Special Issue "Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Daniel A. Herms

The Davey Tree Expert Company, Kent, Ohio, USA
E-Mail
Interests: Forest Insects; Urban Forest and Shade Tree Insects; Invasion Ecology; Tree-Insect Interactions; Tree Resistance to Insects
Guest Editor
Dr. Kenneth F. Raffa

Professor Dept. of Entomology & Beers-Bascom Professor of Conservation Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 345 Russell Laboratories, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-608-262-1125
Interests: Forest entomology; Plant-Insect interactions; Insect ecology; Biological control; Symbioses; Invasive species
Guest Editor
Dr. Kayla I. Perry

Department of Entomology, The Ohio State University
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Insect Ecology; Invasive Species; Disturbance Ecology; Forest Entomology; Biodiversity and Conservation of Insects; Soil ecology; Carabidae

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change, disturbance events, invasive species, and patterns of land use are among key drivers that interact to impact the distribution, abundance, and evolution of forest insects in a changing world.  This Special Issue of Insects will broadly address the effects of global change on ecology and management of insects along a gradient of wilderness, managed, plantation, and urban forests.  We invite submissions, including reviews and primary research reports, that address effects and implications of environmental change on insects in forest ecosystems including community and population ecology, biodiversity and conservation, biological invasions, ecosystem services, and pest management.

Dr. Daniel A. Herms
Prof. Dr. Kenneth F. Raffa
Dr. Kayla I. Perry
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest entomology
  • climate change
  • disturbance
  • land use change
  • invasive species
  • community ecology
  • population dynamics
  • tree-insect interactions
  • biodiversity
  • pest management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Current Status of Forest Health Policy in the United States
Insects 2019, 10(4), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10040106
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 6 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
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Abstract
Federal policies related to forestry and forest health (specifically, insects and diseases) have the potential to affect management practices, terms of international and interstate trade, and long-term sustainability and conservation. Our objectives were to review existing federal policies, the role of federal agencies [...] Read more.
Federal policies related to forestry and forest health (specifically, insects and diseases) have the potential to affect management practices, terms of international and interstate trade, and long-term sustainability and conservation. Our objectives were to review existing federal policies, the role of federal agencies in managing forest health, and guidance for future policy efforts. Since the 1940s, various federal policies relevant to forest health have been established, and several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) agencies have been empowered to assist with prevention, quarantine, detection, management, and control of insects and diseases. Overall, our review showed that relatively few national policies directly address forest health as a stand-alone objective, as most of them are embedded within forestry bills. Federal funding for forest health issues and the number of personnel dedicated to such issues have declined dramatically for some agencies. Concomitantly, native species continue to gain pestiferous status while non-native species continue to establish and cause impacts in the US. To enhance our ability and capacity to deal with current and future threats, concerted efforts are needed to advocate for both resources and stand-alone policy tools that take seriously the complexity of emerging sustainability challenges in both private and public forestlands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World)
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Open AccessCommunication
Limited Genetic Structure of Gypsy Moth Populations Reflecting a Recent History in Europe
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1420 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, a prominent polyphagous species native to Eurasia, causes severe impacts in deciduous forests during irregular periodical outbreaks. This study aimed to describe the genetic structure and diversity among European gypsy moth populations. Analysis of about 500 individuals [...] Read more.
The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, a prominent polyphagous species native to Eurasia, causes severe impacts in deciduous forests during irregular periodical outbreaks. This study aimed to describe the genetic structure and diversity among European gypsy moth populations. Analysis of about 500 individuals using a partial region of the mitochondrial COI gene, L. dispar was characterized by low genetic diversity, limited population structure, and strong evidence that all extant haplogroups arose via a single Holocene population expansion event. Overall 60 haplotypes connected to a single parsimony network were detected and genetic diversity was highest for the coastal populations Croatia, Italy, and France, while lowest in continental populations. Phylogenetic reconstruction resulted in three groups that were geographically located in Central Europe, Dinaric Alps, and the Balkan Peninsula. In addition to recent events, the genetic structure reflects strong gene flow and the ability of gypsy moth to feed on about 400 deciduous and conifer species. Distinct genetic groups were detected in populations from Georgia. This remote population exhibited haplotypes intermediate to the European L. dispar dispar, Asian L. dispar asiatica, and L. dispar japonica clusters, highlighting this area as a possible hybridization zone of this species for future studies applying genomic approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dynamic Responses of Ground-Dwelling Invertebrate Communities to Disturbance in Forest Ecosystems
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (752 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In forest ecosystems, natural and anthropogenic disturbances alter canopy structure, understory vegetation, amount of woody debris, and the properties of litter and soil layers. The magnitude of these environmental changes is context-dependent and determined by the properties of the disturbance, such as the [...] Read more.
In forest ecosystems, natural and anthropogenic disturbances alter canopy structure, understory vegetation, amount of woody debris, and the properties of litter and soil layers. The magnitude of these environmental changes is context-dependent and determined by the properties of the disturbance, such as the frequency, intensity, duration, and extent. Therefore, disturbances can dynamically impact forest communities over time, including populations of ground-dwelling invertebrates that regulate key ecosystem processes. We propose conceptual models that describe the dynamic temporal effects of canopy gap formation and coarse woody debris accumulation following disturbances caused by invasive insects, wind, and salvage logging, and their impacts on ground-dwelling invertebrate communities. Within this framework, predictions are generated, literature on ground-dwelling invertebrate communities is synthesized, and pertinent knowledge gaps identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World)
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Open AccessReview
The Past, Present, and Future of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) and Its Ecological Interactions with Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) Forests
Received: 23 October 2018 / Revised: 12 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 23 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The nonnative hemlock woolly adelgid is steadily killing eastern hemlock trees in many parts of eastern North America. We summarize impacts of the adelgid on these forest foundation species; review previous models and analyses of adelgid spread dynamics; and examine how previous forecasts [...] Read more.
The nonnative hemlock woolly adelgid is steadily killing eastern hemlock trees in many parts of eastern North America. We summarize impacts of the adelgid on these forest foundation species; review previous models and analyses of adelgid spread dynamics; and examine how previous forecasts of adelgid spread and ecosystem dynamics compare with current conditions. The adelgid has reset successional sequences, homogenized biological diversity at landscape scales, altered hydrological dynamics, and changed forest stands from carbon sinks into carbon sources. A new model better predicts spread of the adelgid in the south and west of the range of hemlock, but still under-predicts its spread in the north and east. Whether these underpredictions result from inadequately modeling accelerating climate change or accounting for people inadvertently moving the adelgid into new locales needs further study. Ecosystem models of adelgid-driven hemlock dynamics have consistently forecast that forest carbon stocks will be little affected by the shift from hemlock to early-successional mixed hardwood stands, but these forecasts have assumed that the intermediate stages will remain carbon sinks. New forecasting models of adelgid-driven hemlock decline should account for observed abrupt changes in carbon flux and ongoing and accelerating human-driven land-use and climatic changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World)
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