Special Issue "Sea Level Rise: Drivers, Variability and Impacts"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
Website
Guest Editor
Physics Department, CESAM, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: estuarine oceanography; sea level rise; climate change; coastal flooding; tidal processes; physical-biogeochemical interactions; numerical modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is a global issue, which is felt on a local scale, characterized by the interplay between natural and human-induced pressures. In this context, there is an urgent need to analyze sea level rise drivers, variability, and impacts on the world’s coasts. Coastal populations, infrastructures, and local economies are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of rising sea levels, and it is increasingly necessary to know more precisely the factors responsible for sea level rise, to know, in detail, its variability and the expected impacts. Only with in-depth knowledge of these factors will it be possible to obtain targeted responses, develop adaptation plans, and promote informed actions to face the rising risks and costs that threaten coastal areas.

This Special Issue will gather and share new results, best practices, successes, lessons learned, and general insights that can contribute to improve the knowledge and enhance adaptation to sea level rise in a climate change context. Research articles, review articles, and case studies are welcome. Contributions should focus on local or broader scales, modeling, or analytical analyses. Examples of the following are especially welcome: local or regional studies; methods and challenges to understand sea level rise drivers and its evolution for next decades; projected climate change-driven variations in mean sea level; methods and results concerning sea level rise variability for present and future climates; examples of current and future impacts at different time and spatial scales; impacts on harbors and coastal structures; flooding of low-lying areas; human and natural adaptation and mitigation measures; combined effects of sea level rise and other coastal dynamic drivers (tide, storm surges, etc.); frequency and intensity of extremes; and any other innovative contributions that combine the sustainability of coasts and their economies.

Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change scenarios
  • Coastal flooding
  • Statistical analysis
  • Extreme events
  • Coastal infrastructures
  • Coastal economy
  • Adaptation and mitigation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Approaching Sea-Level Rise (SLR) Change: Strengthening Local Responses to Sea-Level Rise and Coping with Climate Change in Northern Mozambique
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020205 - 16 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Mean sea-level is expected to rise significantly by 2100 in all scenarios, including those compatible with the objectives of the Paris Climate Agreement. Global sea level rise projections indicate devastating implications for populations, ecosystem services and biodiversity. The implications of the sea-level rise [...] Read more.
Mean sea-level is expected to rise significantly by 2100 in all scenarios, including those compatible with the objectives of the Paris Climate Agreement. Global sea level rise projections indicate devastating implications for populations, ecosystem services and biodiversity. The implications of the sea-level rise (SLR) on low-lying islands and coastal regions and communities are substantial and require deep-rooted coping measures. In the absence of adequate responses for coping, Mozambique is expected to record huge losses, with an impact on the economy and development in many sectors of its coastal regions mainly in northern Mozambique. This research aimed to perform projections on SLR in Mozambique, and to understand its role and implications on the north coast of the country. SLR was estimated through the analysis of model outputs that support the global estimates of the fifth IPCC report near the Mozambican coast, for each of the four representative concentration pathways (RCPs) scenarios. Regional coastline retreat and coastal erosion were estimated through the results of global sandy coastlines projections developed by Vousdoukas. Mean sea-level rise projections indicate that regional estimates for the Mozambican coast are relative higher than global estimates (~0.05 m) for all representative concentration pathways (RCPs). Yet, we highlight significant differences in sea-level rises of 0.5 m, 0.7 m or 1.0 m by 2100 compared to the global mean. It is expected that with the increase in the mean sea level in the northern part of the Mozambican coast, erosive effects will increase, as well as the retreat of the coastline until 2100. With this, the tourism sector, settlements, ecosystem services and local populations are expected to be significantly affected by 2050, with increased threats in 2100 (RCP4.5, RCP8.5). Local responses for coping are proposed and properly discussed for the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios through 2100. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sea Level Rise: Drivers, Variability and Impacts)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Tropical Cyclone Nicholas (11–20 February 2008) on Sea Level Anomalies in Indonesian Waters
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110948 - 20 Nov 2020
Viewed by 414
Abstract
As reported extensively in both electronic and print media in Indonesia, high wave and anomalously high sea level phenomena occurred in February 2008 in Indonesian waters, mainly along the western coast of Sumatra and the southern coasts of Java-Bali. Tropical Cyclone (TC) Nicholas, [...] Read more.
As reported extensively in both electronic and print media in Indonesia, high wave and anomalously high sea level phenomena occurred in February 2008 in Indonesian waters, mainly along the western coast of Sumatra and the southern coasts of Java-Bali. Tropical Cyclone (TC) Nicholas, occurring in northwestern coastal waters of Australia between 11 and 20 February 2008, might have contributed to the existence of these phenomena in the Indonesian region. This study focused on investigating the effect of TC Nicholas on the increases in sea levels in the Indonesian waters by analyzing residual water levels (non-astronomic tide). In this regard, a storm tide event (the sum of the astronomical tide and storm surge generated by the TC Nicholas) was simulated in this region using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The residual water levels were obtained by removing the tidal part (astronomic tide) from the ROMS simulated total water levels. In addition, to confirm possible influences of TC Nicholas, a lagged correlation analysis was applied between atmospheric pressure at the center of TC Nicholas and residual water level oscillations in the Indonesian waters. It was found that the residual water levels showed a strong correlation with the atmospheric pressure at the center of TC Nicholas in some areas of the Indonesian seas, such as the western coast of Sumatra, the southern coast of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands, and the southern coast of Papua. The increased sea levels on the western coast of Sumatra are up to 16 cm, with TC Nicholas leading the residual water level by 4.18 days (TL: time lag). Meanwhile, they are up to 20 cm (TL = 5.75 days), 21 cm (TL = 1.12 days), and 38 cm (TL = 3.96 days) on the southern coast of Java, the Lesser Sunda Islands, and the southern coast of Papua, respectively. The results of this study could be used as an initial assessment to investigate the most vulnerable Indonesian coastal areas to the impact of the TC and they might be significantly beneficial for designing both a proper disaster risk reduction program and investment policies in the region, particularly in the context of flood risk reduction and adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sea Level Rise: Drivers, Variability and Impacts)
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