Special Issue "Promoting Health: Physical Activity and Well-Being in Children and Adolescents"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Damián Iglesias Gallego
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physical Education and Exercise Lab. Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, Avd. de la Universidad S/N, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: physical education; physical activity; applied psychology; wellbeing; mental health
Dr. Benito León del Barco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology. Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, Avd. de la Universidad S/N, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: psychological development; education; physical activity; wellbeing; mental health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a growing interest in research into the determinants of health-related quality of life. Studies highlighting the importance of regular physical activity as a healthy practice and numerous investigations have shown that the practice of physical activity contributes positively to psychosocial wellbeing in the population. Physical education within the school context is presented as a suitable environment to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles, and it is agreed that physical activity carried out at an early age helps to establish healthy living habits that can last a lifetime.

In this Special Issue we are inviting researchers from different academic disciplines (physical education, psychology, sociology, medicine, etc.) to address the study of physical activity as a central variable in achieving a healthier population from a multiple or bio-psychosocial point of view. We are looking for studies that analyze the subject within the school context through physical education lessons, in free time outside school, or indeed studies with adult and elderly populations. The proposal is open to cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention studies that apply quantitative, qualitative or mixed methodologies. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses and proposals for new measuring instruments are also welcomed.

Dr. Damián Iglesias-Gallego
Dr. Benito León del Barco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health promotion
  • Physical activity
  • Physical education
  • Sport
  • Wellbeing
  • Applied psychology
  • Medicine
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Adults
  • Elderly

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
No More Bricks in the Wall: Adopting Healthy Lifestyles through Physical Education Classes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4860; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234860 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Despite the multiple benefits associated with practicing physical activity regularly, less than 20% of the population do it on a daily basis. Physical education classes could contribute, during childhood and adolescence, to consolidating adherence to healthy lifestyle habits. The present study involved 606 [...] Read more.
Despite the multiple benefits associated with practicing physical activity regularly, less than 20% of the population do it on a daily basis. Physical education classes could contribute, during childhood and adolescence, to consolidating adherence to healthy lifestyle habits. The present study involved 606 secondary school students between the ages of 13 and 19. We analysed the relationships between the perception of psychological control and support for autonomy, the satisfaction and frustration of psychological needs, mind-wandering and mindfulness, positive and negative emotions, motivation towards physical education classes, physical activity and the intention to be physically active—all through a structural equation model, which presented acceptable goodness-of-fit indices. The results showed that students who feel more autonomous see that their psychological needs are met and feel emotionally positive; this will result in the development of autonomous motivation towards physical education classes and physical activity that, in turn, could lead to a greater intention to be physically active. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Active Commute in Relation to Cognition and Academic Achievement in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Future Recommendations
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5103; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245103 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
Active commuting to school (ACS) is an important source of physical activity among children. Recent research has focused on ACS and its benefits on cognition and academic achievement (AA), factors important for success in school. This review aims to synthesize literature on the [...] Read more.
Active commuting to school (ACS) is an important source of physical activity among children. Recent research has focused on ACS and its benefits on cognition and academic achievement (AA), factors important for success in school. This review aims to synthesize literature on the relationship between ACS and cognition or AA among children and adolescents. Peer-reviewed articles in PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library assessing ACS with cognition and/or AA among children, until February 2019, were selected. Twelve studies across nine countries (age range 4–18.5 years) were included. One study used accelerometers, whereas all others used self-report measures of ACS. A wide range of objective assessments of cognitive functioning and AA domains were used. Five among eight studies, and four among six found a positive relationship between ACS and cognitive or AA measure, respectively. Four studies found dose–response relationships, and some studies found sex differences. The quantitative analysis found that ACS was not significantly associated with mathematics score (odds ratio = 1.18; CI = 0.40, 3.48). Findings are discussed in terms of methodological issues, potential confounders, and the strength of the evidence. Future studies should conduct longitudinal studies and use objective measures of ACS to understand this relationship further. Full article
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