Special Issue "Collective Intelligence: Individual and Team Ability"

A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Michelle Martin-Raugh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08541, USA
Interests: collaboration; negotiation; oral communication; situational judgment tests; employment interviews; noncognitive skills
Dr. Patrick C. Kyllonen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Academic to Career Research Center, Research & Development, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08541, USA
Interests: psychometrics; measurement; personality; cognitive psychology; response time; noncognitive skills
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Collective intelligence commonly refers to the intelligence of a group working together to learn, remember, create, solve problems, or make decisions. Technology advances have enabled improved communication and sharing of knowledge, and continued advances are likely to bring progressively greater interconnectedness. Human intelligence is likely to become gradually more defined by one’s ability to contribute to or act on information produced or obtained in a collective context. Groups, rather than individuals, are increasingly likely to be the target level of analysis for studies on intelligence, its antecedents, and consequences.

The literature on human intelligence has not yet fully embraced this view, and except for a few notable efforts (Woolley et al., 2010; OECD, 2017), there is a dearth of empirical research studying collaborative skill as an individual difference, or studying the generalization of collective performance across time and across tasks.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to explore ways in which collective intelligence might be defined, measured, and evaluated, either as an individual-differences construct, or as a measure of group-level performance. We invite empirical, theoretical, and review articles that address issues of collective intelligence, defined broadly. We encourage diverse approaches to the problem, including psychometric, cognitive, social, behavioral, organizational, educational, differential, and neuroscience approaches. Some examples of questions we hope contributions will address include the following:

  • Is there a collective intelligence factor in the sense of generalization of group-relative performance across learning and performance tasks?
  • What are some of the individual-level and process predictors of successful groups?
  • Is it possible to quantify the strength of an individual’s contributions to a group?
  • What methodologies can we use to measure collective performance and individual contributions to group performance?
  • How important are cognitive versus noncognitive predictors of group performance?

We believe in transparency and open science principles. Therefore, we will adhere to the requirements listed here under Section 2.2: http://opennessinitiative.org/PRO_Initiative_RSOS.pdf

Dr. Michelle Martin-Raugh
Dr. Patrick C. Kyllonen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • teams
  • groups
  • collective
  • collaboration
  • cooperation
  • teamwork
  • ability
  • skill
  • intelligence
  • individual differences

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Computer-Based Collaborative Problem Solving in PISA 2015 and the Role of Personality
J. Intell. 2019, 7(3), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence7030015 - 01 Jul 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4223
Abstract
Collaborative problem solving (CPS) is an essential 21st century skill at the intersection of social collaboration and cognitive problem solving, and is increasingly integrated in educational programs, such as the influential Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). As research has identified the impact [...] Read more.
Collaborative problem solving (CPS) is an essential 21st century skill at the intersection of social collaboration and cognitive problem solving, and is increasingly integrated in educational programs, such as the influential Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). As research has identified the impact of the Big Five personality traits either on cognitive ability or social collaboration skills in groups, this study firstly identified their impact on the conjoint construct of CPS. Results from structural equation modelling (N = 483) found openness to experience and agreeableness as predictors for CPS performance. The results are embedded in the lifelong learning and investment model by Ackermann and provide implications for PISA 2015, as original PISA 2015 CPS tasks were used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Intelligence: Individual and Team Ability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
How Approaches to Animal Swarm Intelligence Can Improve the Study of Collective Intelligence in Human Teams
J. Intell. 2020, 8(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8010009 - 02 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3342
Abstract
Researchers of team behavior have long been interested in the essential components of effective teamwork. Much existing research focuses on examining correlations between team member traits, team processes, and team outcomes, such as collective intelligence or team performance. However, these approaches are insufficient [...] Read more.
Researchers of team behavior have long been interested in the essential components of effective teamwork. Much existing research focuses on examining correlations between team member traits, team processes, and team outcomes, such as collective intelligence or team performance. However, these approaches are insufficient for providing insight into the dynamic, causal mechanisms through which the components of teamwork interact with one another and impact the emergence of team outcomes. Advances in the field of animal behavior have enabled a precise understanding of the behavioral mechanisms that enable groups to perform feats that surpass the capabilities of the individuals that comprise them. In this manuscript, we highlight how studies of animal swarm intelligence can inform research on collective intelligence in human teams. By improving the ability to obtain precise, time-varying measurements of team behaviors and outcomes and building upon approaches used in studies of swarm intelligence to analyze and model individual and group-level behaviors, researchers can gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the emergence of collective intelligence. Such understanding could inspire targeted interventions to improve team effectiveness and support the development of a comparative framework of group-level intelligence in animal and human groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Intelligence: Individual and Team Ability)
Back to TopTop