The Clinical Perspective on Pregnancy Complications and Symptoms

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1038

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Maternal and Child Health, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 33 Polna Street, 60-535 Poznań, Poland
Interests: gynecology; uro-gynecology; laparoscopy; hysteroscopy

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Guest Editor
Department of Mother’s and Child’s Health, Gynecologic and Obstetrical University Hospital, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna St 33, 60‐535 Poznan, Poland
Interests: pregnancy; gynecology; uro-gynecology; laparoscopy; hysteroscopy

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Guest Editor
Department and Clinic of Mother and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 33 Polna Street, PL 60-535 Poznań, Poland
Interests: pregnancy; gynecology; uro-gynecology; laparoscopy; hysteroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The majority of pregnancies indeed have positive outcomes for both mothers and babies. However, it is important to acknowledge that significant complications during pregnancy persist, and their occurrence rates have remained relatively stable. These complications, including preeclampsia, preterm birth, stillbirth, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), affect more than 12% of pregnancies worldwide. It is crucial we recognize that these complications have detrimental effects on both maternal and neonatal health, with potential short- and long-term consequences.

In recent years, numerous research groups have focused on exploring novel or existing methods to address these complications. The ultimate aim is to enhance the overall health of pregnancies and improve neonatal outcomes. However, despite these advancements, there are still many challenges that need to be addressed.

This Special Issue welcomes the submission of papers that discuss current advances in prenatal diagnostics and explore knowledge gaps in the development of novel therapeutic strategies from a clinical perspective. Topics of interest include the care of pregnant women, alternative methods for relieving labor pain, methods of fertility regulation, and innovations in diagnostic tests and preventive programs in gynecology.

Dr. Karolina Chmaj-Wierzchowska
Dr. Katarzyna Tomczyk
Prof. Dr. Maciej Wilczak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • pregnant
  • fertility regulation
  • pregnancy complications
  • symptoms

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 1886 KiB  
Article
The CHANGED Score—A New Tool for the Prediction of Insulin Dependency in Gestational Diabetes
by Paul Rostin, Selina Balke, Dorota Sroka, Laura Fangmann, Petra Weid, Wolfgang Henrich and Josefine Theresia Königbauer
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 7169; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12227169 - 18 Nov 2023
Viewed by 875
Abstract
Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a frequent complication during pregnancy. We aimed to develop a score to predict future insulin dependency in gestational diabetes (GDM). Data from 1611 patients from Charité Berlins gestational diabetes clinic from 2015 to 2022 were utilized. A stepwise backwards [...] Read more.
Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a frequent complication during pregnancy. We aimed to develop a score to predict future insulin dependency in gestational diabetes (GDM). Data from 1611 patients from Charité Berlins gestational diabetes clinic from 2015 to 2022 were utilized. A stepwise backwards regression, including patient characteristics obtained at the initial presentation, was performed. Predictors examined included age, fasting blood glucose level, blood glucose levels one and two hours after oral glucose tolerance test, pre-pregnancy BMI, number of previous pregnancies and births, and fetal sex. The ideal cutoff value between high and low risk for insulin dependency was assessed and the score was internally validated. There were 1249 (77.5%) women diagnosed with dietary GDM and 362 (22.5%) were diagnosed with insulin-dependent GDM. The CHarité AssessmeNt of GEstational Diabetes (CHANGED) Score achieved an area under the curve of 0.77 (95% confidence interval 0.75–0.80; 0.75 in internal validation). The optimal cutoff value was calculated at a score value of 9 (72% sensitivity, 69% specificity). We developed an easily applicable tool to accurately predict insulin dependency in gestational diabetes. The CHANGED Score is routinely available and can potentially improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Clinical Perspective on Pregnancy Complications and Symptoms)
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