Special Issue "Applying Traffic Psychology and Human Factors to Understand and Prevent Road Trauma: Now and Tomorrow"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q), Queensland University of Technology, 2 George St, Brisbane City QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: human factors; behavioral adaption; human-computer Interaction; systems psychology; safety
Dr. Yuting Zhang
Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, Shaanxi, China
Interests: collision avoidance; driver behaviour; physiological measurement
Dr. Mark Johann King
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q), Queensland University of Technology, 2 George St, Brisbane City QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: traffic psychology; risky behaviours; injury prevention; low and middle-income countries; vulnerable road users
Dr. Xiaomeng Li
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q), Queensland University of Technology, 2 George St, Brisbane City QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: intelligent transport systems (ITS); driving simulators; driving performance; traffic engineering; traffic safety
Dr. Tyron Louw
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, Woodhouse, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
Interests: vehicle automation; psychophysiology; driver behavior; human-machine interface; technology acceptance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Road trauma is a major cause of both fatalities and disability worldwide. Specifically, road crashes involving motorists and vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists result in the most severe consequences for human health. Emerging technologies such as vehicle automation are aimed at reducing the criticality of near-misses/crashes and improving the sustainability of the transport system. However, estimates suggest that benefits from automated vehicles are only likely to become widespread once numerous challenges around policy, public perception, technology, infrastructure, and human–system integration have been addressed. Therefore, to facilitate a transition to a safer mobility ecosystem, it is important to investigate the determinants of road users’ behaviours as well as their limitations and capabilities.

This Special Issue provides a platform for research using traffic psychology and human factor frameworks, theories, and methodologies, both in the traditional transport context and a future automated transport system. Traffic psychology is the study of the behaviour of road users and the psychological processes underlying that behaviour. The human factor includes the application of scientific knowledge of human strengths and limitations to the design of systems in the work environment to ensure safe and effective performance. Road safety benefits from the application of theories, philosophies, frameworks, and methodologies originating from these two symbiotic disciplines.

Researchers are invited to submit manuscripts regarding any aspect of road user behaviour (i.e., pedestrians, cyclists, drivers, and users of other mobility devices) that influences the safety of all road users in the transportation system. We also expect contributions from researchers developing or evaluating advanced transport systems capable of increasing the safety of all road users. Papers addressing the context of intelligent transport systems and automation are particularly welcome. Qualitative, quantitative, and review articles are encouraged.

Dr. Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios
Dr. Mark Johann King
Dr. Xiaomeng Li
Dr. Tyron Louw
Dr. Yuting Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Driver behavior
  • Vulnerable road users
  • Risky behaviour
  • Human–machine interaction (HMI)
  • Intelligent transport systems (ITS)
  • Vehicle automation
  • Risk perception
  • Road safety
  • Attitudes
  • Road education

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Impact of Age-Related Vision Changes on Driving
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207416 - 12 Oct 2020
Abstract
Aging leads to impaired visual function, which can affect driving—a very visually demanding task—and has a direct impact on an individual’s quality of life if their license is withdrawn. This study examined the associations between age-related vision changes and simulated driving performance. To [...] Read more.
Aging leads to impaired visual function, which can affect driving—a very visually demanding task—and has a direct impact on an individual’s quality of life if their license is withdrawn. This study examined the associations between age-related vision changes and simulated driving performance. To this end, we attempted to determine the most significant visual parameters in terms of evaluating elderly drivers’ eyesight. Twenty-one younger drivers (aged 25–40) were compared to 21 older drivers (aged 56–71). Study participants were assessed for visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, halos, and intraocular straylight, which causes veiling luminance on the retina and degrades vision. Driving performance was evaluated using a driving simulator. The relationships between simulated driving performance and the visual parameters tested were examined with correlation analyses and linear regression models. Older drivers presented impairment in most visual parameters (p < 0.05), with straylight being the most significantly affected (we also measured the associated effect size). Older drivers performed significantly worse (p < 0.05) in the simulator test, with a markedly lower performance in lane stability. The results of the multiple linear regression model evidenced that intraocular straylight is the best visual parameter for predicting simulated driving performance (R2 = 0.513). Older drivers have shown significantly poorer results in several aspects of visual function, as well as difficulties in driving simulator performance. Our results suggest that the non-standardized straylight evaluation could be significant in driver assessments, especially at the onset of age-related vision changes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Naturalistic Driving Study in Brazil: An Analysis of Mobile Phone Use Behavior while Driving
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6412; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176412 - 03 Sep 2020
Abstract
Mobile phone use (MPU) while driving is an important road safety challenge worldwide. Naturalistic driving studies (NDS) emerged as one of the most sophisticated methodologies to investigate driver behavior; however, NDS have not been implemented in low- or middle-income countries. The aim of [...] Read more.
Mobile phone use (MPU) while driving is an important road safety challenge worldwide. Naturalistic driving studies (NDS) emerged as one of the most sophisticated methodologies to investigate driver behavior; however, NDS have not been implemented in low- or middle-income countries. The aim of this research is to investigate MPU while driving and compare the results to those reported in international studies. An analysis of 61.32 h and 1350 km driven in Curitiba (Brazil) showed that MPU lasted for an average of 28.51 s (n = 627) and occurred in 58.71% of trips (n = 201) with an average frequency of 8.37 interactions per hour (n = 201). The proportion of the trip time using a mobile phone was 7.03% (n = 201), and the average instantaneous speed was 12.77 km/h (n = 627) while using the phone. Generally, drivers spent less time on more complex interactions and selected a lower speed when using the phone. MPU was observed more during short duration than longer trips. Drivers in this study engaged in a larger number of MPU compared to drivers from Netherlands and the United States; and the percentage of trip time with MPU was between North American and European values. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Are Your Eyes “on the Road”? Findings from the 2019 National Study on Vision and Driving Safety in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093195 - 04 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background: Vision is an undisputable contributor to the explanation of many human-factor related traffic crashes happening every day. The Inland Transport Committee (ITC), the United Nations regulatory platform, included on 1st April 2020 special action on the vision of road users inside [...] Read more.
Background: Vision is an undisputable contributor to the explanation of many human-factor related traffic crashes happening every day. The Inland Transport Committee (ITC), the United Nations regulatory platform, included on 1st April 2020 special action on the vision of road users inside the ITC Recommendations for Enhancing Road Safety Systems. The results of this wide-scale study on drivers’ vision health conducted in Spain perfectly illustrates the need of global action and its potential impact on the public health figures and the burden of potentially preventable traffic causalities. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess three key visual health issues (i.e., visual acuity, visual field campimetry and glare recovery) among Spanish drivers, in order to formulate implications and possible guidelines to enhance road safety. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined the visual health of a representative sample of 3249 drivers (70% females and 30% males) with a mean age of 41 (SD = 13) years, gathered from all the 17 autonomous communities of Spain. Results: The tests performed allowed to determine that 15% of Spanish drivers have a poor photopic vision, while 38% of them present an inadequate mesopic vision. Further, 23% of drivers have deficiencies in peripheric visual field campimetry, and the average time for full-vision recovery after a 10-s glare was 27 s. Sex, age and driver type (professional vs. non-professional) differences were found for the study variables. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the idea that certain demographic-based population groups of drivers present several unaddressed deficiencies and impairments in visual health. Overall an estimated 29.5% of Spanish drivers present visual issues, that need to be attended in order to enhance the prevention of driving crashes and the road safety of all road users. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop