ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2023 | Viewed by 2715

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xuewu Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Food Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Interests: food nutrition and health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Leilei Yu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
Interests: probiotics; prebiotics; dietary polysaccharide; functional food; gut microbiota and metabolites; gut health; food microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The diverse microbial species in the gastrointestinal tract (gut microbiota) are considered a ‘superorganism’ with important roles in the human physiology and metabolism. Their dysbiosis is associated with various diseases and some taxa can even serve as biomarkers or carry out the therapeutic targeting of specific diseases. The dietary intake appears to be a major regulator of the structure and function of gut microbiota. Specific dietary components, including probiotics, prebiotics, polysaccharides, polyphenols, and polypeptides, improve health status or reduce disease risk via the regulation of the gut microbiota. Although the importance of gut microbiota and diet on health and disease has attracted increasing attention, the complexity and variability of this relationship have not been fully recognized. New insights and technologies will help decipher the intricacies of microbiota–diet–health relationships.

Thus, a Special Issue entitled “Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease” is being released, welcoming all research and review articles that will improve our understanding of the molecular basis of host, diet, and gut microbiota interaction and create opportunities for breakthroughs in precise dietary interventions for personal health management.

Prof. Dr. Xuewu Zhang
Dr. Leilei Yu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • gut barrier
  • gut health
  • immune
  • inflammatory
  • dietary components
  • polysaccharide
  • probiotics

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Release of HMGB1 and Toll-like Receptors 2, 4, and 9 Signaling Are Modulated by Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and Salmonella Typhimurium in a Gnotobiotic Piglet Model of Preterm Infants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24032329 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 329
Abstract
Gnotobiotic (GN) animals with defined microbiota allow us to study host–microbiota and microbiota–microbiota interferences. Preterm germ-free (GF) piglets were mono-associated with probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB12) to ameliorate/prevent the consequences of infection with the Salmonella Typhimurium strain LT2 (LT2). Goblet cell [...] Read more.
Gnotobiotic (GN) animals with defined microbiota allow us to study host–microbiota and microbiota–microbiota interferences. Preterm germ-free (GF) piglets were mono-associated with probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB12) to ameliorate/prevent the consequences of infection with the Salmonella Typhimurium strain LT2 (LT2). Goblet cell density; expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2, 4, and 9; high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1); interleukin (IL)-6; and IL-12/23p40 were analyzed to evaluate the possible modulatory effect of BB12. BB12 prevented an LT2-induced decrease of goblet cell density in the colon. TLRs signaling modified by LT2 was not influenced by the previous association with BB12. The expression of HMGB1, IL-6, and IL12/23p40 in the jejunum, ileum, and colon and their levels in plasma were all decreased by BB12, but these changes were not statistically significant. In the colon, differences in HMGB1 distribution between the GF and LT2 piglet groups were observed. In conclusion, the mono-association of GF piglets with BB12 prior to LT2 infection partially ameliorated the inflammatory response to LT2 infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease)
Article
Postbiotics Prepared Using Lactobacillus paracasei CCFM1224 Prevent Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Modulating the Gut Microbiota and Liver Metabolism
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(21), 13522; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232113522 - 04 Nov 2022
Viewed by 835
Abstract
Postbiotics are rich in a variety of bioactive components, which may have beneficial effects in inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of postbiotics (POST) prepared from Lactobacillus paracasei on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our results showed [...] Read more.
Postbiotics are rich in a variety of bioactive components, which may have beneficial effects in inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of postbiotics (POST) prepared from Lactobacillus paracasei on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our results showed that when mice ingested a high-fat diet (HFD) and POST simultaneously, weight gain was slowed, epididymal white fat hypertrophy and insulin resistance were suppressed, serum biochemical indicators related to blood lipid metabolism were improved, and hepatic steatosis and liver inflammation decreased. Bacterial sequencing showed that POST modulated the gut microbiota in HFD mice, increasing the relative abundance of Akkermansia and reducing the relative abundance of Lachnospiraceae NK4A136 group, Ruminiclostridium and Bilophila. Spearman’s correlation analysis revealed significant correlations between lipid metabolism parameters and gut microbes. Functional prediction results showed that the regulation of gut microbiota was associated with the improvement of metabolic status. The metabolomic analysis of the liver revealed that POST-regulated liver metabolic pathways, such as glycerophospholipid and ether lipid metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, some parts of amino acid metabolism, and other metabolic pathways. In addition, POST regulated the gene expression in hepatocytes at the mRNA level, thereby regulating lipid metabolism. These findings suggest that POST plays a protective role against NAFLD and may exert its efficacy by modulating the gut microbiota and liver metabolism, and these findings may be applied to related functional foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Lactobacillus sakei MJM60958 as a Potential Probiotic Alleviated Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet by Modulating Lipid Metabolism, Inflammation, and Gut Microbiota
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(21), 13436; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232113436 - 03 Nov 2022
Viewed by 921
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease with a rapidly increasing number of cases worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus sakei MJM60958 (MJM60958) on NAFLD in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro tests, MJM60958 significantly [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease with a rapidly increasing number of cases worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus sakei MJM60958 (MJM60958) on NAFLD in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro tests, MJM60958 significantly inhibited lipid accumulation by 46.79% in HepG2 cells stimulated with oleic acid and cholesterol (OA-C). Moreover, MJM60958 showed safe and probiotic characteristics in vitro. In the animal study, MJM60958 administration in a high-fat diet-induced NAFLD mouse model significantly reduced body weight and liver weight, and controlled aspartate aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), triglyceride (TG), urea nitrogen (BUN), and uric acid (UA) levels in the blood, which are features of NAFLD. Further, treatment with MJM60958 also reduced steatosis scores in liver tissues, serum leptin and interleukin, and increased serum adiponectin content. Moreover, administration of MJM60958 resulted in a significantly decreased expression of some genes and proteins which are related to lipid accumulation, such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), and also upregulated genes and protein expression of lipid oxidation such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1A). Administration of MJM60958 increased the relative abundance of specific microbial taxa such as Verrucomicrobia, which are abundant in non-NAFLD mice, and reduced Firmicutes, which are a major group in NAFLD mice. MJM60958 affected the modulation of gut microbiota and altered the strain profile of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production in the cecum by reduced lactic acid and enhanced acetic acid production. Overall, MJM60958 showed potential as a probiotic that can prevent and treat NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Does the Composition of Gut Microbiota Affect Hypertension? Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Increasing Blood Pressure
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(2), 1377; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24021377 - 10 Jan 2023
Viewed by 324
Abstract
Arterial hypertension is a chronic disease which is very prevalent contemporarily. The aim of this review was to investigate the impact of gut microbiota on the development and potential treatment of hypertension, taking into consideration underlying molecular mechanisms. The bacteria present in the [...] Read more.
Arterial hypertension is a chronic disease which is very prevalent contemporarily. The aim of this review was to investigate the impact of gut microbiota on the development and potential treatment of hypertension, taking into consideration underlying molecular mechanisms. The bacteria present in the intestines have the ability to secrete different metabolites, which might play a significant role in the regulation of blood pressure. The most important include short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), vasoactive hormones, trimethylamine (TMA) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (PCS). Their action in regulating blood pressure is mainly based on their pro- or anti-inflammatory function. The use of specifically formulated probiotics to modify the composition of gut microbiota might be a beneficial way of supportive treatment of hypertension; however, further research on this topic is needed to choose the species of bacteria that could induce the hypotensive pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop