Recent Advances in the Management of Colorectal Cancer

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1499

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of General Surgery, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
2. Institute of Oncology Prof. Dr. Alexandru Trestioreanu, Șoseaua Fundeni 252, 022328 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: gastrointestinal malignancies; colorectal cancer; surgical oncology

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Guest Editor
Pathology Department of the "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: colorectal cancer; colorectal surgery; cancer diagnostics; immunohistochemistry; surgical oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to announce a new Special Issue entitled “Recent Advances in the Management of Colorectal Cancer” for the Journal of Clinical Medicine. Colorectal Cancer (CRC) ranks as the third most prevalent form of cancer globally and represents a significant contributor to cancer-related deaths. In recent years, the management of colorectal cancer has made significant advances. This has been achieved, on the one hand, due to the thorough research conducted on colorectal cancer by clinicians, surgeons, and pathologists; on the other hand, significant progress has been achieved in conjunction with advancements in surgical techniques, the accumulation of surgical expertise, and the implementation of multidisciplinary treatments.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present recent advances in the multidisciplinary approach to colorectal cancer and the assessment of clinicopathological patterns in colorectal cancer. Therefore, we kindly invite you to contribute to the topics of this Special Issue and submit your manuscripts (review or original), in order to enhance and update the scientific knowledge related to this fascinating field.

Prof. Dr. Octav Ginghinǎ
Dr. Mihai Constantin Ceausu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • colorectal cancer
  • gastrointestinal malignancies
  • colorectal surgery
  • surgical oncology
  • treatment modalities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 1032 KiB  
Article
A Glimpse into the Role and Effectiveness of Splenectomy for Isolated Metachronous Spleen Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer Origin: Long-Term Survivals Can Be Achieved
by Beatrice Mihaela Tivadar, Traian Dumitrascu and Catalin Vasilescu
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(8), 2362; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13082362 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Many papers exploring the role of resectioning metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) have focused mainly on liver and lung sites, showing improved survival compared with non-resectional therapies. However, data about exceptional metastatic sites such as splenic metastases (SMs) are scarce. This [...] Read more.
Background: Many papers exploring the role of resectioning metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) have focused mainly on liver and lung sites, showing improved survival compared with non-resectional therapies. However, data about exceptional metastatic sites such as splenic metastases (SMs) are scarce. This paper aims to assess the role and effectiveness of splenectomy in the case of isolated metachronous SM of CRC origin. Methods: The patients’ data were extracted after a comprehensive literature search through public databases for articles reporting patients with splenectomies for isolated metachronous SM of CRC origin. Potential predictors of survival were explored, along with demographic, diagnostic, pathology, and treatment data for each patient. Results: A total of 83 patients with splenectomies for isolated metachronous SM of CRC origin were identified. The primary CRC was at an advanced stage (Duke’s C—70.3%) and on the left colon (45.5%) for most patients, while the median interval between CRC resection and SM was 24 months. The median overall survival after splenectomy was 84 months, and patients younger than 62 years presented statistically significantly worse overall survival rates than those ≥62 years old (p = 0.011). There was no significant impact on the long-term outcomes for factors including primary tumor location or adjuvant chemotherapy (p values ≥ 0.070, ns). Laparoscopic splenectomy was increasingly used in the last 20 years from 2002 (33.3% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Splenectomy is the optimal treatment for patients with isolated metachronous SM of CRC, with the laparoscopic approach being increasingly used and having the potential to become a standard of care. Encouraging long-term survival rates were reported in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Younger ages are associated with worse survival. Perioperative chemotherapy in the context of a patient diagnosed with SM of CRC origin appears to be a reasonable option, although the present study failed to show any significant impact on long-term survival. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Management of Colorectal Cancer)
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Review

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17 pages, 2157 KiB  
Review
Pancreaticoduodenectomies with Concurrent Colectomies: Indications, Technical Issues, Complications, and Oncological Outcomes
by Traian Dumitrascu
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(24), 7682; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12247682 - 14 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Multi-visceral resections for colon and pancreatic cancer (PDAC) are feasible, safe, and justified for early and late outcomes. However, the use of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with concurrent colectomies is highly debatable in terms of morbidity and oncological benefits. Based on current literature data, this [...] Read more.
Multi-visceral resections for colon and pancreatic cancer (PDAC) are feasible, safe, and justified for early and late outcomes. However, the use of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with concurrent colectomies is highly debatable in terms of morbidity and oncological benefits. Based on current literature data, this review assesses the early and long-term outcomes of PD with colectomies. The association represents a challenging but feasible option for a few patients with PDAC or locally advanced right colon cancer when negative resection margins are anticipated because long-term survival can be achieved. Concurrent colectomies during PD should be cautiously approached because they may significantly increase complication rates, including severe ones. Thus, patients should be fit enough to overcome potential severe complications. Patients with PD and colectomies can be classified as borderline resectable, considering the high risk of developing postoperative complications. Carefully selecting patients suitable for PD with concurrent colectomies is paramount to mitigate the potentially severe complications of the two surgical procedures and maximize the oncological benefits. These procedures should be performed at high-volume centers with extensive experience in pancreatectomies and colectomies, and each patient situation should be assessed using a multimodal approach, including high-quality imaging and neoadjuvant therapies, in a multidisciplinary team discussion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Management of Colorectal Cancer)
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