Special Issue "Intelligence, Competencies, and Learning"

A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Matthias Ziegler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 18, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Interests: personality and intelligence; intelligence and performance; learning and individual differences; educational measurement; personality structure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Samuel Greiff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Cognitive Science and Assessment, University of Luxembourg, L-4366 Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
Interests: educational psychology; assessment; problem solving; multivariate statistics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue seeks contributions which focus on the learning and the specific and/or joint influences of intelligence and competencies. Intelligence is used as an umbrella term for a variety of cognitive abilities at different hierarchical levels. Competence refers to ideas such as those outlined in Blömeke, S., Gustafsson, J. E., and Shavelson, R. J. (2015). Beyond dichotomies: Competence viewed as a continuum. Zeitschrift für Psychologie, 223, 3-13. doi.org/10.1027/2151-2604/a000194

Thus, papers should ideally combine all three phenomena (learning, intelligence, and competence), but at the very least, we are looking for papers that combine two of the following:

  1. a focus on some aspect of human intelligence/cognitive ability either as an antecedent, a consequence, or a correlate of learning;
  2. a focus on competencies that are often (but not always) domain-bound. Competencies that have been focused on international large-scale assessments such as mathematics, reading, or problem solving can be the focus, but contributions on other competencies are also welcome;
  3. a focus on some forms of learning or learning outcomes in an educational context. With regard to learning we are interested in research focusing the micro and / or macro level. In other words, research looking at specific learning processes is just as welcome as research focusing on longitudinal development or learning results. We expect most contributions from the field of secondary education, but contributions that consider primary or tertiary education, lifelong learning, or learning in informal contexts are equally welcome.

In general, we are looking for papers which are built on an empirical basis. However, papers proposing theoretical developments are also welcome. Contributions may apply a host of methods as long as these methods serve the purpose of adequately addressing the underlying research questions. This includes methods such as structural equation modeling and IRT analyses. Given that we also want to look at learning processes, other methods might encompass longitudinal methods, such as time series analyses or latent growth analyses. In addition to this, we are particularly interested in contributions that employ big data methods such as (educational) data mining, machine learning, or artificial intelligence that offer new opportunities to describe and trace the complex interplay between intelligence, competencies, and learning.

Prof. Dr. Matthias Ziegler
Prof. Dr. Samuel Greiff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Essay
Adaptive Intelligence: Intelligence Is Not a Personal Trait but Rather a Person × Task × Situation Interaction
J. Intell. 2021, 9(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence9040058 - 26 Nov 2021
Viewed by 197
Abstract
This article explores the advantages of viewing intelligence not as a fixed trait residing within an individual, but rather as a person × task × situation interaction. The emphasis in the article is on the role of persons solving tasks embedded in situations [...] Read more.
This article explores the advantages of viewing intelligence not as a fixed trait residing within an individual, but rather as a person × task × situation interaction. The emphasis in the article is on the role of persons solving tasks embedded in situations involving learning, intellectual abilities, and competencies. The article opens with a consideration of the role of situations in intelligent behavior. The article then discusses how intelligence is more similar to creativity and wisdom, in terms of the role of situations, than many psychologists have realized. Then the article reviews the role of situations in identity-based and irrational thinking and in conspiratorial thinking and cults. Next the article discusses the demonstrated importance of situations in assessment, but also notes the difficulties in sampling situations. Finally, the article draws conclusions, in particular, that, given our lack of situation-based tests, we need to be more modest in our interpretations results from conventional tests of intelligence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence, Competencies, and Learning)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Adaptive Intelligence: Intelligence is not a Personal Trait but rather a Person x Task x Situation Interaction
Authors: Robert J. Sternberg
Affiliation: Cornell University
Abstract: This article explores the advantages of viewing intelligence not as a fixed trait residing within an individual, but rather as a person x task x situation interaction. The emphasis in the article is on the role of situations. The article opens with a consideration of the role of situations in intelligent behavior. The article then discusses how intelligence is more similar to creativity and wisdom, in terms of the role of situations, than many psychologists have realized. Then the article reviews the role of situations in identity-based and irrational thinking and in conspiratorial thinking and cults. Next the article discusses the demonstrated importance of situations in assessment, but also notes the difficulties in sampling situations. Finally, the article draws conclusions, in particular, that given our lack of situationally-based tests, we need to be more modest in our interpretations results from conventional tests of intelligence.

Title: The Role of Prior Knowledge and Intelligence in Gaining From a Curriculum on Proportional Reasoning
Authors: Christian Thurn 1; Daniela Nussbaumer 2; Ralph Schumacher 3;  Elsbeth Stern 1
Affiliation: 1 Chair of Learning and Instruction, ETH Zurich, Switzerland;
2 University of Applied Sciences of Special Needs Zurich, Switzerland;
3 MINT Learning Center, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Abstract: We explore the mediating role of prior knowledge on the relation between intelligence and learning proportional reasoning. What students gain from formal instruction may depend on their intelligence as well as on prior encounters with proportions, such as the concept of density in physics. We investigated whether students who received a prior teaching unit on the concept of density had advantages in gaining from a curriculum on proportional reasoning in contrast to students who did not receive this prior teaching unit. We also varied the context used to introduce proportional reasoning (speed, density) in two consecutive randomized classroom studies (N1 = 251, N2 = 566 fourth- and fifth-graders), in which data on intelligence and mathematical competencies were collected. A Bayesian multilevel model revealed effects of intelligence as well as prior knowledge in mathematics and physics on understanding proportions, suggesting that more intelligent learners better exploit learning opportunities.

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