Intelligence and Inter- and Intra-Personal Processes

A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 10688

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Management and Organizational Studies, Faculty of Social Science, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5C2, Canada
Interests: personality and intelligence; behavior genetics; personality structure; measurement; vocational interests
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Education, and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Burg. Oudlaan 50 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: organizational psychology; personality; cognitive neuroscience; psychological assessment

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Stawki 5/7, 00-183 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: intelligence; personality; cognitive science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Intelligence is one of the most consistent predictors of many real-life outcomes such as educational achievement, work success, socio-economic status, and good health. Although intelligence has also been related to psychological adjustment and social interactions, its role in these processes is less established. For example, initially, it was thought that cognitive and social intelligence show a trade-off in which very smart people may have compromised social effectiveness. Yet, in contrast to this notion, large longitudinal studies such as the well-known Terman’s Termites project showed that highly intelligent children, on average, become successful and socially adjusted adults. Overall, it seems that intelligence also contributes to navigating the social world. On the other hand, it remains unclear whether cognitive intelligence is related to constructs such as emotional intelligence or resilience. 

This Special Issue aims to address a wide range of topics examining the contribution of cognitive ability to intrapersonal processes (e.g., resilience, stability) and interpersonal interactions. This includes, but is not limited to, questions such as: Do cognitive abilities relate to interpersonal or emotional processes? Do lower cognitive abilities tend to relate to more interpersonal problems? Is intelligence related to socially moral reasoning? How do people with highly different levels of intelligence communicate with each other? And, do cognitive abilities affect strategies to maintain or restore well-being in difficult times? We also welcome empirical or theoretical papers that may challenge the role of intelligence in interpersonal or emotional processes.  

We invite papers to the Journal of Intelligence testing theoretical models and empirical studies on intelligence and cognitive processes with:

  • Social behavior, including social effectiveness, antisocial traits, and behavior (e.g. aggression, Dark Triad)
  • Interpersonal relationships
  • Emotional and motivational processes
  • Well-being

Various research approaches, e.g., correlational, experimental, longitudinal, and perspectives, e.g., clinical or typical population, are welcome. We would favor papers that go beyond merely establishing relationships (correlations) and that address underlying mechanisms, alternative explanations, or intermediate processes. Overall, we are especially interested in studies that help to understand possible relationships between cognitive intelligence and variables outside the cognitive domain.

Prof. Dr. Julie Aitken Schermer
Prof. Dr. Dimitri van der Linden
Prof. Dr. Marcin Zajenkowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 624 KiB  
Communication
A New Perspective on Assessing Cognition in Children through Estimating Shared Intentionality
by Igor Val Danilov and Sandra Mihailova
J. Intell. 2022, 10(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence10020021 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3277
Abstract
This theoretical article aims to create a conceptual framework for future research on digital methods for assessing cognition in children through estimating shared intentionality, different from assessing through behavioral markers. It shows the new assessing paradigm based directly on the evaluation of parent-child [...] Read more.
This theoretical article aims to create a conceptual framework for future research on digital methods for assessing cognition in children through estimating shared intentionality, different from assessing through behavioral markers. It shows the new assessing paradigm based directly on the evaluation of parent-child interaction exchanges (protoconversation), allowing early monitoring of children’s developmental trajectories. This literature analysis attempts to understand how cognition is related to emotions in interpersonal dynamics and whether assessing these dynamics shows cognitive abilities in children. The first part discusses infants’ unexpected achievements, observing the literature about children’s development. The analysis supposes that due to the caregiver’s help under emotional arousal, newborns’ intentionality could appear even before it is possible for children’s intention to occur. The emotional bond evokes intentionality in neonates. Therefore, they can manifest unexpected achievements while performing them with caregivers. This outcome shows an appearance of protoconversation in adult-children dyads through shared intentionality. The article presents experimental data of other studies that extend our knowledge about human cognition by showing an increase of coordinated neuronal activities and the acquisition of new knowledge by subjects in the absence of sensory cues. This highlights the contribution of interpersonal interaction to gain cognition, discussed already by Vygotsky. The current theoretical study hypothesizes that if shared intentionality promotes cognition from the onset, this interaction modality can also facilitate cognition in older children. Therefore in the second step, the current article analyzes empirical data of recent studies that reported meaningful interaction in mother-infant dyads without sensory cues. It discusses whether an unbiased digital assessment of the interaction ability of children is possible before the age when the typical developmental trajectory implies verbal communication. The article develops knowledge for a digital assessment that can measure the extent of children’s ability to acquire knowledge through protoconversation. This specific assessment can signalize the lack of communication ability in children even when the typical trajectory of peers’ development does not imply verbal communication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence and Inter- and Intra-Personal Processes)
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18 pages, 1867 KiB  
Article
Less-Intelligent and Unaware? Accuracy and Dunning–Kruger Effects for Self-Estimates of Different Aspects of Intelligence
by Gabriela Hofer, Valentina Mraulak, Sandra Grinschgl and Aljoscha C. Neubauer
J. Intell. 2022, 10(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence10010010 - 5 Feb 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 6395
Abstract
People’s perceptions of their intelligence correlate only moderately with objective intelligence measures. On average, people overestimate themselves. According to the popular Dunning–Kruger effect, this is particularly true for low performers: across many domains, those in the lowest quartile overestimate their abilities the most. [...] Read more.
People’s perceptions of their intelligence correlate only moderately with objective intelligence measures. On average, people overestimate themselves. According to the popular Dunning–Kruger effect, this is particularly true for low performers: across many domains, those in the lowest quartile overestimate their abilities the most. However, recent work using improved statistical approaches found little support for a Dunning–Kruger effect in general intelligence. We investigated accuracy and Dunning–Kruger effects for self-estimates of general, verbal, numerical, and spatial intelligence—domains that differed in how well they can be judged in the past. A total of 281 participants completed self-estimates and intelligence measures online. Self-estimates showed mostly moderate correlational accuracy that was slightly higher for numerical intelligence and lower for verbal intelligence. Across domains, participants rated their intelligence as above average. However, as their intelligence was indeed high, this was not an overestimation. While standard analyses indicated Dunning–Kruger effects in general, verbal, and spatial intelligence, improved statistical methods only yielded some support for one in verbal intelligence: people with lower verbal intelligence tended to have less self-knowledge about it. The generalizability of these findings is limited to young, highly educated populations. Nevertheless, our results contribute to a growing literature questioning the generality of the Dunning–Kruger effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence and Inter- and Intra-Personal Processes)
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