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Special Issue "The Promise of Precision Oncology: Molecular Strategies, Methods, Pharmacogenomics and Informatics"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Eddy S. Yang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
Interests: PARP, DNA repair, BRCA1, BRCA2, EGFR, synthetic lethality, experimental therapeutics, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Precision medicine is an increasingly critical aspect of cancer care for our patients. Existing models use genomics to tailor patient treatment based on the presence of actionable tumor driver mutations. Using tumor sequencing to direct therapy has yielded promising results in some tumor types and driver pathways such that the paradigm for some cancer treatment is changing from being cancer subtype-specific to pathway-based. However, precision oncology is much more complex than simply assaying tumors for driver pathways as success is limited. Technological and scientific advances have allowed for more extensive molecular testing in addition to tumor DNA and RNA sequencing. This Special Issue of IJMS will review the successes and pitfalls of current precision oncology strategies, novel methods to analyze and incorporate large multi-dimensional datasets, pharmacogenomic considerations in personalizing therapy, the potential for drug repurposing, and the promise of artificial intelligence/informatics-based systems to aid in decision support. Research articles on these topics are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Eddy Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Combined Targeting of Mutant p53 and Jumonji Family Histone Demethylase Augments Therapeutic Efficacy of Radiation in H3K27M DIPG
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(2), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21020490 - 13 Jan 2020
Abstract
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor with a 5-year survival of <1%. Up to 80% of the DIPG tumors contain a specific K27M mutation in one of the two genes encoding histone H3 (H3K27M). Furthermore, p53 mutations found [...] Read more.
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor with a 5-year survival of <1%. Up to 80% of the DIPG tumors contain a specific K27M mutation in one of the two genes encoding histone H3 (H3K27M). Furthermore, p53 mutations found in >70–80% of H3K27M DIPG, and mutant p53 status is associated with a decreased response to radiation treatment and worse overall prognosis. Recent evidence indicates that H3K27M mutation disrupts tri-methylation at H3K27 leading to aberrant gene expression. Jumonji family histone demethylases collaborates with H3K27 mutation in DIPG by erasing H3K27 trimethylation and thus contributing to derepression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. Since the first line of treatment for pediatric DIPG is fractionated radiation, we investigated the effects of Jumonji demethylase inhibition with GSK-J4, and mutant p53 targeting/oxidative stress induction with APR-246, on radio-sensitization of human H3K27M DIPG cells. Both APR-246 and GSK-J4 displayed growth inhibitory effects as single agents in H3K27M DIPG cells. Furthermore, both of these agents elicited mild radiosensitizing effects in human DIPG cells (sensitizer enhancement ratios (SERs) of 1.12 and 1.35, respectively; p < 0.05). Strikingly, a combination of APR-246 and GSK-J4 displayed a significant enhancement of radiosensitization, with SER of 1.50 (p < 0.05) at sub-micro-molar concentrations of the drugs (0.5 μM). The molecular mechanism of the observed radiosensitization appears to involve DNA damage repair deficiency triggered by APR-246/GSK-J4, leading to the induction of apoptotic cell death. Thus, a therapeutic approach of combined targeting of mutant p53, oxidative stress induction, and Jumonji demethylase inhibition with radiation in DIPG warrants further investigation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Improved Prediction Model for Ovarian Cancer Using Urinary Biomarkers and a Novel Validation Strategy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4938; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194938 - 05 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study was designed to analyze urinary proteins associated with ovarian cancer (OC) and investigate the potential urinary biomarker panel to predict malignancy in women with pelvic masses. We analyzed 23 biomarkers in urine samples obtained from 295 patients with pelvic masses scheduled [...] Read more.
This study was designed to analyze urinary proteins associated with ovarian cancer (OC) and investigate the potential urinary biomarker panel to predict malignancy in women with pelvic masses. We analyzed 23 biomarkers in urine samples obtained from 295 patients with pelvic masses scheduled for surgery. The concentration of urinary biomarkers was quantitatively assessed by the xMAP bead-based multiplexed immunoassay. To identify the performance of each biomarker in predicting cancer over benign tumors, we used a repeated leave-group-out cross-validation strategy. The prediction models using multimarkers were evaluated to develop a urinary ovarian cancer panel. After the exclusion of 12 borderline tumors, the urinary concentration of 17 biomarkers exhibited significant differences between 158 OCs and 125 benign tumors. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and transthyretin (TTR) were the top three biomarkers representing a higher concentration in OC. HE4 demonstrated the highest performance in all samples withOC(mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) 0.822, 95% CI: 0.772–0.869), whereas TTR showed the highest efficacy in early-stage OC (AUC 0.789, 95% CI: 0.714–0.856). Overall, HE4 was the most informative biomarker, followed by creatinine, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and TTR using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression models. A multimarker panel consisting of HE4, creatinine, CEA, and TTR presented the best performance with 93.7% sensitivity (SN) at 70.6% specificity (SP) to predict OC over the benign tumor. This panel performed well regardless of disease status and demonstrated an improved performance by including menopausal status. In conclusion, the urinary biomarker panel with HE4, creatinine, CEA, and TTR provided promising efficacy in predicting OC over benign tumors in women with pelvic masses. It was also a non-invasive and easily available diagnostic tool. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Integrated Analysis of miRNA and mRNA Endorses a Twenty miRNAs Signature for Colorectal Carcinoma
