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Special Issue "Return to Work and Occupational Health Services"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 28383

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Evangelos C. Alexopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Occupational Health Department, Metopolitan General Hospital, 155 62 Athens, Greece
Interests: occupational health; occupational medicine; exposure assessment; public health; environmental epidemiology; environmental health; employee well-being; preventive medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When aging, an impairment, or an illness affect the ability of a person to maintain, enter, or return to work (RTW), a complex process is activated in the personal, family, employer, welfare and insurance system, and state levels in which the disincentives and barriers (unmet needs, ineffective policies and strategies, inadequate evidence) prevail. Commonly, the employer is reluctant to allocate resources to accommodate work, when in most cases it is not clear what has to be done. On the other hand, the employer has an ethical and legal duty to control work-related risks to prevent work-related illness and accident. Specifically, the efforts to control work-related stress would influence the sustainable RTW behavior of workers, entering and maintaining a job by disabled persons, and in general employee well-being and engagement.

Occupational health services (OHS) could facilitate and optimize employability by monitoring and evaluating the recovery process; determining the relevant to work residual abilities; managing expectations; advising work arrangements and adaptations; and informing and raising the awareness of co-workers and managers. However, OHS are underutilized and their potential impact remains largely understudied. In this issue, we wish to shed light on the factors that influence OHS effectiveness, considering individual-tailored strategies, disease-related disability, the job context (demands, flexibility, organizational and psychosocial characteristics), unionization, the welfare system, other economic and social incentives or disincentives, and the availability of OHS. The future and retrospective utilization of studies using the demand-control-support model, effort–reward imbalance, job demands–resources, and other models of occupational stress on RTW and employability are highly welcomed. Of specific interest are the processes and work modification options on “subjectively disabled” symptoms in a nonflexible job context (e.g., factors that influence the RTW of nurses with musculoskeletal disorders).

Dr. Evangelos C. Alexopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • disability
  • employment
  • return to work
  • sick leave
  • work reintegration
  • work inclusion
  • disability insurance
  • social security
  • health capital
  • labor force participation
  • occupational physician
  • demand–control–support model
  • job demands–resources model

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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Article
Factors Affecting the Reinstatement of the Japanese Dental Hygienist: A Japanese Dental Hygienist Survey Conducted in 2019
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042049 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1451
Abstract
There is a shortage of dental hygienists for dental clinics in Japan. An ideal solution would be for dormant dental hygienists to re-enter the workforce. In this study, we identified the obstacles preventing these dental hygienists from re-entering the workforce. The Japan Dental [...] Read more.
There is a shortage of dental hygienists for dental clinics in Japan. An ideal solution would be for dormant dental hygienists to re-enter the workforce. In this study, we identified the obstacles preventing these dental hygienists from re-entering the workforce. The Japan Dental Hygienists’ Association surveyed all 16,113 members about their working conditions. Among the 101 items in the questionnaire, 11 items specifically targeted the reasons why dental hygienists leave their jobs. Among 8780 responses (54.5%), 1063 were from members who had resigned from jobs as dental hygienists. Three hundred and fifty-five (34.4%) answered “Yes” to the question “I would like to return to work if conditions are satisfactory.” The most frequent cause for leaving a job was” Childbirth and child-rearing” (16.9%). “Working status/working hours” (15.7%) was the main obstacle to re-entry. Furthermore, dental hygienists with intentions to re-enter decided to leave their jobs most frequently because of “Childbirth and child-rearing” and “Working status/working hours.” Improvement of the social support system for dental hygienists is required to ensure a sufficient supply of dental health services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Article
Influence of Psychosocial and Sociodemographic Variables on Sickness Leave and Disability in Patients with Work-Related Neck and Low Back Pain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5966; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165966 - 17 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1305
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the association between psychosocial factors in patients with work-related neck or low back pain (n = 129), in order to study sickness leave, its duration, the disability reported, and to analyze the relationship of [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to describe the association between psychosocial factors in patients with work-related neck or low back pain (n = 129), in order to study sickness leave, its duration, the disability reported, and to analyze the relationship of these factors with different sociodemographic variables. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data on kinesiophobia, catastrophizing, disability, and pain were gathered. Sociodemographic variables analyzed included sex, age, occupational, and educational level. Other data such as location of pain, sick leave status and duration of sickness absence were also collected. Educational level (p = 0.001), occupational level (p < 0.001), and kinesiophobia (p < 0.001) were found to be associated with sickness leave; kinesiophobia (b = 1.47, p = 0.002, r = 0.35) and catastrophizing (b = 0.72, p = 0.012, r = 0.28) were associated with the duration of sickness leave. Educational level (p =0.021), kinesiophobia (b = 1.69, p < 0.000, r = 0.505), catastrophizing (b = 0.76, p < 0.000, r = 0.372), and intensity of pain (b = 4.36, p < 0.000, r = 0.334) were associated with the degree of disability. In the context of occupational insurance providers, educational and occupational factors, as well as kinesiophobia and catastrophizing, may have an influence on sickness leave, its duration and the degree of disability reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Communication
Trends in the Cumulative Incidence of Vocational Rehabilitation Indicators in Brazil, 2007–2016
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3952; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113952 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1621
Abstract
Vocational rehabilitation (VR) aims at improving work ability to facilitate workers’ return to work. VR is provided in Brazil by the public social security system. The aim of the present study was to analyze trends in VR indicators for Brazil from 2007 to [...] Read more.
