Special Issue "Physical and Mental Health in the Workplace"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kyung-Eun (Anna) Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center of Health Services Research Brandenburg, Brandenburg Medical School Theodor Fontane, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany
Interests: work and health; diversity in medicine and inclusion of persons with disabilities; integrative medicine / integrative oncology; quantitative and qualitative methods in empirical research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Work plays a pivotal role in society. It is not only the primary source of income for most people but is also an essential factor in shaping quality of life and social identity. Work disability is a vital public health problem in Western industrialised countries and an enormous economic burden for society (Vilsteren et al., 2015). Mental health and musculoskeletal disorders are the leading causes for sick leave, with long-term sick leave connected to occupational, social, and economic deprivation (Henderson 2005). Many workplaces cannot meet the specific needs of their employees, and may even cause and/or aggravate significant mental and physical health problems.

This Special Issue focuses on the current state of knowledge on the links between work and physical and mental health. We welcome contributions of new (quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods) original research papers, reviews, and case series. Papers dealing with new theoretical approaches for occupational and/or rehabilitation management are also appreciated. Other accepted manuscript types may include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries.

IJERPH is an interdisciplinary journal. This Special Issue therefore welcomes manuscripts from different disciplines, including health services research, rehabilitation science, implementation science, psychology, epidemiology, sociology.

Dr. Kyung-Eun (Anna) Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • work conditions
  • rehabilitation
  • prevention
  • resilience
  • wellbeing
  • stress
  • sick leave
  • return to work
  • psychosocial
  • coordination programmes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Importance of an Emotional Expression Guide to Prevent Work-Related Health Problems in Emotional Laborers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6710; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136710 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 247
Abstract
Background: As the service industry develops, the proportion of emotional laborers is gradually increasing, and their occupational health problems are gradually becoming serious social problems. Researchers must consider various factors, from the personal to the organizational levels, to prevent health problems from arising [...] Read more.
Background: As the service industry develops, the proportion of emotional laborers is gradually increasing, and their occupational health problems are gradually becoming serious social problems. Researchers must consider various factors, from the personal to the organizational levels, to prevent health problems from arising in the workplace. Many intervention studies have investigated the health and wellbeing of workers, but mainly at the individual level, even though an organization’s interest and efforts are essential for addressing work-related health problems. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to verify the importance of organizations’ interests to protect emotional laborers from work-related health problems. Methods: We used data obtained through the 4th Korean Working Condition Survey of 2014. The study cohort comprised 5857 survey participants over the age of 18 years. Employers, self-employed persons and professional soldiers were excluded. Logistic regression was employed to identify associations between an emotional expression guide and work-related health problems using SPSS 22.0 statistical software. Results: In the absence of an emotional expression guide, the risk of work-related physical and psychological health problems was increased. Even after adjusting for confounding variables, the risks were statistically maintained, particularly headache (odds ratio (OR) 1.798; 95% confidence interval 95% CI: 1.288–2.508), lower limb muscular pain (OR: 1.627; 95% CI: 1.130–2.342), general fatigue (OR: 1.582; 95% CI: 1.077–2.326) and depressive symptom (OR: 6.149; 95% CI: 1.198–31.563). Conclusion: This study showed that organizations’ interests and efforts to prevent workers from being harmed by the effects of emotional labor are important in the prevention of psychosocial and physical health problems; therefore, a national interest in supporting emotional laborers and in introducing policies to support these workers should be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical and Mental Health in the Workplace)
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Article
Precarious Employment and Increased Incidence of Musculoskeletal Pain among Wage Workers in Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126299 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 364
Abstract
The number of precarious workers is increasing globally, and precarious employment is becoming a public concern in terms of workers’ health. However, sufficient research on precarious employment and its impact on musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is lacking. This study aimed to investigate the relationship [...] Read more.
The number of precarious workers is increasing globally, and precarious employment is becoming a public concern in terms of workers’ health. However, sufficient research on precarious employment and its impact on musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is lacking. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between precarious employment and the risk of MSP among Korean wage workers. After merging the data from the 4th and 5th Korean Working Conditions Surveys, 59,644 wage workers were analyzed. The control group comprised full-time permanent workers, and precarious employment was defined as workers involved in temporary or daily employment, or part-time workers. The outcome variable was the summed number of MSP in three anatomical sites (back, neck and upper limb, lower limb). Zero-inflated negative binomial analyses were selected to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between precarious employment and MSP. In adjusted models with age, sex, educational level, income level, weekly working hours, and occupation, precarious employment was significantly associated with an increased risk of both MSP (OR 1.66 95% CI 1.56–1.77) and work-related MSP (OR 1.18 95% CI 1.11–1.25). Given the job insecurity and health inequity associated with precarious employment, special attention on precarious workers’ health is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical and Mental Health in the Workplace)
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