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(16), 4067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20164067 - 20 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the most frequent carcinoma worldwide. CRC patients show strong prognostic differences and responses to treatment, and 20% have incurable metastatic disease at diagnosis. We considered it essential to investigate mechanisms that control cellular regulatory networks, such as the [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the most frequent carcinoma worldwide. CRC patients show strong prognostic differences and responses to treatment, and 20% have incurable metastatic disease at diagnosis. We considered it essential to investigate mechanisms that control cellular regulatory networks, such as the miRNA–mRNA interaction, known to be involved in cancer pathogenesis. We conducted a human miRNome analysis by TaqMan low density array, comparing CRC to normal colon tissue (NCT, and experimentally identified gene targets of miRNAs deregulated, by anti-correlation analysis, with the CRC whole-transcriptome profile obtained from RNASeq experiments. We identified an integrated signature of 20 deregulated miRNAs in CRC. Enrichment analyses of the gene targets controlled by these miRNAs brought to light 25 genes, members of pathways known to lead to cell growth and death (CCND1, NKD1, FZD3, MAD2L1, etc.), such as cell metabolism (ACSL6, PRPS1-2). A screening of prognosis-mediated miRNAs underlined that the overexpression of miR-224 promotes CRC metastasis, and is associated with high stage and poor survival. These findings suggest that the biology and progression of CRC depend on deregulation of multiple miRNAs that cause a complex dysfunction of cellular molecular networks. Our results have further established miRNA–mRNA interactions and defined multiple pathways involved in CRC pathogenesis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
H19-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of β3 and β4 Integrins Upon Estrogen and Hypoxia Favors Metastatic Potential in Prostate Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(16), 4012; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20164012 - 17 Aug 2019
Abstract
Estrogen and hypoxia promote an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer (PCa), driving transcription of progression-associated genes. Here, we molecularly dissect the contribution of long non-coding RNA H19 to PCa metastatic potential under combined stimuli, a topic largely uncovered. The effects of estrogen and [...] Read more.
Estrogen and hypoxia promote an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer (PCa), driving transcription of progression-associated genes. Here, we molecularly dissect the contribution of long non-coding RNA H19 to PCa metastatic potential under combined stimuli, a topic largely uncovered. The effects of estrogen and hypoxia on H19 and cell adhesion molecules’ expression were investigated in PCa cells and PCa-derived organotypic slice cultures (OSCs) by qPCR and Western blot. The molecular mechanism was addressed by chromatin immunoprecipitations, overexpression, and silencing assays. PCa cells’ metastatic potential was analyzed by in vitro cell-cell adhesion, motility test, and trans-well invasion assay. We found that combined treatment caused a significant H19 down-regulation as compared with hypoxia. In turn, H19 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell adhesion molecules, as revealed by up-regulation of both β3 and β4 integrins and E-cadherin upon H19 silencing or combined treatment. Importantly, H19 down-regulation and β integrins induction were also observed in treated OSCs. Combined treatment increased both cell motility and invasion of PCa cells. Lastly, reduction of β integrins and invasion was achieved through epigenetic modulation of H19-dependent transcription. Our study revealed that estrogen and hypoxia transcriptionally regulate, via H19, cell adhesion molecules redirecting metastatic dissemination from EMT to a β integrin-mediated invasion. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Need for Multi-Omics Biomarker Signatures in Precision Medicine
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4781; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194781 - 26 Sep 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Recent advances in omics technologies have led to unprecedented efforts characterizing the molecular changes that underlie the development and progression of a wide array of complex human diseases, including cancer. As a result, multi-omics analyses—which take advantage of these technologies in genomics, transcriptomics, [...] Read more.
Recent advances in omics technologies have led to unprecedented efforts characterizing the molecular changes that underlie the development and progression of a wide array of complex human diseases, including cancer. As a result, multi-omics analyses—which take advantage of these technologies in genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other omics areas—have been proposed and heralded as the key to advancing precision medicine in the clinic. In the field of precision oncology, genomics approaches, and, more recently, other omics analyses have helped reveal several key mechanisms in cancer development, treatment resistance, and recurrence risk, and several of these findings have been implemented in clinical oncology to help guide treatment decisions. However, truly integrated multi-omics analyses have not been applied widely, preventing further advances in precision medicine. Additional efforts are needed to develop the analytical infrastructure necessary to generate, analyze, and annotate multi-omics data effectively to inform precision medicine-based decision-making. Full article
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Open AccessReview
SUMOylation in Glioblastoma: A Novel Therapeutic Target
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(8), 1853; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20081853 - 15 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Protein SUMOylation is a dynamic post-translational modification which is involved in a diverse set of physiologic processes throughout the cell. Of note, SUMOylation also plays a role in the pathobiology of a myriad of cancers, one of which is glioblastoma (GBM). Accordingly, herein, [...] Read more.
Protein SUMOylation is a dynamic post-translational modification which is involved in a diverse set of physiologic processes throughout the cell. Of note, SUMOylation also plays a role in the pathobiology of a myriad of cancers, one of which is glioblastoma (GBM). Accordingly, herein, we review core aspects of SUMOylation as it relates to GBM and in so doing highlight putative methods/modalities capable of therapeutically engaging the pathway for treatment of this deadly neoplasm. Full article
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