Vocational rehabilitation (VR) aims at improving work ability to facilitate workers’ return to work. VR is provided in Brazil by the public social security system. The aim of the present study was to analyze trends in VR indicators for Brazil from 2007 to 2016. Based on open-access, secondary aggregate data, we calculated the cumulative incidence of VR indicators. We fitted Prais-Winsten generalized linear regression models to estimate trends and calculated annual percent variation with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The mean cumulative incidence of referrals to VR services was 37.16/1000 temporary disability benefits granted and exhibited a decreasing trend of −6.92% (95% CI: −8.38; −5.43). The mean cumulative incidence of admissions to VR services was 57.34/100 referrals and exhibited an increasing trend of 3.31% (95% CI: 1.13; 5.53). The mean cumulative incidence of rehabilitation was 57.43/100 admissions and remained stable along the analyzed period, −2.84 (95% CI: −5.87; 0.29). Our findings evidence a reduction in the number of workers referred for VR, an increase of admissions, and stability in the cumulative incidence of rehabilitated workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Work Ability and Quality of Life in Patients with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3310; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093310 - 09 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1514
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate level of work ability and quality of life (QOL) as well as the relationship between them among patients suffering from work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study design with continuous sampling and a questionnaire were used [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate level of work ability and quality of life (QOL) as well as the relationship between them among patients suffering from work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study design with continuous sampling and a questionnaire were used to obtain the research data. Controlling for personal characteristics, pain, psychological distress, and social support, multiple linear regressions were adopted to explore the relationship between work ability and overall QOL. Further analyses were also made to clarify the relationships between work ability and each domain of QOL. In total, 165 patients with WMSDs were recruited. Compared with general workers, the participants reported a lower level of work ability and overall QOL. Work ability was significantly associated with overall QOL when covariates were controlled. Among the four domains of QOL, work ability was significantly associated with both the physical and psychological domains. The conclusion was that work ability is a definite factor of QOL for patients with WMSDs; the essence of work ability may be beyond economic function or social support. Strategies to help workers with WMSDs enhance their work ability to fit their new or temporary jobs would be beneficial to their QOL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Long-Term Employment Outcomes among Female Cancer Survivors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2751; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082751 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
Advances in early detection and treatment have led to a growing population of female cancer survivors, many of whom are of working age. We examined the relationship between cancer and long-term (>5 years) employment outcomes in a nationally representative sample of working-age women [...] Read more.
Advances in early detection and treatment have led to a growing population of female cancer survivors, many of whom are of working age. We examined the relationship between cancer and long-term (>5 years) employment outcomes in a nationally representative sample of working-age women in the United States. Data from nine waves of the Health and Retirement Study were used to examine employment status and weekly hours worked among cancer survivors (n = 483) and women without cancer (n = 6605). We used random slope regression models to estimate the impact of cancer and occupation type on employment outcomes. There was no difference in employment status between cancer survivors and women without cancer at baseline; however, during follow-up, cancer survivors were more likely to be employed than women without cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.58). Among 6–10-year survivors, professional workers were less likely (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.21–0.74) to be employed than manual workers. Among >10-year survivors, professional workers averaged fewer weekly hours worked (−2.4 h, 95% CI: −4.4–−0.47) than manual workers. The impact of cancer on long-term employment outcomes may differ by occupation type. Identifying the occupation-specific mechanisms associated with the return to work will be critical to developing targeted strategies to promote employment in the growing female cancer survivor population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Is Repetitive Workload a Risk Factor for Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Surgical Device Mechanics? A Cross-Sectional Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1383; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041383 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1479
Abstract
To assess the prevalence of upper extremity work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among surgical device mechanics compared to a control group, a total of 70 employees were included and assigned to three occupational groups (grinders, packers, and control). Personal factors, work exposure, manual skill, [...] Read more.
