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Limited Genetic Structure of Gypsy Moth Populations Reflecting a Recent History in Europe

1
Croatian Forest Research Institute, Cvjetno naselje 41, 10450 Jastrebarsko, Croatia
2
UMR CNRS-UFC 6249 Chrono-Environment, Université de Franche Comte, 25200 Montbéliard, France
3
Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
4
Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, A-1180 Vienna, Austria
5
Forest Research Institute, Hellenic Agricultural Organization Demeter, Vasilika, 57006 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2018, 9(4), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9040143
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Management of Forest Insects in a Changing World)
The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, a prominent polyphagous species native to Eurasia, causes severe impacts in deciduous forests during irregular periodical outbreaks. This study aimed to describe the genetic structure and diversity among European gypsy moth populations. Analysis of about 500 individuals using a partial region of the mitochondrial COI gene, L. dispar was characterized by low genetic diversity, limited population structure, and strong evidence that all extant haplogroups arose via a single Holocene population expansion event. Overall 60 haplotypes connected to a single parsimony network were detected and genetic diversity was highest for the coastal populations Croatia, Italy, and France, while lowest in continental populations. Phylogenetic reconstruction resulted in three groups that were geographically located in Central Europe, Dinaric Alps, and the Balkan Peninsula. In addition to recent events, the genetic structure reflects strong gene flow and the ability of gypsy moth to feed on about 400 deciduous and conifer species. Distinct genetic groups were detected in populations from Georgia. This remote population exhibited haplotypes intermediate to the European L. dispar dispar, Asian L. dispar asiatica, and L. dispar japonica clusters, highlighting this area as a possible hybridization zone of this species for future studies applying genomic approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest pest; population genetics; population outbreaks; range shift; admixture forest pest; population genetics; population outbreaks; range shift; admixture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lacković, N.; Pernek, M.; Bertheau, C.; Franjević, D.; Stauffer, C.; Avtzis, D.N. Limited Genetic Structure of Gypsy Moth Populations Reflecting a Recent History in Europe. Insects 2018, 9, 143. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9040143

AMA Style

Lacković N, Pernek M, Bertheau C, Franjević D, Stauffer C, Avtzis DN. Limited Genetic Structure of Gypsy Moth Populations Reflecting a Recent History in Europe. Insects. 2018; 9(4):143. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9040143

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lacković, Nikola, Milan Pernek, Coralie Bertheau, Damjan Franjević, Christian Stauffer, and Dimitrios N. Avtzis 2018. "Limited Genetic Structure of Gypsy Moth Populations Reflecting a Recent History in Europe" Insects 9, no. 4: 143. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9040143

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