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Open AccessArticle

Strength Conditioning Program to Prevent Adductor Muscle Strains in Football: Does it Really Help Professional Football Players?

1
Department of Sports and Informatics, Sport Faculty, University of Pablo de Olavide of Sevilla, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
2
Physical Trainer Coach of Valencia C.F, 46010 Valencia, Spain
3
Readapter of Valencia C.F., 46010 Valencia, Spain
4
Physical Trainer Coach of Villarreal C.F., 12540 Vila-Real, Spain
5
Head of Medical Staff of Valencia C.F., 46010 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6408; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176408
Received: 15 July 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 30 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Fitness and Sport Sciences: Training and Injury Prevention)
Coaches at the professional level are often concerned about negative side effects from testing and intensive resistance training periods, and they are not willing to base their training prescriptions on data obtained from semiprofessional or amateur football players. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to analyze the reliability and effectiveness of two adductor injury active prevention programs using the adductor/abductor ratio and deficit between legs, on the basis of adduction–abduction power output during the exercises proposed, in professional football players. Forty-eight professional football players undertook complementary strength training for the adductor and abductor muscles in their dominant and non-dominant legs, once or twice a week throughout the playing season. The volume of the session was determined by the adductor/abductor ratio and the deficit between legs in the last session training measured. The number and severity of muscle injuries per 1000 h of exposure were recorded. Both prevention programs showed a very low rate of adductor injury (0.27 and 0.07 injuries/1000 h) with mild-to-moderate severity, maintaining a balance in percentage asymmetry between dominant and non-dominant legs for adductor (10.37%) and in the adductor/abductor ratio (0.92) in top professional football players throughout the season. The strength conditioning program proposed can help to prevent adductor muscle injuries in top professional football players. View Full-Text
Keywords: prevention; soccer (football); rotatory inertial device; adductor injury; unilateral deficits; ratio adductor-abductor prevention; soccer (football); rotatory inertial device; adductor injury; unilateral deficits; ratio adductor-abductor
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Núñez, J.F.; Fernandez, I.; Torres, A.; García, S.; Manzanet, P.; Casani, P.; Suarez-Arrones, L. Strength Conditioning Program to Prevent Adductor Muscle Strains in Football: Does it Really Help Professional Football Players? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6408.

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