To assess the prevalence of upper extremity work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among surgical device mechanics compared to a control group, a total of 70 employees were included and assigned to three occupational groups (grinders, packers, and control). Personal factors, work exposure, manual skill, and complaints were assessed by two self-administered questionnaires and an industry test. WMSDs were diagnosed in a standardised clinical examination. The two-one-sided t-tests (TOST) procedure was used to test the clinical equivalence of the respective grinding and packaging groups vs. the control group in terms of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score. Thirty-nine study participants (56%) experienced at least one WMSD at the elbow, forearm, and/or wrist, mainly with signs of epicondylitis and nerve entrapment at the medial elbow. The risk of grinders developing upper extremity WMSD was about 2.5-times higher and packers had an 8.6-fold higher risk of a clinically relevant DASH > 29 compared to the control group. However, these differences were not statistically significant. The groups were also proven to be clinically equivalent in terms of DASH score. Surgical device mechanics do not seem to have worse DASH values or be at higher risk of upper limb WMSDs compared to a control group. This is the first study to analyse and compare different workplaces in this industry that are also common in other industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Article
Temporary Disability Pension, RTW-Intentions, and RTW-Behavior: Expectations and Experiences of Disability Pensioners over 17 Months
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010238 - 28 Dec 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1661
Abstract
Purpose: Individuals receiving a temporary disability pension (TDP) should get the opportunity to return to work (RTW). The current study aims to determine the factors contributing to RTW. Methods: 453 individuals on TDP were interviewed at three measurement points (T1, T2 [...] Read more.
Purpose: Individuals receiving a temporary disability pension (TDP) should get the opportunity to return to work (RTW). The current study aims to determine the factors contributing to RTW. Methods: 453 individuals on TDP were interviewed at three measurement points (T1, T2 = T1 + approximately 7 months, T3 = T1 + approximately 17 months). Socio-demographics, psychological predictors, and current work status (maintained TDP, permanent disability pension, old-age pension, employed, or receipt of other benefits) were assessed. Results: Throughout the duration of the study, only four of the former temporary disability pensioners returned to work, and an additional seven made themselves available to the labor market. These were individuals who were younger, in TDP for a shorter period of time, and reported a higher RTW-intention. Higher RTW-intention was cross-sectionally associated with younger age, shorter TDP duration, and more positive outcome expectancies. Additionally, study participants who expected that medical rehabilitation would help them RTW were more motivated to RTW. An increase in RTW-intention over 17 months was related to younger age and better health. Conclusion: Personal factors such as self-efficacy and job-related variables appear less important for RTW than age and subjective health status. The observed RTW rates call for early support and tailored medical rehabilitation interventions that help individuals prevent functional limitations, overcome disability, and facilitate RTW. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Article
Sex Differences in Factors Associated with General Life Satisfaction among Occupationally Injured Workers in Korea: A Panel Analysis of the 2013–2017 Panel Study of Worker’s Compensation Insurance
by , , , and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4397; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224397 - 11 Nov 2019
Viewed by 1206
Abstract
The majority of previous occupational studies focused on factors affecting life satisfaction among occupationally injured workers have been based on a cross-sectional design, not a sex-aggregated model. This study aimed to identify sex differences in factors related to life satisfaction among workers who [...] Read more.
The majority of previous occupational studies focused on factors affecting life satisfaction among occupationally injured workers have been based on a cross-sectional design, not a sex-aggregated model. This study aimed to identify sex differences in factors related to life satisfaction among workers who experienced work-related injuries using nationally representative panel data from South Korea. Data from the first to fifth (2013–2017) waves of the Panel Study of Worker’s Compensation Insurance were analyzed. Of 1514 respondents, those who participated in all five survey waves were included in the final study population. To assess the factors associated with general life satisfaction of the occupationally injured workers, a panel data analysis was conducted using generalized estimating equations. The impacts of education level, return to work, self-rated health, task performance, self-esteem, and self-efficacy were significant in both sexes. On the other hand, the influence of age, marital status, personal labor income, and National Basic Livelihood Act recipient status significantly varied by sex. There were sex differences in factors related to general life satisfaction among occupationally injured workers, highlighting the need for sex-specific intervention programs. Employers, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders need to pay attention to vulnerable groups and investigate the most appropriate financial support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Indirect Costs of Rheumatoid Arthritis Depending on Type of Treatment—A Systematic Literature Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2966; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162966 - 17 Aug 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1807
Abstract
The economic burden of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on society is high. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the cornerstone of therapy. Biological DMARDs are reported to prevent disability and improve quality of life, thus reducing indirect RA costs. We systematically reviewed studies on the [...] Read more.
