Special Issue "Recent Advances in GIS and Remote Sensing for Sustainable Agriculture"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tao Cheng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Engineering and Technology Center for Information Agriculture (NETCIA), Nanjing Agricultural University, 1 Weigang, Nanjing 210095, China
Fax: +86 25 8439 6672
Interests: quantitative remote sensing; UAV; crop mapping; precision farming; crop growth monitoring; spectral analysis; imaging spectroscopy; crop disease detection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Eugene Genong Yu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
Interests: GIS; decision support systems; sensor Web; semantic Web; image understanding; Internet GIS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable agriculture is vital to economic development, food security, and environmental quality all over the world. Farming in a sustainable way is crucial, not only for the current generation of the worldwide population, but also for future generations. Applications of GIS and remote sensing technologies have been proved as efficient approaches in supporting sustainable agriculture research and operation with data, models, and analytics. Advancements in remote sensing facilitate systems of observations across scales, times, and locations. GIS connects and aligns data with locations from different sources, including remote sensing, in situ observations, surveys, and historical archives. The results lead to improved crop management practices, optimized use of pesticide and fertilizers, timely assessment of cultivated land productivity, and effective monitoring of environmental quality in agricultural production regions. This Special Issue focuses on recent advances in various applications of GIS and remote sensing in the development of sustainable agriculture. The topics include:

  • Cropland/rangeland mapping
  • Crop growth monitoring
  • Soil condition monitoring
  • Classification and change detection of cultivated land
  • Modeling and monitoring of crop pesticide and disease damage
  • Crop productivity prediction
  • Integration of GIS and remote sensing in agriculture
  • Crop production and environmental quality
  • Site-specific optimization of non-renewable resources

Tao Cheng
Eugene Yu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Farm Level Assessment of Irrigation Performance for Dairy Pastures in the Goulburn-Murray District of Australia by Combining Satellite-Based Measures with Weather and Water Delivery Information
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2017, 6(8), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi6080239 - 06 Aug 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Pasture performance of 924 dairy farms in a major irrigation district of Australia was investigated for their water use and water productivity during the 2015-2016 summer which was the peak irrigation period. Using satellite images from Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2, estimates of crop coefficient [...] Read more.
Pasture performance of 924 dairy farms in a major irrigation district of Australia was investigated for their water use and water productivity during the 2015-2016 summer which was the peak irrigation period. Using satellite images from Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2, estimates of crop coefficient (Kc) were determined on the basis of a strong linear relationship between crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and vegetation index (NDVI) of pasture in the region. Utilizing estimates of Kc and crop water requirement (CWR), NDVI-dependent estimates of Irrigation Water Requirement (IWR) were derived based on the soil water balance model. In combination with daily weather information and seasonal irrigation water supply records, IWR was the key component in the understanding of current irrigation status at farm level, and deriving two irrigation performance indicators: (1) Relative Irrigation Water Use (RIWU) and (2) Total Irrigation Water Productivity (TIWP). A slightly higher proportion of farm irrigators were found to be either matching the irrigation requirement or under-watering (RIWU ≤ 1.0). According to TIWP, a few dairy farms (3%) were found to be in the category of high yield potential with excess water use, and very few (1%) in the category of limited water supply to pastures of high yield potential. A relatively high number of farms were found to be in the category where excess water was supplied to pastures of low-medium yield potential (27%), and farms where water supply compromised pastures with a sub-maximal vegetation status (15%). The results of this study will assist in objectively identifying where significant improvement in efficient irrigation water use can be achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in GIS and Remote Sensing for Sustainable Agriculture)
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Open AccessArticle
Conceptual Architecture and Service-Oriented Implementation of a Regional Geoportal for Rice Monitoring
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2017, 6(7), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi6070191 - 23 Jun 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Agricultural monitoring has greatly benefited from the increased availability of a wide variety of remote-sensed satellite imagery, ground-sensed data (e.g., weather station networks) and crop models, delivering a wealth of actionable information to stakeholders to better streamline and improve agricultural practices. Nevertheless, as [...] Read more.
Agricultural monitoring has greatly benefited from the increased availability of a wide variety of remote-sensed satellite imagery, ground-sensed data (e.g., weather station networks) and crop models, delivering a wealth of actionable information to stakeholders to better streamline and improve agricultural practices. Nevertheless, as the degree of sophistication of agriculture monitoring systems increases, significant challenges arise due to the handling and integration of multi-scale data sources to present information to decision-makers in a way which is useful, understandable and user friendly. To address these issues, in this article we present the conceptual architecture and service-oriented implementation of a regional geoportal, specifically focused on rice crop monitoring in order to perform unified monitoring with a supporting system at regional scale. It is capable of storing, processing, managing, serving and visualizing monitoring and generated data products with different granularity and originating from different data sources. Specifically, we focus on data sources and data flow, and their importance for and in relation to different stakeholders. In the context of an EU-funded research project, we present an implementation of the regional geoportal for rice monitoring, which is currently in use in Europe’s three largest rice-producing countries, Italy, Greece and Spain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in GIS and Remote Sensing for Sustainable Agriculture)
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