Special Issue "Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Catherine Daus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, School of Education, Health and Human Behavior, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, USA
Interests: emotions in workplace; emotional intelligence; emotional labor; discrete emotions (pride in particular); humor in workplace; stress and burnout; work-life balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue to bring together interdisciplinary perspectives on emotions and occupational health across a wide range of health, life, and social sciences, in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.
Emotions in organizational life have become increasingly acknowledged as being critical, both academically and practically, particularly in the last two decades. Researchers and practitioners have sought to extend our understanding and predictability of work life beyond a “rational, cognitive” framework. Theories and constructs, such as affective events theory, positive and negative affectivity (PA/NA), emotional labour, and emotional intelligence, have provided foundational structures upon which to build theory and practice regarding emotions in the workplace. In addition, discrete emotions in the workplace, such as anger, pride, and joy, provide unique information above and beyond broad affect and emotion. In this Issue, we seek to provide a series of empirical and theoretical papers that specifically showcase the role emotions and affect-related constructs play in occupational health.
This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to understanding the complexity of emotions in the workplace, and occupational health. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Catherine Daus
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Affective Events Theory and occupational health
  • Emotional labour and occupational health
  • Emotion regulation and occupational health
  • Emotional intelligence and occupational health
  • Positive- and negative-affect and occupational health
  • Discrete emotions and occupational health
  • Stress, coping, and emotions and occupational health
  • Humour and occupational health

Published Papers (18 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Servant Leadership in a Social Religious Organization: An Analysis of Work Engagement, Authenticity, and Spirituality at Work
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8542; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228542 - 18 Nov 2020
Viewed by 715
Abstract
Religious organizations represent a main part of the third sector and the social economy. Social faith-based institutions have some unique features that, in some respects, differentiate them from other entities, as they are characterized and defined not only by the services they provide, [...] Read more.
Religious organizations represent a main part of the third sector and the social economy. Social faith-based institutions have some unique features that, in some respects, differentiate them from other entities, as they are characterized and defined not only by the services they provide, but also by how they provide them. It is part of their mission to convey the values that prevail in their institutional culture while developing their activities, being attractive to those workers who identify with their values. From this point of view, a key element of these entities’ success is that their employees feel identified with their work so that they are engaged in the institution and its values. The style of leadership exercised in such organizations is critical to fostering these attitudes and their long-term survival. This paper aims to study the link between perceived servant leadership by followers and work engagement, as well as the mediating role of authenticity and spirituality at work in this relationship. To this end, 270 workers from a Spanish Catholic organization in the social sector were surveyed. These data were processed by PLS (partial least squares). The results show that a servant leadership style by itself does not directly promote work engagement among employees of the target organization. The engagement of these workers comes through two mediating variables: authenticity and spirituality at work. This study covers a gap in the literature because although there are studies arguing that a strategy of servant leadership is critical to these organizations, to our knowledge, they do not finish demonstrating the fundamental roles that attitudes of authenticity and spirituality at work play in the perception of this type of leadership, achieving greater work engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Work Environment and Occupational Stress on Safety Behavior of Individual Construction Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8304; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228304 - 10 Nov 2020
Viewed by 724
Abstract
This study was conducted to investigate how the work environment and psychological state influence construction workers’ perceptions and safety behaviors. Structural equation modeling was developed with five factors on the working environment (i.e., job demand, job control, job support, rewards, organizational justice, lack [...] Read more.
This study was conducted to investigate how the work environment and psychological state influence construction workers’ perceptions and safety behaviors. Structural equation modeling was developed with five factors on the working environment (i.e., job demand, job control, job support, rewards, organizational justice, lack of reward), two factors on workers’ psychological condition (i.e., depression and trait anxiety), and four factors on safety perception (i.e., safety motivation, safety knowledge, and safety compliance and participation behaviors). Sample data were collected from 399 construction workers working at 29 construction sites in South Korea and analyzed the direct and indirect effects between those factors. The results showed that construction workers’ safety compliance and participation behavior are related to their safety knowledge and motivation, and depression and trait anxiety were found to lower safety motivation, knowledge, and, eventually, safety behavior. Job demands, lack of job control, lack of reward, and lack of organizational justice negatively impacted safety behavior. In contrast, job support did not show a significant relationship with safety behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Motivation and Continuance Intention towards Online Instruction among Teachers during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Mediating Effect of Burnout and Technostress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218002 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3063
Abstract
In-service teachers have various emotional and motivational experiences that can influence their continuance intention towards online-only instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, as a significant stress factor for their workplace. Derived from the Self-Determination Theory (SDT), Job Demands–Resources Model (JD–R), and Technology Acceptance Model [...] Read more.
In-service teachers have various emotional and motivational experiences that can influence their continuance intention towards online-only instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, as a significant stress factor for their workplace. Derived from the Self-Determination Theory (SDT), Job Demands–Resources Model (JD–R), and Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), the present research model includes technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) self-efficacy (SE), intrinsic (IM) and extrinsic (EM) work motivation, and occupational stress (OS) (i.e., burnout and technostress which have been examined in tandem) as key dimensions to explain the better continuance intention among in-service teachers to use online-only instruction (CI). Data for the research model were collected from 980 in-service teachers during the COVID-19 outbreak between April and May 2020. Overall, the structural model explained 70% of the variance in teachers’ CI. Motivational practices were directly and indirectly linked through OS with CI. The findings showed that IM has the most directly significant effect on teachers’ CI, followed by TPK-SE, and OS as significant, but lower predictors. IM was positively associated with TPK-SE and negatively associated with EM. The results offered valuable insights into how motivation constructs were related to OS and to a better understanding online instruction in an unstable work context, in order to support teachers in coping during working remotely. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Emotional Intelligence and Psychosocial Risks on Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Nurses’ Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7998; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217998 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3704
Abstract
Nurses are exposed to psychosocial risks that can affect both psychological and physical health through stress. Prolonged stress at work can lead to burnout syndrome. An essential protective factor against psychosocial risks is emotional intelligence, which has been related to physical and psychological [...] Read more.
Nurses are exposed to psychosocial risks that can affect both psychological and physical health through stress. Prolonged stress at work can lead to burnout syndrome. An essential protective factor against psychosocial risks is emotional intelligence, which has been related to physical and psychological health, job satisfaction, increased job commitment, and burnout reduction. The present study aimed to analyze the effect of psychosocial risks and emotional intelligence on nurses’ health, well-being, burnout level, and job satisfaction during the rise and main peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. It is a cross-sectional study conducted on a convenience sample of 125 Spanish nurses. Multiple hierarchical linear regression models were calculated considering emotional intelligence levels, psychosocial demand factors (interpersonal conflict, lack of organizational justice, role conflict, and workload), social support and emotional work on burnout, job satisfaction, and nurses’ health. Finally, the moderating effect of emotional intelligence levels, psychosocial factors, social support, and emotional work on burnout, job satisfaction, and nurses’ health was calculated. Overall, this research data points to a protective effect of emotional intelligence against the adverse effects of psychosocial risks such as burnout, psychosomatic complaints, and a favorable effect on job satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Supervisors’ Active-Empathetic Listening as an Important Antecedent of Work Engagement
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7976; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217976 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Social support from supervisors is a job resource that has been found to be an important antecedent to work engagement. However, there is a knowledge gap in understanding one of the key features of social support—i.e., supervisors’ active-empathetic listening—and its relation to employees’ [...] Read more.
Social support from supervisors is a job resource that has been found to be an important antecedent to work engagement. However, there is a knowledge gap in understanding one of the key features of social support—i.e., supervisors’ active-empathetic listening—and its relation to employees’ work engagement. To bridge this gap, this study explores how supervisors’ active-empathetic listening is associated with employees’ work engagement. Using a national representative sample (N = 548), the results show that supervisors’ active-empathetic listening has a significant positive relationship with employee work engagement. Additionally, we show that active-empathetic listening does not affect all three dimensions of work engagement equally, with dedication being the most affected by supervisors’ active-empathetic listening. We argue that supportive leadership which uses conscious and active listening-centred communication is highly significant for employees’ work engagement. Therefore, we suggest that organisations experiment in training their supervisors in active-empathetic listening as part of a broader strategy to increase employees’ engagement at work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
Open AccessArticle
COVID-19 Pandemic and Death Anxiety in Security Forces in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7760; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217760 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1165
Abstract
The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which produces COVID-19 disease, has revealed to political and social circles a series of needs that have not yet been met. The workers of the State Security Forces and the Armed Forces have done an extraordinary [...] Read more.
The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which produces COVID-19 disease, has revealed to political and social circles a series of needs that have not yet been met. The workers of the State Security Forces and the Armed Forces have done an extraordinary job to try to alleviate the effects that the pandemic has had on the population and to return stability to the citizenry as much as possible. In this context, the following investigation is developed based on two objectives: (PO1) to know the level of anxiety in the face of death in these professionals; (PO2) to determine the predictive variables in the above-mentioned phenomenon. Professionals from all over Spain have participated in the study (n = 2079). From a quantitative perspective, a questionnaire was developed from the Collet–Lester death anxiety scale. The results show a total level of 69.2% in the scale, as well as some higher levels about the fear of death of others (82.1%) and the fear of the process of dying of others (78.2%). On the other hand, from the binary logistic regressions, four variables are evidenced that condition the risk of suffering death anxiety: (a) certainty of needing psychological treatment in the future; (b) absence of Individual Protection Equipment (PPE); (c) high levels of Emotional Exhaustion; (d) high levels of depersonalization—these last two come from the Maslach and Jackson Burnout scale. These data show a need for training and intervention in the emotional and psychological demands of the professionals of the Armed Forces and State Security Forces, as well as the obligation to develop a continuous dialogue with the institutions they represent to foster the feeling of belonging to them. It is essential, regardless of the serious consequences that the virus has caused, to understand the psychosocial and emotional demands of enforcement agents and to improve their occupational health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Not All Emotional Demands Are the Same: Emotional Demands from Clients’ or Co-Workers’ Relations Have Different Associations with Well-Being in Service Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7738; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217738 - 22 Oct 2020
Viewed by 600
Abstract
There has been an increased interest in the study of emotional demands (ED) at work and its impact on workers’ well-being. However, ED have been conceptualized as a unitary concept, focused on interactions with clients, and excluding other potential sources of ED at [...] Read more.
There has been an increased interest in the study of emotional demands (ED) at work and its impact on workers’ well-being. However, ED have been conceptualized as a unitary concept, focused on interactions with clients, and excluding other potential sources of ED at work. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to explore the relation between ED from different relational sources (clients/patients/customers and colleagues, supervisors, and employees) and service workers’ exhaustion and engagement. Cross-sectional data from a sample of 2742 service workers were analysed using structural equation modelling. Results showed that ED from both sources (clients and colleagues) were associated with more emotional exhaustion, particularly if dealing with clients was not an integrated part of the role. Further, ED from clients’ relations were negatively associated with engagement for managers with staff responsibility, but positively for managers without staff responsibility. We also found moderating effects of psychosocial safety climate (PSC), whereby ED had the strongest effect on emotional exhaustion when PSC was low. This study suggests that different relational sources of ED at work have a different impact on employees’ well-being. Strategies that promote a reduction of extra-role ED, and the development of a PSC in the organization, could therefore offer possible solutions to promote employees’ psychological well-being and motivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Service Employee Resilience on Emotional Labor: Double-Mediation of Person–Job Fit and Work Engagement
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7198; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197198 - 01 Oct 2020
Viewed by 755
Abstract
This study examined the effect of service employees’ resilience on deep acting in the job demands–resources model (JD-R model). It set and verified person–job fit and work engagement as double-mediation factors between service employees’ resilience and deep acting. To accomplish this, surveys targeting [...] Read more.
This study examined the effect of service employees’ resilience on deep acting in the job demands–resources model (JD-R model). It set and verified person–job fit and work engagement as double-mediation factors between service employees’ resilience and deep acting. To accomplish this, surveys targeting service employees working in the retail finance industry in Korea were administered. The analysis showed that resilience significantly increased person–job fit, and person–job fit improved work engagement. Additionally, it showed that work engagement improved deep acting. With regard to the double-mediation effect, the direct effect of resilience on deep acting was not statistically significant, but the double-mediation effect through person–job fit and work engagement was significant. In other words, person–job fit and work engagement fully mediated the relationship between resilience and deep acting. Additionally, person–job fit alone did not mediate the relationship between resilience and deep acting, but the independent mediation effect of work engagement was significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Ain’t Too Proud to Beg! Effects of Leader’s Use of Pride on Groups
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7146; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197146 - 29 Sep 2020
Viewed by 509
Abstract
Studies of discrete pride in the workplace are both few and on the rise. We examined what has, to date, been unstudied, namely the impact that a leader’s expressions of authentic and hubristic pride can have on the followers at that moment, and [...] Read more.