The economic burden of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on society is high. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the cornerstone of therapy. Biological DMARDs are reported to prevent disability and improve quality of life, thus reducing indirect RA costs. We systematically reviewed studies on the relationship between RA and indirect costs comparing biological treatment with standard care. Studies, economic analyses, and systematic reviews published until October 2018 through a MEDLINE search were included. A total of 153 non-duplicate citations were identified, 92 (60%) were excluded as they did not meet pre-defined inclusion criteria. Sixty-one articles were included, 17 of them (28%) were reviews. After full-text review, 28 articles were included, 11 of them were reviews. Costs associated with productivity loss are substantial; in several cases, they may represent over 50% of the total. The most common method of estimation is the Human Capital method. However, certain heterogeneity is observed in the method of estimating, as well as in the resultant figures. Data from included trials indicate that biological therapy is associated with improved labor force participation despite an illness, in which the natural course of disease is defined by progressive work impairment. Use of biological DMARDs may lead to significant indirect cost benefits to society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Article
Changes in Income after an Industrial Accident According to Industry and Return-to-Work Status
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2603; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142603 - 22 Jul 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1548
Abstract
Objective: To investigate changes in the incomes of workers, particularly those in the construction sector, who experienced industrial accidents according to their status of return to work. Methods: We used data from the fifth Panel Study of Workers’ Compensation Insurance. A repeated measures [...] Read more.
Objective: To investigate changes in the incomes of workers, particularly those in the construction sector, who experienced industrial accidents according to their status of return to work. Methods: We used data from the fifth Panel Study of Workers’ Compensation Insurance. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare annual differential incomes before and after the industrial accident, and a linear mixed model was used to investigate the changes in income from before to after the industrial accident according to the industry and return-to-work status. Results: A comparison of the industrial categories revealed that construction industry workers exhibited the greatest incomes before the accident and the greatest decrease in income after the industrial accident. Regression analysis for assessing changes in income after the industrial accident showed that a comparison by industry revealed a significantly greater reduction in income in the construction than service industry. A comparison by work status revealed significantly greater decreases in income in the reemployment and non-return to work groups than among those who returned to their original work. Conclusions: The economic statuses of the victims of industrial accidents decreased relative to the pre-accident statuses in all industries. The ability to return to original work is important for preserving the accident victim’s economic status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Employees’ Perceptions of CSR, Work Engagement, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Mediating Effects of Organizational Justice
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1731; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101731 - 16 May 2019
Cited by 52 | Viewed by 5375
Abstract
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the individual level has emerged as an important field of research. However, a more comprehensive understanding of how CSR affects employee work engagement and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is still lacking. Based on social exchange theory, we examine [...] Read more.
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the individual level has emerged as an important field of research. However, a more comprehensive understanding of how CSR affects employee work engagement and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is still lacking. Based on social exchange theory, we examine the effects of employees’ perceptions of CSR on OCB and work engagement as well as the mediating mechanism of distributive and procedural justice, based on data collected from 350 employees working in the banking sector of Pakistan. Our study suggests that employees’ perceptions of CSR positively predict OCB and work engagement, and that work engagement is positively related to OCB. Both distributive and procedural justice positively mediate the effects of employees’ perceptions of CSR on OCB and work engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Article
Injury Occurrence and Return to Dance in Professional Ballet: Prospective Analysis of Specific Correlates
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 765; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050765 - 03 Mar 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2439
Abstract
Professional ballet is a highly challenging art, but studies have rarely examined factors associated with injury status in ballet professionals. This study aimed to prospectively examine gender-specific correlates of injury occurrence and time-off from injury in professional ballet dancers over a one-year period. [...] Read more.
