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Open AccessArticle

Risk Factors for Duty-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Police Officers in the Mt. Ontake Eruption Disaster-Support Task Force

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto-shi, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
2
Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto-shi, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
3
Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University, 5322 Endo, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3134; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093134
Received: 23 March 2020 / Revised: 25 April 2020 / Accepted: 26 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Prevention, and Resilience among First Responders)
Mount Ontake in Nagano Prefecture, Japan erupted on 27 September 2014. Many police officers were called in for duty as a disaster-support task force. We investigated the association between the peritraumatic situation and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in these police officers. In January 2015, a health survey (OHS) on disaster stress related to the Mt. Ontake eruption disaster support work was distributed to all of the police officers and staff involved in the disaster support. We analyzed the 213 participants who had PTSD symptoms following the eruption and no missing OHS data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to clarify the relationship between the participants’ symptom severity and their peritraumatic situation (i.e., stressors and daily support prior to the eruption, disaster-support work duties, and postdisaster stress relief). The symptom severity was associated with ‘more than seven cumulative days at work’ (odds ratio [OR] = 2.47, 1.21–5.06), ‘selecting drinking and/or smoking as stress relief after disaster-support work’ (OR = 2.35, 1.09–5.04), and ‘female’ (OR = 3.58, 1.19–10.77). As disaster-support work, ‘supporting the victims’ families’ (OR = 1.99, 0.95–4.21) tended to be associated with symptom severity. The number of days of disaster-support work, stress-relief behavior, and gender were associated with the severity of PTSD symptoms. View Full-Text
Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); PTSD symptoms among police officers; peritraumatic situation; volcanic disaster posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); PTSD symptoms among police officers; peritraumatic situation; volcanic disaster
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kamijo, T.; Tsukahara, T.; Shimazu, A.; Nomiyama, T. Risk Factors for Duty-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Police Officers in the Mt. Ontake Eruption Disaster-Support Task Force. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3134. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093134

AMA Style

Kamijo T, Tsukahara T, Shimazu A, Nomiyama T. Risk Factors for Duty-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Police Officers in the Mt. Ontake Eruption Disaster-Support Task Force. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(9):3134. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093134

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kamijo, Tomoko; Tsukahara, Teruomi; Shimazu, Akihito; Nomiyama, Tetsuo. 2020. "Risk Factors for Duty-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Police Officers in the Mt. Ontake Eruption Disaster-Support Task Force" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 9: 3134. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093134

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