ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Oral Health among the Older Population

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 10799

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Academic Centre of Geriatric Dentistry, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 141 52 Huddinge, Sweden
Interests: geriatric dentistry; oral health related quality of life; qualitative research; nursing

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 141 52 Huddinge, Sweden
Interests: geriatric dentistry; oral health and systemic diseases; epidemiology; nutrition; dementia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this Special Issue, entitled “Oral health among the older population”. This is a collection of important high-quality papers (original research articles or comprehensive review papers) published in Open Access form. This Special Issue aims to review and document the cardinal issues and state-of-the-art in oral health among the older population—a profoundly impacted and considerably changed scenario today. Selected high-quality contributions that cover different aspects of this scenario will make this issue both interesting and important reading material for several disciplines involved in the health-related circumstances of the older population.

Papers can comprise personal research work, quantitative and qualitative methods, or reviews of recent and actual reports of other researchers. Papers targeting more recently developed fields or research directions are especially welcome. Contributions to this Special Issue will be accepted by invitation only in order to benefit both authors and readers; we would also like to grant a discount for submissions based on evaluation.

Contributors are encouraged to send a draft title and a short abstract to our Editorial Office ([email protected]) for evaluation before submission. Please note that selected full papers will still be subjected to a thorough and rigorous peer-review.

We look forward to receiving your excellent work.

Dr. Inger Wårdh
Dr. Nivetha Gavriilidou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health of the older population
  • oral health and oral care of the older population
  • geriatric dentistry
  • global perspectives of the oral status of the older generation
  • economic and society perspectives
  • nursing care for the older population
  • functional limitations in the older population
  • dementia
  • nutrition in the older population
  • ethical aspects in oral care and treatment of the older population

