ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Omics-Based Molecular Mechanisms of Cognition under Stress"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Neurobiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Seung Ho Jung
E-Mail
Guest Editor
U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, The 711th Human Performance Wing/Human Effectiveness Directorate, Airman Bioengineering Division, USA
Interests: omics-approaches to molecular mechanisms of stress and cognition; stress molecular biology; memory process; psychoneuroimmunology; neuroimmunology; bioinformatics; network science
Dr. Redei Eva
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA
Interests: omics-approaches to molecular mechanisms of stress and cognition; stress molecular biology; memory process; psychoneuroimmunology; neuroimmunology; bioinformatics; network science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic stress is now known to be associated with multiple disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, cognitive disorders. Until recently, how chronic stress affects the brain molecularly and functionally was investigated by analyzing the function of one or a small number of molecules in the brain of research animals or in the human blood. The development of scientific technologies, such as next-generation sequencing and advanced statistical and bioinformatics methods, has allowed scientists to explore and start to understand how chronic stress globally affects brain functions. In addition, these recently developed techniques and methods are greatly helping scientists decipher the omics-based molecular mechanisms of chronic stress-induced changes in cognitive functions including memory consolidation, memory retrieval, and learning processes. For this Special Issue, we encourage authors to submit original research and review articles to update our current understanding of omics-based (genomics, transcriptomics, epigenetics, proteomics, lipidomics, metabolomics) molecular mechanisms of cognitive processes under stress.

Dr. Seung Ho Jung
Dr. Redei Eva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic stress
  • post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • cognition
  • memory
  • transcriptomics
  • proteomics
  • lipodomics
  • epigenetics
  • multi-omics
  • next-generation sequencing (NGS)

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
S-Palmitoylation of Synaptic Proteins as a Novel Mechanism Underlying Sex-Dependent Differences in Neuronal Plasticity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6253; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126253 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 350
Abstract
Although sex differences in the brain are prevalent, the knowledge about mechanisms underlying sex-related effects on normal and pathological brain functioning is rather poor. It is known that female and male brains differ in size and connectivity. Moreover, those differences are related to [...] Read more.
Although sex differences in the brain are prevalent, the knowledge about mechanisms underlying sex-related effects on normal and pathological brain functioning is rather poor. It is known that female and male brains differ in size and connectivity. Moreover, those differences are related to neuronal morphology, synaptic plasticity, and molecular signaling pathways. Among different processes assuring proper synapse functions are posttranslational modifications, and among them, S-palmitoylation (S-PALM) emerges as a crucial mechanism regulating synaptic integrity. Protein S-PALM is governed by a family of palmitoyl acyltransferases, also known as DHHC proteins. Here we focused on the sex-related functional importance of DHHC7 acyltransferase because of its S-PALM action over different synaptic proteins as well as sex steroid receptors. Using the mass spectrometry-based PANIMoni method, we identified sex-dependent differences in the S-PALM of synaptic proteins potentially involved in the regulation of membrane excitability and synaptic transmission as well as in the signaling of proteins involved in the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. To determine a mechanistic source for obtained sex-dependent changes in protein S-PALM, we analyzed synaptoneurosomes isolated from DHHC7-/- (DHHC7KO) female and male mice. Our data showed sex-dependent action of DHHC7 acyltransferase. Furthermore, we revealed that different S-PALM proteins control the same biological processes in male and female synapses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics-Based Molecular Mechanisms of Cognition under Stress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop