Clinic Advances in Invasive Fungal Diseases

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 3838

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department I of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Aachen Bonn Cologne Duesseldorf, Excellence Center for Medical Mycology (ECMM), University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
Interests: fungal infections; registries; epidemiology; public health; antifungals; mycoses; COVID-19; hematology; HIV; mucormycosis; rare fungi; rare molds; rare yeasts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive fungal diseases are opportunistic infections constituting a major life threat in  patients  with  different  underlying  conditions,  such  as  hematological  and  oncological malignancies, solid organ transplantation, long-term immunosuppression, or even viral infections, such as influenza and COVID-19. Physicians are often confronted with a complex variety of fungal pathogens, the treatment recommendations for which are not always clear. Moreover, outbreaks of invasive fungal diseases are an increasing threat that can challenge clinical management strategies. Additionally, new human pathogenic species are being described, which have the potential for misidentification due to similarities in morphology or pathogenicity with other already-described fungi. Furthermore, depending on the patient’s region, there might be huge variance in many different relevant aspects, such as predisposing factors, signs and symptoms, diagnostic tools, and antifungal treatment strategies, which might jeopardize the clinical management of the infection.

The current Special Issue aims to decipher, depict and describe the latest scientific advances in any of the aspects related to the clinical management of invasive fungal diseases.

Dr. Jon Salmanton-Garcia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • invasive fungal diseases
  • antifungal treatment
  • mould
  • yeast
  • epidemiology
  • outbreak
  • registry
  • intensive care unit
  • immunosuppression

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

8 pages, 434 KiB  
Review
Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria and Aspergillus Lung Co-Infection: Systematic Review
by Marina Fayos, Jose Tiago Silva, Francisco López-Medrano and José María Aguado
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(19), 5619; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11195619 - 23 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1760
Abstract
Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and Aspergillus pulmonary co-infection occurs in patients with underlying lung disease and is rarely reported. We conducted a systematic search of NTM and Aspergillus pulmonary co-infection in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library to identify cases published from 1977 to May [...] Read more.
Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and Aspergillus pulmonary co-infection occurs in patients with underlying lung disease and is rarely reported. We conducted a systematic search of NTM and Aspergillus pulmonary co-infection in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library to identify cases published from 1977 to May 2022. We included 507 articles comprising 1538 cases (only 817 patients with partial relevant clinical data). Of these, 54.3% of patients were men, with a mean age of 57.7 years. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (21.1%), previous diagnosis of tuberculosis (18%), and asthma (11.1%) were the most common chronic lung diseases, and corticosteroids were used in 36.8% of patients. The most frequent symptoms were cough (68.2%), dyspnea (59.1%), and hemoptysis (34.1%). The most common radiological findings were bronchiectasis (52.3%) and cavitation (40.8%). NTM and Aspergillus were treated simultaneously in 47.3% of cases, whereas NTM-targeted therapy only was performed in 23.4% and Aspergillus only in 1.6%. The remaining 27.7% did not receive any treatment and were considered to be colonized. The global mortality rate was 43% (159/370). There was an increased prevalence of NTM and pulmonary aspergillosis among patients with underlying chronic lung diseases, which led to severe pulmonary affection with a poor global prognosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinic Advances in Invasive Fungal Diseases)
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11 pages, 1290 KiB  
Review
Role of Iron and Iron Overload in the Pathogenesis of Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies
by Toni Valković and Marija Stanić Damić
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(15), 4457; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11154457 - 30 Jul 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1633
Abstract
Iron is an essential trace metal necessary for the reproduction and survival of fungal pathogens. The latter have developed various mechanisms to acquire iron from their mammalian hosts, with whom they participate in a continuous struggle for dominance over iron. Invasive fungal infections [...] Read more.
Iron is an essential trace metal necessary for the reproduction and survival of fungal pathogens. The latter have developed various mechanisms to acquire iron from their mammalian hosts, with whom they participate in a continuous struggle for dominance over iron. Invasive fungal infections are an important problem in the treatment of patients with hematological malignancies, and they are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of invasive clinical infections in these patients is complex, and the treatment, which must occur as early as possible, is difficult. There are several studies that have shown a possible link between iron overload and an increased susceptibility to infections. This link is also relevant for patients with hematological malignancies and for those treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The role of iron and its metabolism in the virulence and pathogenesis of various invasive fungal infections is intriguing, and so far, there is some evidence linking invasive fungal infections to iron or iron overload. Clarifying the possible association of iron and iron overload with susceptibility to invasive fungal infections could be important for a better prevention and treatment of these infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinic Advances in Invasive Fungal Diseases)
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