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Longitudinal IQ Trends in Children Diagnosed with Emotional Disturbance: An Analysis of Historical Data

1
Department of Psychology, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
2
Department of Human Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 October 2018 / Published: 8 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence in Education)
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PDF [241 KB, uploaded 8 October 2018]

Abstract

The overwhelming majority of the research on the historical impact of IQ in special education has focused on children with cognitive disorders. Far less is known about its role for students with emotional concerns, including Emotional Disturbance (ED). To address this gap, the current study examined IQ trends in ED children who were repeatedly tested on various combinations of the WISC, WISC-R, and WISC-III using a geographically diverse, longitudinal database of special education evaluation records. Findings on test/re-test data revealed that ED children experienced IQ trends that were consistent with previous research on the Flynn effect in the general population. Unlike findings associated with test/re-test data for children diagnosed with cognitive disorders, however, ED re-diagnoses were unaffected by these trends. Specifically, ED children’s declining IQ scores when retested on newer norms did not result in changes in their ED diagnosis. The implications of this unexpected finding are discussed within the broader context of intelligence testing and special education policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: IQ; Flynn effect; Emotional Disturbance; historical analysis; longitudinal methods IQ; Flynn effect; Emotional Disturbance; historical analysis; longitudinal methods
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Kanaya, T.; Ceci, S.J. Longitudinal IQ Trends in Children Diagnosed with Emotional Disturbance: An Analysis of Historical Data. J. Intell. 2018, 6, 45.

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