Special Issue "Intelligence in Education"

A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tomoe Kanaya

Department of Psychology, Claremont McKenna College, 888 Columbia Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: IQ testing in special education diagnoses; educational and legal policy; longitudinal methodology; Flynn effect

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United States has a long and controversial relationship with the use of standardized testing in public education. This Special Issue will include research from cognitive, developmental, educational, cultural, school, and quantitative psychology to examine the impact of various testing practices and policies within American education, with an emphasis on IQ and achievement tests.

Prof. Dr. Tomoe Kanaya
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • IQ
  • testing in education
  • educational policy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Intelligence in Education
Received: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
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Abstract
The articles in this special issue provide an overview of the wide breadth of questions and methodologies that arise when the research devoted to intelligence intersect with the research devoted to U.S. education. The unique contributions of each paper are highlighted and discussed [...] Read more.
The articles in this special issue provide an overview of the wide breadth of questions and methodologies that arise when the research devoted to intelligence intersect with the research devoted to U.S. education. The unique contributions of each paper are highlighted and discussed based on their contribution to the literature. The implications of these findings for educational research and policy are briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Longitudinal IQ Trends in Children Diagnosed with Emotional Disturbance: An Analysis of Historical Data
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 October 2018 / Published: 8 October 2018
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Abstract
The overwhelming majority of the research on the historical impact of IQ in special education has focused on children with cognitive disorders. Far less is known about its role for students with emotional concerns, including Emotional Disturbance (ED). To address this gap, the [...] Read more.
The overwhelming majority of the research on the historical impact of IQ in special education has focused on children with cognitive disorders. Far less is known about its role for students with emotional concerns, including Emotional Disturbance (ED). To address this gap, the current study examined IQ trends in ED children who were repeatedly tested on various combinations of the WISC, WISC-R, and WISC-III using a geographically diverse, longitudinal database of special education evaluation records. Findings on test/re-test data revealed that ED children experienced IQ trends that were consistent with previous research on the Flynn effect in the general population. Unlike findings associated with test/re-test data for children diagnosed with cognitive disorders, however, ED re-diagnoses were unaffected by these trends. Specifically, ED children’s declining IQ scores when retested on newer norms did not result in changes in their ED diagnosis. The implications of this unexpected finding are discussed within the broader context of intelligence testing and special education policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)
Open AccessArticle
Using Standardized Test Scores to Include General Cognitive Ability in Education Research and Policy
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (694 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In education research and education policy, much attention is paid to schools, curricula, and teachers, but little attention is paid to the characteristics of students. Differences in general cognitive ability (g) are often overlooked as a source of important variance among [...] Read more.
In education research and education policy, much attention is paid to schools, curricula, and teachers, but little attention is paid to the characteristics of students. Differences in general cognitive ability (g) are often overlooked as a source of important variance among schools and in outcomes among students within schools. Standardized test scores such as the SAT and ACT are reasonably good proxies for g and are available for most incoming college students. Though the idea of g being important in education is quite old, we present contemporary evidence that colleges and universities in the United States vary considerably in the average cognitive ability of their students, which correlates strongly with other methods (including international methods) of ranking colleges. We also show that these g differences are reflected in the extent to which graduates of colleges are represented in various high-status and high-income occupations. Finally, we show how including individual-level measures of cognitive ability can substantially increase the statistical power of experiments designed to measure educational treatment effects. We conclude that education policy researchers should give more consideration to the concept of individual differences in cognitive ability as well as other factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Misuse of IQ Scores: Using the Dual Discrepancy/Consistency Model for Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities
Received: 6 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (365 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe the origins of patterns of strengths and weaknesses (PSW) methods for identifying specific learning disabilities (SLD) and to provide a comprehensive review of the assumptions and evidence supporting the most commonly-used PSW method in the [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to describe the origins of patterns of strengths and weaknesses (PSW) methods for identifying specific learning disabilities (SLD) and to provide a comprehensive review of the assumptions and evidence supporting the most commonly-used PSW method in the United States: Dual Discrepancy/Consistency (DD/C). Given their use in determining whether students have access to special education and related services, it is important that any method used to identify SLD have supporting evidence. A review of the DD/C evidence indicates it cannot currently be classified as an evidence-based method for identifying individuals with a SLD. We show that the DD/C method is unsound for three major reasons: (a) it requires test scores have properties that they fundamentally lack, (b) lack of experimental utility evidence supporting its use, and (c) evidence supporting the inability of the method to identify SLD accurately. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)
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Other

Open AccessOpinion
Multiple Intelligences in Teaching and Education: Lessons Learned from Neuroscience
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 26 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (464 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This brief paper summarizes a mixed method review of over 500 neuroscientific reports investigating the proposition that general intelligence (g or IQ) and multiple intelligences (MI) can be integrated based on common and unique neural systems. Extrapolated from this interpretation are five [...] Read more.
This brief paper summarizes a mixed method review of over 500 neuroscientific reports investigating the proposition that general intelligence (g or IQ) and multiple intelligences (MI) can be integrated based on common and unique neural systems. Extrapolated from this interpretation are five principles that inform teaching and curriculum so that education can be strengths-based and personalized to promote academic achievement. This framework is proposed as a comprehensive model for a system of educational cognitive neuroscience that will serve the fields of neuroscience as well as educators. Five key principles identified are culture matters, every brain is unique—activate strengths, know thyself, embodied cognition/emotional rudder, and make it mean something. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)
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