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Special Issue "Nutritional Modulation of Immuno-Regulatory Cytokines"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Mauro Serafini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Biosciences and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, Teramo University, Teramo, Italy
Interests: plant foods, metabolic stress, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cell-mediated immune response
Dr. Ilaria Peluso
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
CREA—Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy
Interests: nutraceuticals; inflammation; immunonutrition; pharmanutrition; food-drug interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lifestyle factors, including dietary habit, physical activity, and smoke, are modifiable determinants of the chronic inflammation involved in the pathogenesis and progression of many noncommunicable diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and metabolic syndrome.

Many studies suggest that vitamins, dietary antioxidants, and bioactive phytochemicals modulate cytokines expression and/or immune cells’ activity.

For this Special Issue, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles based on both preclinical and clinical data and comprehensive reviews aiming to understand the role of dietary bioactive ingredients in the Nutritional Modulation of Immuno-Regulatory Cytokines.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Human, animal, or in vitro studies on the effects of vitamins, nutraceuticals, natural, and industrially processed foods in relation to cytokine modulation;
  2. Human or animal studies evaluating the effects of food, functional foods, vitamins, and nutraceuticals on cytokines;
  3. Studies investigating the genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors influencing the immunomodulating effects of food, functional foods, vitamins, and nutraceuticals;

Studies investigating the molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effects of functional foods and/or nutraceuticals.

Prof. Mauro Serafini
Dr. Ilaria Peluso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Regulation of Anti-Oxidative, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Apoptotic Activity of Advanced Cooling Composition (ACC) in UVB-Irradiated Human HaCaT Keratinocytes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(18), 6527; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186527 - 07 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 813
Abstract
We recently demonstrated that advanced cooling composition (ACC) has effective ingredients that exhibit anti-inflammatory effects in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and exhibit strong antimicrobial effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Candida albicans, [...] Read more.
We recently demonstrated that advanced cooling composition (ACC) has effective ingredients that exhibit anti-inflammatory effects in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and exhibit strong antimicrobial effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Candida albicans, and Streptococcus mutans. To further investigate whether ACC has beneficial effects in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), HaCaT cells were pretreated with ACC prior to UVB irradiation. Our data showed that ACC, which is effective at 100 µg/mL, is nontoxic and has an antioxidative effect against UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HaCaT cells. In addition, ACC exerts cytoprotective effects against UVB-induced cytotoxicity in HaCaT cells by inhibiting abnormal inflammation and apoptosis through the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals, such as jun-amino-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Therefore, these results indicate that ACC is a potentially beneficial raw material that possesses antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects against UVB-induced keratinocytes and may have applications in skin health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Modulation of Immuno-Regulatory Cytokines)
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Article
Modulation of Pro-Oxidant and Pro-Inflammatory Activities of M1 Macrophages by the Natural Dipeptide Carnosine
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(3), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21030776 - 25 Jan 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1411
Abstract
Carnosine is a natural endogenous dipeptide widely distributed in mammalian tissues, existing at particularly high concentrations in the muscles and brain and possesses well-characterized antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In an in vitro model of macrophage activation, induced by lipopolysaccharide + interferon-gamma (LPS + [...] Read more.
Carnosine is a natural endogenous dipeptide widely distributed in mammalian tissues, existing at particularly high concentrations in the muscles and brain and possesses well-characterized antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In an in vitro model of macrophage activation, induced by lipopolysaccharide + interferon-gamma (LPS + IFN-γ), we here report the ability of carnosine to modulate pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory activities of macrophages, representing the primary cell type that is activated as a part of the immune response. An ample set of parameters aimed to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay), energy metabolism (HPLC), gene expressions (high-throughput real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)), protein expressions (western blot) and nitric oxide production (qRT-PCR and HPLC), was used to assess the effects of carnosine on activated macrophages challenged with a non cytotoxic LPS (100 ng/mL) + IFN-γ (600 U/mL) concentration. In our experimental model, main carnosine beneficial effects were: (1) the modulation of nitric oxide production and metabolism; (2) the amelioration of the macrophage energy state; (3) the decrease of the expressions of pro-oxidant enzymes (Nox-2, Cox-2) and of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde; (4) the restoration and/or increase of the expressions of antioxidant enzymes (Gpx1, SOD-2 and Cat); (5) the increase of the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and the down-regulation of the expressions of interleukins 1β and 6 (IL-1β and IL-6) and 6) the increase of the expressions of Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). According to these results carnosine is worth being tested in the treatment of diseases characterized by elevated levels of oxidative stress and inflammation (atherosclerosis, cancer, depression, metabolic syndrome, and neurodegenerative diseases). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Modulation of Immuno-Regulatory Cytokines)
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Review

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Review
Mediterranean Diet for the Prevention of Gestational Diabetes in the Covid-19 Era: Implications of Il-6 In Diabesity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(3), 1213; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22031213 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1781
Abstract
The aim of this review is to highlight the influence of the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Gestational Weight Gain (GWG) during the COVID-19 pandemic era and the specific role of interleukin (IL)-6 in diabesity. It is known that [...] Read more.
The aim of this review is to highlight the influence of the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Gestational Weight Gain (GWG) during the COVID-19 pandemic era and the specific role of interleukin (IL)-6 in diabesity. It is known that diabetes, high body mass index, high glycated hemoglobin and raised serum IL-6 levels are predictive of poor outcomes in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The immunopathological mechanisms of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection include rising levels of several cytokines and in particular IL-6. The latter is associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and could be useful for predicting the development of GDM. Rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals, MedDiet improves the immune system and could modulate IL-6, C reactive protein and Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB. Moreover, polyphenols could modulate microbiota composition, inhibit the NF-κB pathway, lower IL-6, and upregulate antioxidant enzymes. Finally, adhering to the MedDiet prior to and during pregnancy could have a protective effect, reducing GWG and the risk of GDM, as well as improving the immune response to viral infections such as COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Modulation of Immuno-Regulatory Cytokines)
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