Special Issue "Physical Fitness and Sport Sciences: Training and Injury Prevention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jaime Fernandez-Fernandez
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Guest Editor
The Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, Universidad de León, Leon 24004, Spain
Interests: racket sports; maturation and performance; injury prevention; neuromuscular training
Prof. Dr. Urs Granacher
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Division of Training and Movement Sciences, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany
Interests: postural control, muscle strength, resistance training, youth
Dr. Manuel Moya-Ramon
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sports Science, Miguel Hernández University of Elche, 03202 Elche, Spain
Interests: monitoring training loads; heart rate variability; youth athletes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main purpose of the training process is not only to achieve a high level of success in the sport, but also to induce physical adaptations that enhance sport-specific skills and health. In this regard, the manipulation of training and exercise parameters (e.g., volume, intensity, density) are key factors to maximize training adaptations and physical performance. In order to achieve high levels of success, coaches and strength and conditioning coaches should correctly monitor these loads, which should be carefully planned for the optimization of athletic performance and health. Moreover, since the athlete and/or practitioner is a unique individual, it should be relevant to focus on individual responses rather than only on the group’s results, since this approach could result in missing important individual responses.  

Thus, the aim of this Special issue entitled “Physical fitness and Sport Sciences: Training and Injury Prevention” is to provide in-depth knowledge in the form of original work, review articles, and meta-analyses on the effects and effectiveness to different training and exercise methods, considered together with the importance of considering an individualized approach in training and exercise. A special emphasis will be placed on athletic performance, gender, and injury prevention in youth athletes during the different stages of maturation.

Prof. Dr. Jaime Fernandez-Fernandez
Prof. Dr. Urs Granacher
Dr. Manuel Moya-Ramon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity and health
  • physical fitness
  • training and injury prevention
  • youth athletes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Seasonal Changes in Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness and the Relationships with Sporting Success in Young Sub-Elite Judo Athletes: An Exploratory Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7169; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197169 - 30 Sep 2020
Abstract
This exploratory study aimed to monitor long-term seasonal developments in measures of anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness in young judo athletes, and to compute associations between these measures and sporting success. Forty-four young judoka (20 females, 24 males) volunteered to participate. Tests [...] Read more.
This exploratory study aimed to monitor long-term seasonal developments in measures of anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness in young judo athletes, and to compute associations between these measures and sporting success. Forty-four young judoka (20 females, 24 males) volunteered to participate. Tests for the assessment of anthropometry (e.g., body height/mass), body-composition (e.g., lean body mass), muscle strength (isometric handgrip strength), vertical jumping (e.g., countermovement-jump (CMJ) height), and dynamic balance (Y-balance test) were conducted at the beginning and end of a 10-month training season. Additionally, sporting success at the end of the season was recorded for each athlete. Analyses revealed significant time × sex interaction effects for lean-body-mass, isometric handgrip strength, and CMJ height (0.7 ≤ d ≤ 1.6). Post-hoc analyses showed larger gains for all measures in young males (1.9 ≤ d ≤6.0) compared with females (d = 2.4) across the season. Additionally, significant increases in body height and mass as well as Y-balance test scores were found from pre-to-post-test (1.2 ≤ d ≤4.3), irrespective of sex. Further, non-significant small-to-moderate-sized correlations were identified between changes in anthropometry/body composition/physical fitness and sporting success (p > 0.05; −0.34 ≤ ρ ≤ 0.32). Regression analysis confirmed that no model significantly predicted sporting success. Ten months of judo training and/or growth/maturation contributed to significant changes in anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness, particularly in young male judo athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Fitness and Sport Sciences: Training and Injury Prevention)
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Open AccessArticle
Strength Conditioning Program to Prevent Adductor Muscle Strains in Football: Does it Really Help Professional Football Players?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6408; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176408 - 02 Sep 2020
Abstract
Coaches at the professional level are often concerned about negative side effects from testing and intensive resistance training periods, and they are not willing to base their training prescriptions on data obtained from semiprofessional or amateur football players. Consequently, the purpose of this [...] Read more.
Coaches at the professional level are often concerned about negative side effects from testing and intensive resistance training periods, and they are not willing to base their training prescriptions on data obtained from semiprofessional or amateur football players. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to analyze the reliability and effectiveness of two adductor injury active prevention programs using the adductor/abductor ratio and deficit between legs, on the basis of adduction–abduction power output during the exercises proposed, in professional football players. Forty-eight professional football players undertook complementary strength training for the adductor and abductor muscles in their dominant and non-dominant legs, once or twice a week throughout the playing season. The volume of the session was determined by the adductor/abductor ratio and the deficit between legs in the last session training measured. The number and severity of muscle injuries per 1000 h of exposure were recorded. Both prevention programs showed a very low rate of adductor injury (0.27 and 0.07 injuries/1000 h) with mild-to-moderate severity, maintaining a balance in percentage asymmetry between dominant and non-dominant legs for adductor (10.37%) and in the adductor/abductor ratio (0.92) in top professional football players throughout the season. The strength conditioning program proposed can help to prevent adductor muscle injuries in top professional football players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Fitness and Sport Sciences: Training and Injury Prevention)
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