Special Issue "Control of House Flies and Stable Flies"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jerome A. Hogsette
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, 1600 S. W. 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA
Tel. (352)374-5912
Interests: biology, ecology and control of Synanthropic flies
Dr. David B. Taylor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USDA-ARS-PA-Agroecosystem Management Research Unit, 251 Filley Hall/Food Ind. Complex, UNL, East Campus, Lincoln, NE 68583 , USA
Interests: population ecology, genetics and management of flies affecting livestock production
Dr. Dana Nayduch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USDA-ARS-PA-Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research Unit, 1515 College Ave. Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Tel. 7855375566
Interests: biology of Dipteran disease vectors; fly-microbe interactions; genomics, transcriptomics and microbiome analysis of Dipteran pests affecting livestock and humans

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

House flies and stable flies are of utmost importance nationally and internationally because of the adverse effects they have on people and their animals. House flies are notorious for their ability to transmit pathogens and because of the nuisance factor they create for people and animals alike. Stable flies are known for their persistent blood-feeding behavior and the accompanying pain and discomfort. Both sexes take blood and hosts includes humans, their pets and domestic and exotic animals worldwide. Life-threatening outbreaks in several countries have been attributed to byproducts of large-scale crop and animal agriculture. This special issue will focus on management of these flies through increased knowledge of their biology, behavior, and genetics, and by using devices and techniques which minimize the use of pesticides.

Dr. Jerome A. Hogsette
Dr. David B. Taylor
Dr. Dana Nayduch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • house flies
  • stable flies
  • management
  • physiology
  • molecular biology
  • biological control
  • behavior
  • chemical ecology (attractants and repellents)
  • biology and ecology
  • pathogens and parasites
  • toxicology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
House Flies (Musca domestica) Pose a Risk of Carriage and Transmission of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD)
Insects 2019, 10(10), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100358 - 18 Oct 2019
Abstract
House flies are important nuisance pests in a variety of confined livestock operations. More importantly, house flies are known mechanical vectors of numerous animal and human pathogens. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important, complex illness of cattle associated with several bacteria [...] Read more.
House flies are important nuisance pests in a variety of confined livestock operations. More importantly, house flies are known mechanical vectors of numerous animal and human pathogens. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important, complex illness of cattle associated with several bacteria and viruses. The role of flies in the ecology and transmission of bacterial pathogens associated with BRD is not understood. Using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, we examined the prevalence of the BRD bacterial complex Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in house flies collected in a commercial feedlot from a pen with cattle exhibiting apparent BRD symptoms. Using both methods, M. haemolytica was detected in 11.7% of house flies, followed by P. multocida (5.0%) and H. somni (3.3%). The presence of BRD bacterial pathogens in house flies suggests that this insect plays a role in the ecology of BRD pathogens and could pose a risk as a potential reservoir and/or a vector of BRD pathogens among individual cattle and in their environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control of House Flies and Stable Flies)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Diet Quality and Temperature on Stable Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Development
Insects 2019, 10(7), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10070207 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
The effects of diet quality and temperature on the development time and size of stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), was evaluated. Both development time and size varied relative to diet quality and temperature, and their effects were additive. Diet quality and temperature made [...] Read more.
The effects of diet quality and temperature on the development time and size of stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), was evaluated. Both development time and size varied relative to diet quality and temperature, and their effects were additive. Diet quality and temperature made similar contributions to the variance in size whereas temperature was responsible for >97% of the variance in development time. Regression analysis predicted the shortest development time, egg to adult, to be 12.7 days at 32 °C and 70% nutrients. Egg to adult development varied curvilinearly relative to diet quality and temperature on the degree day 10 (DD10) scale taking 261 DD10 at 30 °C and 50% nutrients. The thermal threshold was 11.5 °C with a thermal constant of 248. Very few stable flies developed to adult on the poorest diet (12.5% nutrients) and adults emerged from fewer than 1% of the puparia at 35 °C. The heaviest pupae (15.4 mg) were produced with the 100% diet at 15 °C and adults had a higher probability of emerging successfully from heavier puparia. The length of the discal-medial cell of adult wings had a cubic relationship with puparia weight and peaked at 21 °C. Egg to pupariation survival was predicted to peak at 27 °C and 71% diet whereas puparia to adult survival peaked at 24 °C and 100% diet. Diet quality and temperature had no effect on sex ratio and the rate of development did not differ between the sexes. Female stable flies were ≈5% larger than males. Composite metrics for egg to pupariation and egg to adult fitness were developed. The optimum for puparia fitness was 29 °C and 78% diet quality and for adult fitness 25 °C and 83% diet quality. Diet accounted for 31% of the variance in pupal fitness and 24% of the variance in adult fitness whereas temperature accounted for 17% and 20%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control of House Flies and Stable Flies)
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