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Special Issue "Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sadanori Akita
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plastic Surgery, Wound Repair and Regeneration, Fukuoka University, School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 8140180, Japan
Interests: wound healing; skin; wounds; adipose-derived stem cell therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wound healing plays an integral part in cellular and molecular events. This process is implicated in regeneration. Regeneration is also a process of restoring defects and disfigurement towards the original or more ideal states by cells, molecules and environmental factors. Cellular and molecular events are orchestrated both spatially and temporally. When targeting each disease, understanding wound healing and the process of regeneration, as well as the findings of pathophysiology will deliver a new insights into realistic novel therapeutic options.

This Special Issue calls for original articles, reviews, and perspectives that address the current knowledge and progress in the field of wound healing and regeneration by conventional approaches as well as highly technologically advanced approaches. These include, but are not limited to, the fields that are mentioned in the keywords.

Prof. Dr. Sadanori Akita
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wound healing
  • regeneration
  • disease
  • pathophsyiogy
  • therapy
  • temporal
  • spatial

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
B-Cell Activating Factor Enhances Hepatocyte-Driven Angiogenesis via B-Cell CLL/Lymphoma 10/Nuclear Factor-KappaB Signaling during Liver Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5022; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205022 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is found to be associated with the histological severity of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). BAFF was also found to have a protective role in hepatic steatosis via down regulating the expression of steatogenesis genes and enhancing steatosis in hepatocytes through [...] Read more.
B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is found to be associated with the histological severity of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). BAFF was also found to have a protective role in hepatic steatosis via down regulating the expression of steatogenesis genes and enhancing steatosis in hepatocytes through BAFF-R. However, the roles of BAFF during liver regeneration are not well defined. In this study, C57/B6 mice with 70% partial hepatectomy were used as a liver regeneration model. BAFF expression was determined by enzyme immunoassay, and anti-BAFF-neutralizing antibodies were administered to confirm the effects of BAFF on liver regeneration. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and florescence staining determined the expression of B-cell CCL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10). The angiogenesis promoting capability was evaluated after the transfection of cells with siRNA targeting BCL10 expression, and the role of NF-κB was assessed. The results revealed that the BAFF and BCL10 levels were upregulated after partial hepatectomy. Treatment with anti-BAFF-neutralizing antibodies caused death in mice that were subjected to 70% partial hepatectomy within 72 h. In vitro, recombinant BAFF protein did not enhance hepatocyte proliferation; however, transfection with BCL10 siRNA arrested hepatocytes at the G2/M phase. Interestingly, conditioned medium from BAFF-treated hepatocytes enhanced angiogenesis and endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), Fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4), and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) proteins were upregulated by BAFF through BCL10/NF-κB signaling. In mice that were treated with anti-BAFF-neutralizing antibodies, the microvessel density (MVD) of the remaining liver tissues and liver regeneration were both reduced. Taken together, our study demonstrated that an increased expression of BAFF and activation of BCL10/NF-κB signaling were involved in hepatocyte-driven angiogenesis and survival during liver regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling)
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Open AccessArticle
Cloning, Expression and Effects of P. americana Thymosin on Wound Healing
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4932; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194932 - 05 Oct 2019
Abstract
The American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is a medicinal insect. Its extract is used clinically to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration, but the effective medicinal components and mechanisms are not yet clear. It has been reported that human thymosin beta 4 [...] Read more.
The American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is a medicinal insect. Its extract is used clinically to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration, but the effective medicinal components and mechanisms are not yet clear. It has been reported that human thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) may accelerate skin wound healing, however, the role of P. americana thymosin (Pa-THYs) is still poorly understood. In the present study, we identify and analyze the DNA sequences of Pa-THYs by bioinformatics analysis. Then we clone, express, and purify the Pa-THYs proteins and evaluate the activity of recombinant Pa-THYs proteins by cell migration and proliferation assays in NIH/3T3 cells. To elucidate the role of Pa-THYs in wound healing, a mouse model is established, and we evaluate wound contraction, histopathological parameters, and the expressions of several key growth factors after Pa-THYs treatment. Our results showed that three THY variants were formed by skipping splicing of exons. Pa-THYs could promote fibroblast migration, but have no effect on fibroblast proliferation. In wound repair, Pa-THYs proteins could effectively promote wound healing through stimulating dermal tissue regeneration, angiogenesis, and collagen deposition. On the molecular mechanism, Pa-THYs also stimulated the expression of several key growth factors to promote wound healing. The data suggest that Pa-THYs could be a potential drug for promoting wound repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling)
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Open AccessArticle
