Special Issue "Exercise and Aging"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maria A. Fiatarone Singh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Exercise, Health and Rehabilitation Faculty Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 75 East Street, Lidcombe, NSW, 2141, Australia
Interests: exercise; nutrition; body composition; frailty
Prof. Dr. Clark Dickin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Kinesiology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, United States
Interests: biomechanics; motor control; balance; gait and posture; fatigue; aging; kinematics; kinetics
Prof. Dr. Brach Poston
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Interests: transcranial direct current stimulation; transcranial magnetic stimulation; Parkinson's disease; aging; force control; EMG; motor learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exercise and physical activity are potent strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease and disability in older adults. A robust literature including observational and empirical studies supports the role of physical activity and physical fitness as modulators of biological aging, disease expression, and optimization of functional independence and mental health and well-being across the lifespan.  However, all exercise is not alike, and the efficacy of this intervention is dependent upon the modality and dose applied, as well as the specific genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the cohort in some cases. In this issue, we will highlight new evidence about the unique role of exercise as related to aging, chronic disease, frailty, longevity, and optimal performance. We welcome submissions related to this topic including basic laboratory as well as applied clinical and epidemiological investigations.

Prof. Dr. Maria A. Fiatarone Singh
Prof. Dr. Clark Dickin
Prof. Dr. Brach Poston
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sarcopenia
  • aging
  • physical activity
  • health promotion
  • physical fitness
  • geriatric medicine

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A ‘Movement Screening Test’ of Functional Control Ability in Female Recreation Golfers and Non-Golfers over the Age of 80 Years: A Reliability Study
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3040054 - 07 Nov 2018
Abstract
Assessing function in elderly populations predominantly aims to quantify the risk of falling. Current assessment methods do not consider changes associated with aging in movement coordination patterns and the ability to control movement. The aim of this study was to examine the intra-rater [...] Read more.
Assessing function in elderly populations predominantly aims to quantify the risk of falling. Current assessment methods do not consider changes associated with aging in movement coordination patterns and the ability to control movement. The aim of this study was to examine the intra-rater reliability of a ‘Movement Screening Test’ (MST) in females over 80 years across a range of physical activity levels, who were golfers and non-golfers. Female recreational golfers (N = 21) and non-golfers (N = 10) aged 80 to 87 years performed the MST. The MST consists of three tests: Test 1, sit to stand with arm lift; Test 2, trunk lean with knee bend and opposite arm lift; Test 3, chest rotation with neutral head and pelvis. Videos of the MST were analyzed and scored according to specific criteria. The videos were reviewed on two separate occasions to quantify the intra-rater reliability of scoring of the MST. Intra-rater reliability ( κ ) of the MST demonstrated substantial agreement for 11/23 criteria ( κ = 0.65 and to 0.78) and excellent agreement for 9/23 criteria ( κ = 0.81 to 1). Therefore, the reliability of the MST for women aged 80 years and over was established. The MST test and scoring system may be further refined to improve reliability. Further investigations could explore coordination patterns in older people, how these relate to various aspects of musculoskeletal function, and how they vary between different populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Aging)
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Open AccessArticle
Perceived Barriers to Exercise in Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury Vary by Age
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3030047 - 14 Sep 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Physical activity and exercise are important adjuncts to medical treatment for overall health in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, many individuals do not partake in the recommended weekly exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate the barriers to exercise [...] Read more.
Physical activity and exercise are important adjuncts to medical treatment for overall health in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, many individuals do not partake in the recommended weekly exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate the barriers to exercise after TBI and determine whether these barriers varied by age. The sample was 172 adults with moderate to severe TBI who completed Barriers to Physical Exercise and Disability (B-PED) survey. Lack of interest, motivation, and energy as well as cost, lack of counseling on exercise by a physician, not having home equipment, and being too lazy were reported as barriers to exercise by all age groups. Those aged 35 to 54-years-old were more likely to report that cost, lack of transportation, having health concerns, not knowing where to exercise, and fear of leaving the home as barriers to exercise than those aged 18 to 34-years-old or 55-years-old and older. Overall, adults with TBI report multiple barriers to exercise, and these barriers vary by age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Aging)
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Open AccessArticle
Internal Loads, but Not External Loads and Fatigue, Are Similar in Young and Middle-Aged Resistance-Trained Males during High Volume Squatting Exercise
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3030045 - 22 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Little is known about the internal and external loads experienced during resistance exercise, or the subsequent fatigue-related response, across different age groups. This study compared the internal (heart rate, OMNI ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), session RPE) and external loads (peak velocity and [...] Read more.
Little is known about the internal and external loads experienced during resistance exercise, or the subsequent fatigue-related response, across different age groups. This study compared the internal (heart rate, OMNI ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), session RPE) and external loads (peak velocity and power and volume load) during high volume squatting exercise (10 × 10 at 60% one-repetition maximum (1RM)) and the fatigue-related response (maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), resting doublet force, peak power, and blood lactate) in young (n = 9; age 22.3 ± 1.7 years) and middle-aged (n = 9; age 39.9 ± 6.2 years) resistance-trained males. All internal load variables and peak velocity illustrated unclear differences between groups during exercise. Peak power and volume load were likely higher in the young group compared to their middle-aged counterparts. The unclear differences in MVC, VA and blood lactate between groups after exercise were accompanied by very likely greater decrements in resting doublet force and peak power at 20 and 80% 1RM in the middle-aged group compared to the young group. These data indicate that internal load is not different between young and middle-aged resistance-trained males, though certain external load measures and the fatigue response are. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Aging)
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Open AccessArticle
Physical Health Mediates the Relationship between Psychological Well-Being and Engagement in Exercise across Age in a German Sample
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3030039 - 03 Jul 2018
Abstract
The prevalence of chronic illness among middle-aged and older adults is increasing worldwide as the population continues to age. One way to prevent the continued increase and subsequent negative outcomes of chronic illness is to increase the number of individuals who engage in [...] Read more.
The prevalence of chronic illness among middle-aged and older adults is increasing worldwide as the population continues to age. One way to prevent the continued increase and subsequent negative outcomes of chronic illness is to increase the number of individuals who engage in exercise. Thus, it is important to examine which factors predict engagement in exercise in middle-aged and older adults. As a result, the current study examined the relationship between physical health, psychological well-being, and engagement in exercise in a sample of middle-aged and older German adults. We found that increased age was associated with less frequent engagement in exercise. We also found that physical health mediated the relationship between psychological well-being and engagement in exercise. Finally, we found that age did not moderate the relationship between subjective well-being and engagement in exercise, suggesting that the role of physical health as a mediator was similar in older adults compared to middle-aged adults. These findings have important implications for interventions seeking to promote exercise among adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Aging)
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