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

10 pages, 512 KiB  
Article
Predictive Factors Associated with Future Decline in Swallowing Function among Japanese Older People Aged ≥ 75 Years
by Komei Iwai, Tetsuji Azuma, Takatoshi Yonenaga, Yasuyuki Sasai, Yoshinari Komatsu, Koichiro Tabata, Taketsugu Nomura, Iwane Sugiura, Yujo Inagawa, Yusuke Matsumoto, Seiji Nakashima, Yoshikazu Abe and Takaaki Tomofuji
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(6), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21060674 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 321
Abstract
Predictive factors associated with a decline in swallowing function after 2 years were examined in 3409 Japanese older people aged ≥ 75 years who had undergone a dental checkup in Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Participants with normal swallowing function in a baseline survey in [...] Read more.
Predictive factors associated with a decline in swallowing function after 2 years were examined in 3409 Japanese older people aged ≥ 75 years who had undergone a dental checkup in Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Participants with normal swallowing function in a baseline survey in April 2018 were followed for 2 years. Swallowing function was assessed using a repetitive saliva swallowing test. In our study, 429 participants (13%) who were swallowing less than three times in 30 s based on a repetitive saliva swallowing test after 2 years were diagnosed as those with decline in swallowing function. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed the decline in swallowing function after 2 years was associated with the male gender (odds ratio [ORs]: 0.772; 95% confidence interval [CIs]: 0.615–0.969), age ≥ 81 years (presence; ORs: 1.523; 95% CIs: 1.224–1.895), support/care-need certification (presence; ORs: 1.815; 95% CIs: 1.361–2.394), periodontal pocket depth (PPD) ≥ 4 mm (presence; ORs: 1.469; 95% CIs: 1.163–1.856), difficulty in biting hard food (yes; ORs: 1.439; 95% CIs: 1.145–1.808), choking on tea and water (yes; ORs: 2.543; 95% CIs: 2.025–3.193), and dry mouth (yes; ORs: 1.316; 95% CIs: 1.052–1.646) at baseline. Therefore, the dental checkup items associated with a decline in swallowing function after 2 years were a PPD ≥ 4 mm, difficulty in biting hard food, choking on tea and water, and dry mouth. PPD status and confirming to the self-administered questionnaire about biting, choking, and dry mouth may be useful in predicting future decline in swallowing function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health among the Older Population)
7 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
A Narrative of Oral Care in Palliative Patients
by Siri Flagestad Kvalheim and Gunhild Vesterhus Strand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6306; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106306 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2846
Abstract
Painful oral conditions represent a significant problem for most patients with a serious disease and palliative care needs. The main causes of such conditions may be associated with the underlying disease and its treatment, but primarily with adverse side effects of drugs. Oral [...] Read more.
Painful oral conditions represent a significant problem for most patients with a serious disease and palliative care needs. The main causes of such conditions may be associated with the underlying disease and its treatment, but primarily with adverse side effects of drugs. Oral conditions can lead to worsening of the illness and reduced quality of life. The objective of this narrative is to present an overview of oral care problems of this group, including present clinical practice. The evidence base for procedures and efficient products is weak. There is therefore an obvious need for research within this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health among the Older Population)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1086 KiB  
Article
The Relation between Masticatory Function and Nutrition in Older Individuals, Dependent on Supportive Care for Daily Living
by Per Elgestad Stjernfeldt, Gerd Faxén Irving, Inger Wårdh, Robert Lundqvist and Angelika Lantto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5801; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105801 - 10 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2088
Abstract
Introduction: Associations between masticatory function and nutritional status have been suggested. Masticatory function can be divided into two subdomains, the objective capacity of an individual to mix solid food and the individual’s subjectively assessed ability to masticate solid food. Aim: The aims of [...] Read more.
Introduction: Associations between masticatory function and nutritional status have been suggested. Masticatory function can be divided into two subdomains, the objective capacity of an individual to mix solid food and the individual’s subjectively assessed ability to masticate solid food. Aim: The aims of this study were to assess the relationship between these subdomains and nutritional variables in older, care-dependent individuals. Materials and methods: From a group of 355 individuals with care dependency and functional limitations, individuals aged 60 and older were selected. By home visits, the subjects underwent an oral examination and answered chewing related questions. Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment. A total of 196 individuals met the age requirement of 60 years or older. Of these, 86 subjects were able to answer the questions. Results: We could not find any concluding significant associations between the subdomains of masticatory function or the nutritional variables. Conclusions: The absence of associations could be explained by the lack of standardized and validated methods to assess masticatory function and they possibly reflect varying underlying constructs. Self-reported questionnaires seem less useful among older and care-dependent individuals, while an objective clinical measurement will be needed when evaluating masticatory function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health among the Older Population)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1219 KiB  
Article
Oral Assessment and Preventive Actions within the Swedish Quality Register Senior Alert: Impact on Frail Older Adults’ Oral Health in a Longitudinal Perspective
by Lisa Bellander, Pia Andersson, Helle Wijk and Catharina Hägglin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(24), 13075; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182413075 - 11 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2547
Abstract
Poor oral health is common among older people in nursing homes. To identify and prevent oral health problems among the residents, ROAG-J (Revised Oral Assessment Guide–Jönköping), a risk-assessment instrument, is used by nursing staff routinely, and the outcome is registered in the web-based [...] Read more.
Poor oral health is common among older people in nursing homes. To identify and prevent oral health problems among the residents, ROAG-J (Revised Oral Assessment Guide–Jönköping), a risk-assessment instrument, is used by nursing staff routinely, and the outcome is registered in the web-based Swedish quality register Senior Alert. This study aims to investigate the preventive actions registered when oral health problems are identified and the effect of these actions longitudinally. ROAG-J data registered at nursing homes in Sweden during 2011–2016 were obtained from the Senior Alert database. Out of 52,740 residents (≥65 years), 41% had oral health problems, of whom 62% had preventive actions registered. The most common action was “Assistance with cleaning teeth”. Longitudinally, during the five-year observation period, a slight increase in oral health problems assessed with ROAG-J was found. Registered preventive actions, however, led to significant improvement in the subsequent assessment for the ROAG items lips, tongue, and dentures. Standardised risk assessments like ROAG-J provide an opportunity to detect problems early and establish preventive actions. The study, however, indicates a further need for structured education and a continuous follow-up in ROAG-J. Moreover, increased collaboration between nursing and dental care to improve oral health for older residents at nursing homes is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health among the Older Population)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1540 KiB  
Article
Daily Tasks and Willingness to Work of Dental Hygienists in Nursing Facilities Using Japanese Dental Hygienists’ Survey 2019
by Yuki Ohara, Yoshiaki Nomura, Yuko Yamamoto, Ayako Okada, Noriyasu Hosoya, Nobuhiro Hanada, Hirohiko Hirano and Noriko Takei
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063152 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 2051
Abstract
Oral health care by dental hygienists contributes to the maintenance of nutritional and general health for older people in nursing facilities. This study aimed to investigate daily tasks and willingness to work among dental hygienists working in nursing facilities in Japan. In 2019, [...] Read more.
Oral health care by dental hygienists contributes to the maintenance of nutritional and general health for older people in nursing facilities. This study aimed to investigate daily tasks and willingness to work among dental hygienists working in nursing facilities in Japan. In 2019, using a self-administered questionnaire, a postal cross-sectional survey was conducted among members of the Japanese Dental Hygienists’ Association. Questionnaires were distributed to all 16,722 Association members (responses, n = 8932; return rate, 53.4%). We analysed data from 368 dental hygienists currently working in nursing facilities. Item response theory and correspondence analyses were performed. In total, >90% of dental hygienists undertook oral examinations and provided oral hygiene instructions to residents and facility staff. In contrast, the implementation rate of tasks related to interprofessional collaboration was relatively low (approximately 50%), and 72.6% of dental hygienists indicated that they wanted to continue working in nursing facilities. Their willingness to work was closely associated with work involving interprofessional collaboration. Our study findings showed that dental hygienists’ work content in nursing facilities was diverse, but that there was variation in implemented tasks. Willingness to continue working in nursing facilities was associated with interprofessional collaboration among dental hygienists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health among the Older Population)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop