Special Issue "Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jochen Schiewe Website E-Mail
HafenCity University Hamburg, Lab for Geoinformatics and Geovisualization (g2lab), Überseeallee 16, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
Phone: +49 40 42827 5442
Interests: cartographic algorithms; geovisual analysis; uncertainty modeling and visualization; usability research; journalistic cartography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 

Overall Motivation:
In 2008, for the first time in history, more people in the world lived in cities than in rural areas. The process of urbanization is expected to continue; for example, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) expects there to be a total of 5 billion city dwellers by 2030. With that in mind, an increasing need for successful and sustainable strategic development concepts exist. In this context, the Smart City is an umbrella term for such urban planning concepts that do not consider only the infrastructures of a city, but also its intellectual, economic and social resources. Within this holistic planning viewpoint Information Communication Technologies (ICT) play a central role.  More specifically, effective and efficient provision and usage of geo-data and geo-information are of utmost importance due to the fact that numerous urban structures and processes typically inherit spatio-temporal characteristics.

Aim of this Special Issue:
This Special Issue aims to promote innovative concepts, methods and tools that help solving current and future problems in urban areas from a GI Science perspective. However, following the concept of Smart Cities, presented technical solutions should also explicitly show interdisciplinary links considering the intellectual, economic or social aspects within cities. Furthermore, contributions may go beyond typical infrastructure applications (e.g., transport, energy and water supply, waste disposal), and also pick up themes such as demography, safety, public participation, city administration, resource limitations, among others.

Topics:
In line with the specific Smart City context as outlined above, we would like to invite original research contributions on the following topics (which might be extended):

  • Use of open data (e.g., in combination with administrative data)
  • Integration of user generated content and social network data
  • Integration of sensors and systems for urban monitoring purposes
  • Management, processing and distribution of big urban data
  • Harmonization of heterogeneous and uncertain urban data
  • Enrichment of 3D city models
  • Collaborative analysis and interpretation of urban data
  • Innovative processing, analysis and visualization methods for specific urban challenges
  • Developing and testing decision urban planning tools
  • Supporting public participation processes

 

