Special Issue "Medical Textiles"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Stephen J. Russell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare, School of Design, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
Fax: +44 113 343 3740
Interests: textile and nonwoven-based biomaterials as components in implantable; non-implantable and extracorporeal medical devices for healthcare and tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomaterials in the form of fibers, filaments, yarns, and fabrics serve a host of clinical needs as part of implantable, non-implantable, and extracorporeal devices spanning areas as diverse as tissue repair and regeneration, chronic wound healing, prosthetics, drug delivery, ostomy and blood filtration, amongst others. New fiber-based assemblies with rationally designed structures and properties are needed to address technical requirements in both existing and emerging clinical applications. Understanding material behavior and characterizing material architecture in physiological conditions is crucial to accomplishing successful clinical performances. This field includes, not only the development of new fiber components, but also the production of the three-dimensional fabric structures into which such components are assembled. Research encompasses developments in alternative polymer systems (particularly biopolymers, fiber-based vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic compounds, new fiber surface treatments and functionalization strategies, nanoparticle and biomolecule inclusions, biomimetic fibers and fiber assemblies, stimuli-responsive fiber-based materials, and the characterization of properties and functionalities in three-dimensional micro- or macroscopic textile architectures capable of being reproducibly manufactured. This Special Issue aims to consider all aspects of the manufacture, structure, and properties of textile-based biomaterials designed to interact with cells or biological fluids to facilitate the restoration of specific functions of the body, as well as for tissue repair and regeneration.

Prof. Dr. Stephen J. Russell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • textiles; fibers; filaments; yarns; fabrics; nonwovens.
  • biopolymers; fibers and fabrics
  • nanofibers; sub-micron fibers
  • manufacturing; fibers and fabrics
  • three-dimensional fiber assemblies
  • biomimetic structures
  • biomolecules
  • nanoparticles
  • fiber coatings; surface functionalisation
  • bicompatibility; biostability.
  • drug delivery
  • tissue engineering scaffolds
  • wound dressings
  • blood filtration
  • ostomy
  • prosthetic devices
  • in-vitro; in-vivo

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Compositional and in Vitro Evaluation of Nonwoven Type I Collagen/Poly-dl-lactic Acid Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(3), 667-686; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb6030667 - 05 Aug 2015
Cited by 13
Abstract
Poly-dl-lactic acid (PDLLA) was blended with type I collagen to attempt to overcome the instantaneous gelation of electrospun collagen scaffolds in biological environments. Scaffolds based on blends of type I collagen and PDLLA were investigated for material stability in cell culture conditions (37 [...] Read more.
Poly-dl-lactic acid (PDLLA) was blended with type I collagen to attempt to overcome the instantaneous gelation of electrospun collagen scaffolds in biological environments. Scaffolds based on blends of type I collagen and PDLLA were investigated for material stability in cell culture conditions (37 °C; 5% CO2) in which post-electrospinning glutaraldehyde crosslinking was also applied. The resulting wet-stable webs were cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) for five weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and biochemical assays were used to characterise the scaffolds and the consequent cell-scaffold constructs. To investigate any electrospinning-induced denaturation of collagen, identical PDLLA/collagen and PDLLA/gelatine blends were electrospun and their potential to promote osteogenic differentiation investigated. PDLLA/collagen blends with w/w ratios of 40/60, 60/40 and 80/20 resulted in satisfactory wet stabilities in a humid environment, although chemical crosslinking was essential to ensure long term material cell culture. Scaffolds of PDLLA/collagen at a 60:40 weight ratio provided the greatest stability over a five-week culture period. The PDLLA/collagen scaffolds promoted greater cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation compared to HMBSCs seeded on the corresponding PDLLA/gelatine scaffolds, suggesting that any electrospinning-induced collagen denaturation did not affect material biofunctionality within 5 weeks in vitro. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Textiles)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(3), 500-525; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb6030500 - 30 Jun 2015
Cited by 40
Abstract
Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent) is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to [...] Read more.
Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent) is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Textiles)
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Open AccessReview
Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(2), 204-221; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb6020204 - 13 Apr 2015
Cited by 56
Abstract
The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) [...] Read more.
The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Textiles)
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