomycorrhiza
  • arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • endophyte
  • symbiosis
  • mycobiome

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
In Vitro or In Vivo Models, the Next Frontier for Unraveling Interactions between Malassezia spp. and Hosts. How Much Do We Know?
J. Fungi 2020, 6(3), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6030155 - 28 Aug 2020
Abstract
Malassezia is a lipid-dependent genus of yeasts known for being an important part of the skin mycobiota. These yeasts have been associated with the development of skin disorders and cataloged as a causal agent of systemic infections under specific conditions, making them opportunistic [...] Read more.
Malassezia is a lipid-dependent genus of yeasts known for being an important part of the skin mycobiota. These yeasts have been associated with the development of skin disorders and cataloged as a causal agent of systemic infections under specific conditions, making them opportunistic pathogens. Little is known about the host–microbe interactions of Malassezia spp., and unraveling this implies the implementation of infection models. In this mini review, we present different models that have been implemented in fungal infections studies with greater attention to Malassezia spp. infections. These models range from in vitro (cell cultures and ex vivo tissue), to in vivo (murine models, rabbits, guinea pigs, insects, nematodes, and amoebas). We additionally highlight the alternative models that reduce the use of mammals as model organisms, which have been gaining importance in the study of fungal host–microbe interactions. This is due to the fact that these systems have been shown to have reliable results, which correlate with those obtained from mammalian models. Examples of alternative models are Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Tenebrio molitor, and Galleria mellonella. These are invertebrates that have been implemented in the study of Malassezia spp. infections in order to identify differences in virulence between Malassezia species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergent Fungal Models for Genetics and Cell Biology)
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