Professional ballet is a highly challenging art, but studies have rarely examined factors associated with injury status in ballet professionals. This study aimed to prospectively examine gender-specific correlates of injury occurrence and time-off from injury in professional ballet dancers over a one-year period. The participants were 99 professional ballet dancers (41 males and 58 females). Variables included: (i) predictors: sociodemographic data (age, educational status), ballet-related factors (i.e., experience in ballet, ballet status), cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and consumption of illicit drugs; and (ii) outcomes: injury occurrence and time-off from injury. Participants were questioned on predictors at the beginning of the season, while data on outcomes were collected continuously once per month over the study period. Dancers reported total of 196 injuries (1.9 injuries (95% CI: 1.6–2.3) per dancer in average), corresponding to 1.4 injuries per 1000 dance-hours (95% CI: 1.1–1.7). In females, cigarette smoking was a predictor of injury occurrence in females (OR: 4.33, 95% CI: 1.05–17.85). Alcohol drinking was a risk factor for absence from dance in females (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01–4.21) and males (OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.05–3.41). Less experienced dancers were more absent from dance as a result of injury than their more experienced peers (Mann-Whitney Z: 2.02, p < 0.04). Ballet dancers and their managers should be aware of the findings of this study to make informed decisions on their behavior (dancers) or to initiate specific programs aimed at the prevention of substance use and misuse in this profession (managers). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
Article
Adherence to Treatment in Stroke Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020196 - 11 Jan 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2652
Abstract
Background: Compliance with medication in patients who have suffered stroke is usually not-optimal. This study aims to measure the level of compliance with the treatment and to identify socio-demographic, clinical, and subjective factors related to the long-term compliance of stroke patients with [...] Read more.
Background: Compliance with medication in patients who have suffered stroke is usually not-optimal. This study aims to measure the level of compliance with the treatment and to identify socio-demographic, clinical, and subjective factors related to the long-term compliance of stroke patients with their treatment. Methods: 140 patients (66.4% males) suffered an ischemic stroke at least six months old, participated in the survey. Compliance was measured using the Medication Adherence Report Scale and the quality of life by the Stroke Specific Quality of Life questionnaire. Furthermore, the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire on perceptions about the disease were assessed. The doctor–patient relationship was assessed by the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation questionnaire and the family support was assessed by the FSS scale. Univariate and multivariate analysis was employed to identify the significant factors affecting compliance in these stroke patients. Results: In 68.6% of patients the compliance was classified as optimal, in 25.7% as partial and as poor in 5.7%; the last two categories were treated as sub-optimal compliance in multivariate analysis. The high compliance was related to patient’s mental state (OR:3.94 95% CI: 1.84–4.46), the perception medication necessity (OR:1.26 95% CI: 1.01–1.56), and the doctor–patient communication (OR:1.76 95% CI: 1.15–2.70). Men showed a lower compliance than women, as well as increased concerns about taking medication (OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69–0.99). Paradoxically, the work /productivity related quality of life was inversely associated with compliance (OR (95% CI): 0.44 (0.23 to 0.82)). Conclusions: The perception of medication necessity and the doctor–patient communication are manageable factors associated with compliance in treating patients who have suffered stroke. In addition, rehabilitation and return to work programs should consider these factors when providing support to those persons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)

Review

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Review
Recent Status and Methodological Quality of Return-to-Work Rates of Cancer Patients Reported in Japan: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1461; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081461 - 24 Apr 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1765
Abstract
Cancer patients’ return-to-work rates in Japan and their methodological quality have been little reported. We conducted a systematic review to explore the recent return-to-work rates and to assess the methodological quality of the existing literature. We selected 13 papers (2 in English and [...] Read more.
Cancer patients’ return-to-work rates in Japan and their methodological quality have been little reported. We conducted a systematic review to explore the recent return-to-work rates and to assess the methodological quality of the existing literature. We selected 13 papers (2 in English and 11 in Japanese) published between 2005 and 2017. The return-to-work rates ranged from 53.8% to 95.2%. Of the selected papers, 12 papers employed a cross-sectional design, possessing high risk of selection bias due to participant selection. A total of 8 papers did not fully report the subjects’ sex, age, employment status at cancer diagnosis, cancer site, stage, and treatment, suggesting high risk of selection bias due to confounding variables. High or unclear risk of attrition bias due to incomplete outcome data was detected in 12 papers in which data on return to work were not collected from all participants. High risk of reporting bias due to selective outcome reporting was pointed out in 6 studies in which the subjects’ employment status at return to work or the duration between cancer diagnosis and assessment of return to work was unclear. Future studies must reduce the risk of selection, attrition, and reporting biases for specifying accurate return-to-work rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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Other

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Erratum
Erratum: Ekenga, C.; et al. Long-Term Employment Outcomes among Female Cancer Survivors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2751
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9169; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249169 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 620
Abstract
Due to an error during production, Section 3 [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Return to Work and Occupational Health Services)
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