Special Issue "Coastal Waters Systems Evolution under Climate Changes and Global Warming: An Integrated and Multidisciplinary Approach"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José Fortes Lopes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, CESAM-Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Universidade de Aveiro Campos Universitário Santiago, 3800-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Tel. 234370821
Interests: hydrodynamics; ecological; modelling; estuarine; coastal circulation; climate changes
Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CESAM, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Tel. +351 234 370 276; Fax: +351 234 378 197
Interests: estuarine oceanography; sea level; climate change; coastal flooding; tides; physical-biogeochemical interactions; numerical modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate changes and global warming are expected to significantly impact coastal water systems. Changes in air and water temperatures, as well as sea level rise are expected to greatly influence coastal water dynamics and ecosystems. In particular, sea level rise will affect the exchange between ocean and coastal waters, inducing changes in lagoon and estuarine circulations, which, in turn, can affect the transport of dissolved and suspended matter, the nutrient and sediment budgets, and, ultimately, the biogeochemical processes inside those systems.

Due to the interconnection between these processes, integrated and multidisciplinary approaches are necessary to forecast the evolution of these coastal systems. This requires bringing together specialists from several scientific areas in order to discuss the state-of-the-art of their sciences, including more recent and modern tools, namely numerical and risk assessment models and data management.

This Special Issue aims to contribute to the assessment and quantification of coastal ecosystems status under present and future climates, as well as to indicate the directions needed to manage and mitigate related risks and uncertainties.

It is, therefore, intended to bring together the scientific community from several areas of coastal water science (biologist, geophysicist, climatologist, modelers, engineers, etc.) by inviting contributions focusing on:

  • The state-of-the-art of modelling coastal water systems
  • The risk assessment tools for the coastal water systems
  • The present and the future climates for coastal areas, including meteorological extreme events
  • Case studies and scenarios under different forcing: Induced naturally, anthropogenically and/or by climate change
  • The global warming impact in coastal systems
  • Vulnerability of coastal systems under climate change scenarios

Research articles, review articles, case studies and perspectives dealing with coastal system and the issues related to global changes, including anthropogenic, natural and climate changes, are, therefore, welcome to this Issue. We look forward receiving original contributions.

Prof. Dr. José Fortes Lopes
Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate changes
  • global Warming
  • sea level rise
  • coastal systems
  • physical and biogeochemical processes
  • numerical and risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Modeling the Impact of Extreme River Discharge on the Nutrient Dynamics and Dissolved Oxygen in Two Adjacent Estuaries (Portugal)
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(11), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7110412 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
The Minho and Lima are adjacent estuaries located in the north of Portugal, with high ecological and economic importance. To address gaps in knowledge about changes in nutrient patterns in adjacent estuaries subject to different freshwater inflows, a numerical model, Delft3D, was implemented [...] Read more.
The Minho and Lima are adjacent estuaries located in the north of Portugal, with high ecological and economic importance. To address gaps in knowledge about changes in nutrient patterns in adjacent estuaries subject to different freshwater inflows, a numerical model, Delft3D, was implemented and developed, using a single domain, which allowed physical communication between estuaries. Calibration and validation of the model was successfully performed. Three numerical simulations were carried out, in which only river flows were varied (1st corresponds to a baseline numerical run, the 2nd a flood scenario, and the 3rd a drought scenario). Under flooding conditions, similar patterns were verified in both estuaries, with high fluvial discharges showing to have a reduced impact on both estuarine dynamics. In this case the nutrients were not a limiting factor for the biota, both for summer and winter seasons, since there was no significant decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration. For the drought scenario, it was observed that the estuary with the lower inflow of freshwater (Lima) was the most affected, with a significant decrease in the concentration of nutrients and oxygen dissolved in the winter season (decrease of 2 mg O2/L). In conclusion, this work reveals that it is essential to continuously monitor dam-controlled estuarine systems, as a significant decrease in river discharge will cause significant changes in the variables analysed (O2, PO4, and NO3) and may cause loss of biodiversity. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Climate Change Impact in the Ria de Aveiro Lagoon Ecosystem: A Case Study
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(10), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7100352 - 03 Oct 2019
Abstract
Climate change and global sea-level rise are major issues of the 21st century. The main goal of this study is to assess the physical and biogeochemical status of the Ria de Aveiro lagoon (Portugal) under future climate scenarios, using a coupled physical/ eutrophication [...] Read more.
Climate change and global sea-level rise are major issues of the 21st century. The main goal of this study is to assess the physical and biogeochemical status of the Ria de Aveiro lagoon (Portugal) under future climate scenarios, using a coupled physical/ eutrophication model. The impact on the lagoon ecosystem status of the mean sea level rise (MSLR), the amplitude rise of the M2 tidal constituent (M2R), the changes in the river discharge, and the rising of the air temperature was investigated. Under MSLR and M2R, the results point to an overall salinity increase and water temperature decrease, revealing ocean water dominance. The main lagoon areas presented salinity values close to those of the ocean waters (~34 PSU), while a high range of salinity was presented for the river and the far end areas (20–34 PSU). The water temperature showed a decrease of approximately 0.5–1.5 °C. The responses of the biogeochemical variables reflect the increase of the oceanic inflow (transparent and nutrient-poor water) or the reduction of the river flows (nutrient-rich waters). The results evidenced, under the scenarios, an overall decreasing of the inorganic nitrogen concentration and the carbon phytoplankton concentrations. A warm climate, although increasing the water temperature, does not seem to affect the lagoon’s main status, at least in the frame of the model used in the study. Full article
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