Local Growth Hormone Therapy for Pressure Ulcer Healing on a Human Skin Mouse Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(17), 4157; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20174157 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
The growth hormone is involved in skin homeostasis and wound healing. We hypothesize whether it is possible to improve pressure ulcer (PU) healing by locally applying the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in a human skin mouse model. Non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice [...] Read more.
The growth hormone is involved in skin homeostasis and wound healing. We hypothesize whether it is possible to improve pressure ulcer (PU) healing by locally applying the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in a human skin mouse model. Non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice (n = 10) were engrafted with a full-thickness human skin graft. After 60 days with stable grafts, human skin underwent three cycles of ischemia-reperfusion with a compression device to create a PU. Mice were classified into two groups: rhGH treatment group (n = 5) and control group (n = 5). In the rhGH group for local intradermal injections, each had 0.15 mg (0.5IU) applied to the PU edges, once per week for four weeks. Evaluation of the wound healing was conducted with photographic and visual assessments, and histological analysis was performed after complete wound healing. The results showed a healing rate twice as fast in the rhGH group compared to the control group (1.25 ± 0.33 mm2/day versus 0.61 ± 0.27 mm2/day; p-value < 0.05), with a faster healing rate during the first 30 days. The rhGH group showed thicker skin (1953 ± 457 µm versus 1060 ± 208 µm; p-value < 0.05) in the repaired area, with a significant decrease in collagen type I/III ratio at wound closure (62 days, range 60–70). Local administration of the rhGH accelerates PU healing in our model. The rhGH may have a clinical use in pressure ulcer treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling)
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Open AccessArticle
Matrisome Properties of Scaffolds Direct Fibroblasts in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(16), 4013; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20164013 - 17 Aug 2019
Abstract
In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) structural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are altered and influence cellular responses through cell-matrix interactions. Scaffolds (decellularized tissue) derived from subpleural healthy and IPF lungs were examined regarding biomechanical properties and ECM composition of proteins (the matrisome). [...] Read more.
In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) structural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are altered and influence cellular responses through cell-matrix interactions. Scaffolds (decellularized tissue) derived from subpleural healthy and IPF lungs were examined regarding biomechanical properties and ECM composition of proteins (the matrisome). Scaffolds were repopulated with healthy fibroblasts cultured under static stretch with heavy isotope amino acids (SILAC), to examine newly synthesized proteins over time. IPF scaffolds were characterized by increased tissue density, stiffness, ultimate force, and differential expressions of matrisome proteins compared to healthy scaffolds. Collagens, proteoglycans, and ECM glycoproteins were increased in IPF scaffolds, however while specific basement membrane (BM) proteins such as laminins and collagen IV were decreased, nidogen-2 was also increased. Findings were confirmed with histology, clearly showing a disorganized BM. Fibroblasts produced scaffold-specific proteins mimicking preexisting scaffold composition, where 11 out of 20 BM proteins were differentially expressed, along with increased periostin and proteoglycans production. We demonstrate how matrisome changes affect fibroblast activity using novel approaches to study temporal differences, where IPF scaffolds support a disorganized BM and upregulation of disease-associated proteins. These matrix-directed cellular responses emphasize the IPF matrisome and specifically the BM components as important factors for disease progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling)
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Open AccessArticle
Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Facilitates Skin Wound Healing by Increasing Angiogenesis and Inflammatory Cell Recruitment with Less Scar Formation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(14), 3381; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20143381 - 10 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Wound healing starts with the recruitment of inflammatory cells that secrete wound-related factors. This step is followed by fibroblast activation and tissue construction. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid mediator that promotes angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and attracts immune cells. We investigated the roles of [...] Read more.
Wound healing starts with the recruitment of inflammatory cells that secrete wound-related factors. This step is followed by fibroblast activation and tissue construction. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid mediator that promotes angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and attracts immune cells. We investigated the roles of S1P in skin wound healing by altering the expression of its biogenic enzyme, sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1). The murine excisional wound splinting model was used. Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) was highly expressed in murine wounds and that SphK1−/− mice exhibit delayed wound closure along with less angiogenesis and inflammatory cell recruitment. Nanoparticle-mediated topical SphK1 overexpression accelerated wound closure, which associated with increased angiogenesis, inflammatory cell recruitment, and various wound-related factors. The SphK1 overexpression also led to less scarring, and the interaction between transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and S1P receptor-2 (S1PR2) signaling is likely to play a key role. In summary, SphK1 play important roles to strengthen immunity, and contributes early wound healing with suppressed scarring. S1P can be a novel therapeutic molecule with anti-scarring effect in surgical, trauma, and chronic wound management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration: Mechanisms, Signaling)
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