Studies of discrete pride in the workplace are both few and on the rise. We examined what has, to date, been unstudied, namely the impact that a leader’s expressions of authentic and hubristic pride can have on the followers at that moment, and on their attitudes regarding their task, leader, and group. Students working in groups building Lego structures rated their perceived leader regarding expressions of pride, both authentic and hubristic. Students who perceived the leader as expressing more authentic pride rated the task, group (satisfaction and cohesion), and leader more positively, while the reverse was generally true for perceptions of expressions of hubristic pride. We found these effects both at the individual level and at the group level. We also predicted and found moderation for the type of task worked on, creative or detailed. Implications abound for leader emotional labor and emotion management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Does Happiness Launch More Businesses? Affect, Gender, and Entrepreneurial Intention
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186908 - 21 Sep 2020
Viewed by 612
Abstract
In one of the first studies to examine how positive affect, negative affect, gender, and gender roles interact with entrepreneurial intention, we conducted an online survey of 849 adults from the western, midwestern, and southern regions of the United States. A higher positive [...] Read more.
In one of the first studies to examine how positive affect, negative affect, gender, and gender roles interact with entrepreneurial intention, we conducted an online survey of 849 adults from the western, midwestern, and southern regions of the United States. A higher positive affect was associated with greater intention to start a business, however, lower levels of negative affect were not. As in previous studies, women showed less entrepreneurial intention than men, however, the presence of positive affect had a larger positive impact on women’s entrepreneurial intention than men’s. Contrary to expectations, acceptance of traditional gender roles interacted with entrepreneurial intention such that women’s entrepreneurial intention increased as their support of traditional gender roles increased, and for men, entrepreneurial intention decreased slightly as acceptance of traditional gender roles increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Work–Family Conflict, Emotional Responses, Workplace Deviance, and Well-Being among Construction Professionals: A Sequential Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6883; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186883 - 21 Sep 2020
Viewed by 674
Abstract
Given the dynamic, complex, and highly demanding project environment, construction professionals are particularly likely to experience a high level of work–family conflict. Taking an emotional resource perspective and on the basis of affective events theory, this study tested negative affect and emotional exhaustion [...] Read more.
Given the dynamic, complex, and highly demanding project environment, construction professionals are particularly likely to experience a high level of work–family conflict. Taking an emotional resource perspective and on the basis of affective events theory, this study tested negative affect and emotional exhaustion as sequential mediators between two directions of work–family conflict and workplace well-being or deviance behavior. The theoretical model was examined using data collected at two time points from 143 construction professionals through regression analysis and bootstrapping. The results indicate that work–family conflict was positively related to deviant behavior and negatively related to workplace well-being. The findings demonstrate that the mediation effects of emotional exhaustion between work–family conflict and workplace well-being or deviant behavior were significant and that the sequential mediating effects of negative affect and emotional exhaustion in the relationship between work–family conflict and workplace well-being or deviant behavior were significant. Moreover, different impacts of work interference with family and family interference with work on job-related attitudes and behavior were observed. These findings highlight the importance of emotional experience to understand the negative impact of work–family conflict in the temporary project context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Association between Presenteeism, Psychosocial Aspects of Work and Common Mental Disorders among Nursing Personnel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6758; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186758 - 16 Sep 2020
Viewed by 667
Abstract
Presenteeism is the term used to describe going in to work even with a health problem. The phenomenon has been identified as one prior factor in sickness absence and, accordingly, the better it is understood, the better will be the prevention strategies. This [...] Read more.