Prof. Dr. Jochen Schiewe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Editorial for the IJGI Special Issue on “Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities”
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2016, 5(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi5040039 - 23 Mar 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
In 2008, for the first time in history, more people in the world lived in cities than in rural areas.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Opening up Smart Cities: Citizen-Centric Challenges and Opportunities from GIScience
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2016, 5(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi5020016 - 17 Feb 2016
Cited by 34
Abstract
The holy grail of smart cities is an integrated, sustainable approach to improve the efficiency of the city’s operations and the quality of life of citizens. At the heart of this vision is the citizen, who is the primary beneficiary of smart city [...] Read more.
The holy grail of smart cities is an integrated, sustainable approach to improve the efficiency of the city’s operations and the quality of life of citizens. At the heart of this vision is the citizen, who is the primary beneficiary of smart city initiatives, either directly or indirectly. Despite the recent surge of research and smart cities initiatives in practice, there are still a number of challenges to overcome in realizing this vision. This position paper points out six citizen-related challenges: the engagement of citizens, the improvement of citizens’ data literacy, the pairing of quantitative and qualitative data, the need for open standards, the development of personal services, and the development of persuasive interfaces. The article furthermore advocates the use of methods and techniques from GIScience to tackle these challenges, and presents the concept of an Open City Toolkit as a way of transferring insights and solutions from GIScience to smart cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Cloud-Based Geospatial 3D Image Spaces—A Powerful Urban Model for the Smart City
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(4), 2267-2291; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi4042267 - 26 Oct 2015
Cited by 12
Abstract
In this paper, we introduce the concept and an implementation of geospatial 3D image spaces as new type of native urban models. 3D image spaces are based on collections of georeferenced RGB-D imagery. This imagery is typically acquired using multi-view stereo mobile [...] Read more.
In this paper, we introduce the concept and an implementation of geospatial 3D image spaces as new type of native urban models. 3D image spaces are based on collections of georeferenced RGB-D imagery. This imagery is typically acquired using multi-view stereo mobile mapping systems capturing dense sequences of street level imagery. Ideally, image depth information is derived using dense image matching. This delivers a very dense depth representation and ensures the spatial and temporal coherence of radiometric and depth data. This results in a high-definition WYSIWYG (“what you see is what you get”) urban model, which is intuitive to interpret and easy to interact with, and which provides powerful augmentation and 3D measuring capabilities. Furthermore, we present a scalable cloud-based framework for generating 3D image spaces of entire cities or states and a client architecture for their web-based exploitation. The model and the framework strongly support the smart city notion of efficiently connecting the urban environment and its processes with experts and citizens alike. In the paper we particularly investigate quality aspects of the urban model, namely the obtainable georeferencing accuracy and the quality of the depth map extraction. We show that our image-based georeferencing approach is capable of improving the original direct georeferencing accuracy by an order of magnitude and that the presented new multi-image matching approach is capable of providing high accuracies along with a significantly improved completeness of the depth maps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Extracting Urban Land Use from Linked Open Geospatial Data
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(4), 2109-2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi4042109 - 20 Oct 2015
Cited by 4
Abstract
The ever-increasing availability of linked open geospatial data provides an unprecedented source of geo-information to describe urban environments. This wealth of data should be turned into actionable knowledge: for example, open data could be used as a proxy or substitute for closed or [...] Read more.
The ever-increasing availability of linked open geospatial data provides an unprecedented source of geo-information to describe urban environments. This wealth of data should be turned into actionable knowledge: for example, open data could be used as a proxy or substitute for closed or expensive information. The successful employment of linked open geospatial data can pave the way for innovative solutions to smart city problems. In this paper, we illustrate a set of experiments that, starting from linked open geospatial data, execute a knowledge discovery process to predict urban semantics. More specifically, we leverage geo-information about points of interests as input in a classification model of land use at a moderate spatial resolution (250 meters) over wide urban areas in Europe. We replicate our experiments in different European cities—Milano, München, Barcelona and Brussels—to ensure the repeatability and generality of our approach, and we explain the experimental conditions, as well as the employed datasets to guarantee reproducibility. We extensively report on quantitative and qualitative evaluation results, to judge the validity, as well as the limitations of our proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Metropolises in the Twittersphere: An Informetric Investigation of Informational Flows and Networks
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(4), 1894-1912; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi4041894 - 25 Sep 2015
Cited by 3
Abstract
Information flows on social media platforms are able to show trends and user interests as well as connections between users. In this paper, we present a method how to analyze city related networks on the social media platform Twitter based on the user [...] Read more.
Information flows on social media platforms are able to show trends and user interests as well as connections between users. In this paper, we present a method how to analyze city related networks on the social media platform Twitter based on the user content. Forty million tweets have been downloaded via Twitter’s REST API (application programming interface) and Twitter’s Streaming API. The investigation focuses on two aspects: firstly, trend detection has been done to analyze 31 informational world cities, according the user activity, popularity of shared websites and topics defined by hashtags. Secondly, a hint of how connected informational cities are to each other is given by creating a clustered network based on the number of connections between different city pairs. Tokyo, New York City, London and Paris clearly lead the ranking of the most active cities if compared by the total number of tweets. The investigation shows that Twitter is very frequently used to share content from other services like Instagram or YouTube. The most popular topics in tweets reveal great differences between the cities. In conclusion, the investigation shows that social media services like Twitter also can be a mirror of the society they are used in and bring to light information flows of connected cities in a global network. The presented method can be applied in further research to analyze information flows regarding specific topics and/or geographical locations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Housing Abandonment and Demolition: Exploring the Use of Micro-Level and Multi-Year Models
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(3), 1184-1200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi4031184 - 13 Jul 2015
Cited by 11
Abstract
Policies focusing on enforcing property code violations and the improvement of vacant properties are argued to be more efficacious than demolition policies to fight urban blight. This study applies parcel level data to a multi-year hybrid modeling structure. A fine-grained analysis is conducted [...] Read more.
Policies focusing on enforcing property code violations and the improvement of vacant properties are argued to be more efficacious than demolition policies to fight urban blight. This study applies parcel level data to a multi-year hybrid modeling structure. A fine-grained analysis is conducted on the dynamic patterns of abandonment and demolition for a unique period of four years before and after the City of Buffalo’s stepped-up demolition efforts. Results showed that proximity to vacant and abandoned properties, sustained over the years, had the greatest impact on the possibility of a property being abandoned. The second greatest positive impact on property abandonment was small lot front size. Results also showed that neighborhood vacancy density had the greatest negative impact on surrounding housing sales prices over the years. There was no significant impact of demolition on housing sales prices. These findings suggested that the City should aim to have more incentive programs that are tailored to control the number of vacant properties, rather than focusing primarily on demolition-oriented programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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Open AccessCommunication
Exploiting Spatial Abstraction in Predictive Analytics of Vehicle Traffic
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(2), 591-606; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi4020591 - 15 Apr 2015
Cited by 9
Abstract
By applying visual analytics techniques to vehicle traffic data, we found a way to visualize and study the relationships between the traffic intensity and movement speed on links of a spatially abstracted transportation network. We observed that the traffic intensities and speeds in [...] Read more.
By applying visual analytics techniques to vehicle traffic data, we found a way to visualize and study the relationships between the traffic intensity and movement speed on links of a spatially abstracted transportation network. We observed that the traffic intensities and speeds in an abstracted network are interrelated in the same way as they are in a detailed street network at the level of street segments. We developed interactive visual interfaces that support representing these interdependencies by mathematical models. To test the possibility of utilizing them for performing traffic simulations on the basis of abstracted transportation networks, we devised a prototypical simulation algorithm employing these dependency models. The algorithm is embedded in an interactive visual environment for defining traffic scenarios, running simulations, and exploring their results. Our research demonstrates a principal possibility of performing traffic simulations on the basis of spatially abstracted transportation networks using dependency models derived from real traffic data. This possibility needs to be comprehensively investigated and tested in collaboration with transportation domain specialists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Fostering Innovative Solutions for Smart Cities)
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