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Special Issue "Comprehensive Approach to Gastrointestinal Disorders"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022 | Viewed by 1437

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Donatella Verbanac
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Hemtalogy, University of Zagreb Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Domagojeva 2, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: biochemistry; dietetics; translational research; nutrition; gut microbiota; inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); drug discovery and development; nutraceuticals; anti-infectives; anti-inflammatories
Prof. Dr. Karmela Barisic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Hemtalogy, University of Zagreb Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Domagojeva 2, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: biochemistry; molecular diagnostics; proteomics; heat shock proteins; genomics; RNA interference (RNAi); siRNA; pharmacogenomics; microbiota; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue of the MDPI journal IJMS, entitled “Comprehensive Approach to Gastrointestinal Disorders”, aims to bring additional insights into the discoveries and clinical evidence in the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with the gastrointestinal tract. Our goal is to highlight the need for a multidisciplinary, preferably translational, approach when tackling the prevention, prediction, initiation, treatment, and follow-up of the conditions associated with our digestive system and gastrointestinal diseases.

We kindly invite all of the experts working in the field of nutrition, dietetics, gut microbiota, drug discovery and development, infective and inflammatory diseases associated with the gastrointestinal tract to contribute original articles and review papers. We do hope that such a comprehensive approach will contribute to the gaining of new knowledge, which will be used in the development of innovative therapeutic approaches for the conditions associated with the misbalances in the gastrointestinal tract and the associated diseases for which an unmet medical need still exists.

Prof. Dr. Donatella Verbanac
Prof. Dr. Karmela Barisic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal disorders
  • molecular diagnostics
  • molecular mechanisms of disease
  • gut microbiota
  • inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • cancer
  • proteomic
  • transcriptomic
  • translational research
  • drug discovery
  • nutrition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
CD26 Deficiency Controls Macrophage Polarization Markers and Signal Transducers during Colitis Development and Resolution
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(10), 5506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23105506 - 14 May 2022
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Abstract
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a multifactorial condition characterized by a destructive immune response that failed to be attenuated by common regulatory mechanisms which reduce inflammation and promote mucosa healing. The inhibition of CD26, a multifunctional glycoprotein that controls the immune response via its [...] Read more.
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a multifactorial condition characterized by a destructive immune response that failed to be attenuated by common regulatory mechanisms which reduce inflammation and promote mucosa healing. The inhibition of CD26, a multifunctional glycoprotein that controls the immune response via its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP) 4 enzyme activity, was proven to have beneficial effects in various autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The polarization of macrophages into either pro-inflammatory M1 or anti-inflammatory M2 subclass is a key intersection that mediates the immune-inflammatory process in UC. Hence, we hypothesized that the deficiency of CD26 affects that process in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced model of UC. We found that mRNA expression of M2 markers arginase 1 and Fizz were increased, while the expression of M1 marker inducible NO synthase was downregulated in CD26−/− mice. Decreased STAT1 mRNA, as well as upregulated pSTAT6 and pSTAT3, additionally support the demonstrated activation of M2 macrophages under CD26 deficiency. Finally, we investigated DP8 and DP9, proteins with DP4-like activity, and found that CD26 deficiency is not a key factor for the noted upregulation of their expression in UC. In conclusion, we demonstrate that CD26 deficiency regulates macrophage polarization toward the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, which is driven by STAT6/STAT3 signaling pathways. This process is additionally enhanced by the reduction of M1 differentiation via the suppression of proinflammatory STAT1. Therefore, further studies should investigate the clinical potential of CD26 inhibitors in the treatment of UC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comprehensive Approach to Gastrointestinal Disorders)
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Article
Colonic Mucosal Immune Activation in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Disease: Association between Allergic Airway Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(1), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23010181 - 24 Dec 2021
Viewed by 822
Abstract
Recent studies on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have focused on the role of mast cells (MCs) in intestinal mucosal immunity. A link between allergic airway diseases (AADs) and IBS has been suggested because both diseases have similar pathophysiology. We aimed [...] Read more.
Recent studies on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have focused on the role of mast cells (MCs) in intestinal mucosal immunity. A link between allergic airway diseases (AADs) and IBS has been suggested because both diseases have similar pathophysiology. We aimed to investigate whether the induction of AAD in mice could lead to inflammation of the colonic mucosa, similar to IBS. We also evaluated whether this inflammatory response could be suppressed by administering a therapeutic agent. Mice were divided into three groups: control, AAD-induced, and salbutamol-treated. An AAD mouse model was established by intraperitoneal injection and nasal challenge with ovalbumin. Mice with AAD were intranasally administered salbutamol. Analyses of cytokine levels, MC count, and tryptase levels in the intestinal mucosa were performed to compare the changes in inflammatory responses among the three groups. Inflammation was observed in the intestinal mucosa of mice in the AAD group. This inflammation in AAD mice was suppressed after salbutamol treatment. Our study demonstrates that AAD induces an inflammatory response similar to that in IBS, suggesting a possible association between IBS and AADs. In patients with IBS with such allergic components, salbutamol may have the potential to alleviate the inflammatory response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comprehensive Approach to Gastrointestinal Disorders)
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