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Special Issue "Suicide Prevention Strategies"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Evangelos C. Alexopoulos

Metopolitan General Hospital, Occupational Health Dpt., 264 Mesogion Avenue, 155 62 Holargos, Athens, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: occupational health; occupational medicine; exposure assessment; public health; environmental epidemiology; environmental health; employee well-being; preventive medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

At the opposite end of a meaningful life and happiness, suicide has a profound societal impact. Suicidal ideation encompasses an interplay of personal resources with physical, mental, and social challenges and thus suicide prevention requires a multifactorial and integrated approach. Socioeconomic factors such as unemployment, financial difficulties, discrimination, bullying, lack of social support, and work-related stressors are associated with suicidal behavior. Higher suicide rates have been monitored in specific occupational groups such as farmers, healthcare professionals, as well as emergency and protective service occupations (e.g., police, firefighters, armed forces, security officers). In this context, job resources could be crucial in suicide prevention by the early identification of predisposing physical and mental ill-health and vulnerability at the personal level and by crafting a supportive work environment. Occupational and primary health services, where available, could affect work stressors and coping resources but efforts/initiatives should be positioned within community, education, business, agriculture, armed forces and other society sectors. Media and politics also hold important roles.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, entitled “Suicide Prevention Strategies”, offers an opportunity to publish high-quality multi-disciplinary research. We welcome research related to suicide and suicide attempt with high intent epidemiology (rates, trends, patterns among countries, gender, age, and occupational group), research on indicators and surveillance initiatives (to account for the constellation of risk factors and the heterogeneity of data quality), and papers related to prevention strategies and interventions.

Dr. Evangelos C. Alexopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • suicide
  • attempted suicide
  • suicide statistics
  • suicide risk assessment
  • psychosocial risks
  • job stress
  • working conditions
  • suicide prevention programs
  • suicide prevention intervention

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Suicide Mortality Patterns in Greek Work Force before and during the Economic Crisis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030469
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
Background: The global recession of 2007 has attracted research attention in regard to a possible increase of deaths by suicide among employed populations. The aim of the current study was to update the first Greek study on suicide mortality among broad occupational [...] Read more.
Background: The global recession of 2007 has attracted research attention in regard to a possible increase of deaths by suicide among employed populations. The aim of the current study was to update the first Greek study on suicide mortality among broad occupational groups during 2000–2009, with the last available data covering the first period of economic crisis and recession in Greece. Methods: Data on suicide deaths for the age groups of 15–39, 40–49 and 50–59, between 2000–2013 were retrieved from the national statististical authority of Greece, ELSTAT. The coding of suicide used was X60–X84 (intentional self-harm), based on the 10th International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Comparative mortality ratio (CMR) and exact 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: Males and females in the occupational group of clerks exhibited high and increased CMRs during the crisis period (2010–2013). Although high ratios for males in elementary, agricultural and fishery and armed forces occupational groups were monitored during the whole period, a decrease was evident during the crisis period. Increased trends in CMRs during the crisis were monitored for both males and females in the broad occupational group of members including managers, executives and directors. In addition, females especially in the 50–59 age group showed increased ratios and trends in several occupational groups during the crisis, especially in technologists and associate professionals, plant and machine operators and assemblers, professionals, and craft and related trade workers. Conclusions: Austerity-related stress should alert key stakeholders and provide mental health and suicide prevention interventions for employed occupations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide Prevention Strategies)
Open AccessArticle A Look at Culture and Stigma of Suicide: Textual Analysis of Community Theatre Performances
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030352
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 19 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
PDF Full-text (320 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Stigma against suicidal ideation and help-seeking is a significant barrier to prevention. Little detail is provided on what types of stigma interfere with help-seeking, how stigma is expressed, and how to reduce it. Five groups of two ethnically diverse community theatre programs were [...] Read more.
Stigma against suicidal ideation and help-seeking is a significant barrier to prevention. Little detail is provided on what types of stigma interfere with help-seeking, how stigma is expressed, and how to reduce it. Five groups of two ethnically diverse community theatre programs were formed to analyze differences in Eastern Montana Caucasian and Native American adolescents and young adults’ experiences with stigma about mental illness and mental health treatment that affect help-seeking for suicidal thoughts and experiences. Over a ten-week period, a grassroots theatre project was used to recruit members from the same population as the audience to write and perform a play on suicide and depression (n = 33; 10 males, 23 females; 12 Native American, 21 Caucasian, ages 14–24). Using textual analysis, the community- and campus-based performance scripts were coded for themes related to stigma. Both ethnic groups reported that stigma is a barrier to expressing emotional vulnerability, seeking help, and acknowledging mental illness. We found that Caucasians’ experiences were more individually oriented and Native Americans’ experiences were more collectively oriented. Understanding the cultural bases of experiences with stigma related to mental health treatment for suicide is necessary to create educational programs to reduce stigma for diverse groups of adolescents and young adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide Prevention Strategies)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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