Special Issue "Marine Oil Spills 2020"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Merv Fingas
Website
Guest Editor
Spill Science, Edmonton, Alberta T6W 1J6, Canada
Interests: oil spill remote sensing; oil spill dynamics and behaviour; oil spills; oil properties; oil analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oil spill remote sensing has progressed significantly in the past few years. Remote sensing plays an increasingly important role in oil spill response efforts. Through the use of modern remote sensing instrumentation, oil can be monitored on the open ocean on a 24-hour basis. With knowledge of slick locations, response personnel can more effectively conduct countermeasures.

There is growing progress in the performance of both strategic sensors such as satellite-borne radars as well as low-cost sensors such as visible and infrared cameras. The most progress has been made in the development of the use and application software for all sensors. We are now able to eliminate noise; correct images; and focus on oil spills.

This Special Issue aims to highlight advances in the development, testing, and use of oil spill remote sensing systems. Topics include but are not limited to the following:

New developments in remote sensing;

Software to remove noise and enhance oil spill signals;

New sensors and testing of sensors;

Use of remote sensing on spills, e.g., DeepWater Horizon and others;

Use of remote sensing for illegal discharge detection;

Specialized sensors such as fluorosensors and thickness sensors;

Ship or coastal-mounted sensors;

Airborne sensors and campaigns;

Drone-mounted sensors.

Dr. Merv Fingas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oil spill remote sensing
  • Oil spill remote sensing software
  • New oil spill sensors
  • Use of remote sensing on spills
  • Use of remote sensing for illegal discharge detection
  • Fluorosensors or thickness sensors
  • Ship or coastal-mounted oil spill sensors
  • Drone-mounted oil spill sensors.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Oil Droplet Dispersion under a Deep-Water Plunging Breaker: Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(4), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8040230 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Knowledge of the droplet size distribution (DSD) of spilled oil is essential for the accurate prediction of oil transport, dissolution, and biodegradation. Breaking waves play important roles in oil droplet formation in oceanic environments. To understand the effects of breaking waves on oil [...] Read more.
Knowledge of the droplet size distribution (DSD) of spilled oil is essential for the accurate prediction of oil transport, dissolution, and biodegradation. Breaking waves play important roles in oil droplet formation in oceanic environments. To understand the effects of breaking waves on oil DSD, oil spill experiments were designed and performed in a large-scale wave tank. A plunging breaker with a height of about 0.4 m was produced using the dispersive focusing method within the tank. Oil placed within the breaker resulted in a DSD that was measured using a shadowgraph camera and found to fit a Gaussian distribution N (µ = 1.2 mm, σ2 = 0.29 mm2). For droplets smaller than 1500 µm, the number-based DSD matched the DS1988 correlation, which gives N(d) ~ d−2.3, but this was N(d) ~ d−9.7 for droplets larger than 1500 µm. An order of magnitude investigation revealed that a Gaussian volume-based DSD results in a number-based DSD that may be approximated by d−b (with b ≈ 2) for small diameters (relative to the mean), which explains the occurrence of the DS1988 correlation. With the measured wave hydrodynamics, the VDROP model was adopted to simulate the DSD, which closely matched the observed DSD. The present results reduce the empiricism of the DS1988 correlation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Oil Spills 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermal Infrared Spectral Characteristics of Bunker Fuel Oil to Determine Oil-Film Thickness and API
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020135 - 19 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Remote sensing is an important method for monitoring marine oil-spill accidents. However, methods for measuring oil-film thickness remain insufficient. Due to the stable differences in the surface emissivity and temperature of oil and water, the oil film can be detected using thermal infrared. [...] Read more.
Remote sensing is an important method for monitoring marine oil-spill accidents. However, methods for measuring oil-film thickness remain insufficient. Due to the stable differences in the surface emissivity and temperature of oil and water, the oil film can be detected using thermal infrared. This study measured emissivity of seven different oil-film thicknesses and seven different American Petroleum Institute (API) densities, and analyzed the spectral characteristics. Results show an optimal wavelength position for oil-film thickness and fuel API density monitoring is 12.55 μm. Principal component analysis and continuum removal methods were used for data processing. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to establish relationships between emissivity and oil slick thicknesses and API densities. Oil-film thickness and fuel API density data were analyzed by principal component analysis and continuum removal before regression analysis. The spectral emissivity data was convolved into Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) thermal bands to determine potential of the sensor in oil-film detection. The result shows that neither could be used to estimate thickness. The AVHRR-4 band and band 12 and 13 of the ASTER could be used to separate oils from water and have potential to distinguish different oil types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Oil Spills 2020)
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