Presenteeism is the term used to describe going in to work even with a health problem. The phenomenon has been identified as one prior factor in sickness absence and, accordingly, the better it is understood, the better will be the prevention strategies. This study aimed to examine the mediating role of presenteeism (the ability to concentrate on work and to complete work despite a health problem) in the association between psychosocial factors at work and common mental disorders (CMD). This cross-sectional study included 1218 nursing personnel at a public hospital in Brazil. Structural equation modelling was performed. The sample comprised mostly women (85.4%), and the mean age was 44.1 (SD = 11.3; range: 24–70) years. Prevalence of presenteeism was 32.8%. Among presenteeist workers (n = 400), a relationship was observed between presenteeism and higher CMD scores. Furthermore, being able to concentrate on work even with a health problem mediated the relationship between social support and CMD and between psychological demands and CMD. Working when sick impairs both the work and the worker’s health. Interventions designed to improve working conditions and interpersonal relations can be effective strategies against presenteeism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Inclusive Talent Development Model on Turnover Intention of New Generation Employees: The Mediation of Work Passion
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6054; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176054 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
The high turnover rate of new generation employees is becoming an increasingly important issue for business and academia. Based on self-determination theory and conservation of resource theory, our study explores the impact of the inclusive talent development model on the turnover intention of [...] Read more.
The high turnover rate of new generation employees is becoming an increasingly important issue for business and academia. Based on self-determination theory and conservation of resource theory, our study explores the impact of the inclusive talent development model on the turnover intention of new generation employees and the mediating role of work passion. Based on the questionnaire of 290 new generation employees’ data from China, after common method biases and reliability and validity tests, we used SPSS, Mplus and bootstrapping for empirical analysis. The result showed that the inclusive talent development model includes the diversified talent team construction, rational tolerance of employee’s opinions and failures, emphasis on employee’s training, emphasis on fairness and win–win and emphasis on employee’s advantages. The work passion has been divided into harmonious passion and obsessive passion. Among them, rational tolerance of employee’s opinions and failures, emphasis on employee’s training and emphasis on fairness and win–win have a significant positive impact on harmonious passion. Emphasis on fairness and win–win and emphasis on employee’s advantages have negative correlation with obsessive passion. The employee’s harmonious passion is significantly negatively correlated with the turnover intention and the obsessive passion is significantly positively correlated with the turnover intention. In addition, the harmonious passion plays a mediating role between rational tolerance of employee’s opinions and failures, emphasis on employee’s training, emphasis on fairness and win–win and employee’s turnover intention, while the obsessive passion plays a mediating role between emphasis on fairness and win–win and emphasis on employee’s advantages and employee’s turnover intention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Examining How Ambidextrous Leadership Relates to Affective Commitment and Workplace Deviance Behavior of Employees: The Moderating Role of Supervisor–Subordinate Exchange Guanxi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155500 - 30 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 916
Abstract
How to regulate employee conduct and engage them in high performance works actively and continuously has always been the important topic for organizations. Based on affective events theory and social exchange theory, a moderated mediating model was constructed with the affective commitment as [...] Read more.
How to regulate employee conduct and engage them in high performance works actively and continuously has always been the important topic for organizations. Based on affective events theory and social exchange theory, a moderated mediating model was constructed with the affective commitment as mediator and the supervisor–subordinate exchange guanxi as moderator. Regression analyses and conditional indirect effects were tested by SPSS and PROCESS with 374 matched supervisor–subordinate pairs. The paper explores the moderated mechanism of supervisor-subordinate guanxi to the chain of “ambidextrous leadership–employee’s affective commitment–workplace deviance behavior.” The results showed that the affective commitment mediated the effect between ambidextrous leadership and employees’ workplace deviance behavior, and supervisor–subordinate exchange guanxi moderated the relationship between ambidextrous leadership and employees’ workplace deviance behavior but also moderated the mediating effect of affective commitment. The results have significances to improve human resource management practices and reduce the workplace deviance behavior of employees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
How Employee’s Leadership Potential Leads to Leadership Ostracism Behavior: The Mediating Role of Envy, and the Moderating Role of Political Skills
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3080; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093080 - 28 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 955
Abstract
Recently, research on the leadership potential of employees has gradually attracted the attention of scholars. However, further exploration is required to better understand the upward influence of employee’s leadership potential on their leaders. This study examined the mechanisms behind the impact of employee’s [...] Read more.
Recently, research on the leadership potential of employees has gradually attracted the attention of scholars. However, further exploration is required to better understand the upward influence of employee’s leadership potential on their leaders. This study examined the mechanisms behind the impact of employee’s leadership potential on leadership ostracism behavior. Moreover, the mediating role of leader’s envy and the moderating role of employee’s political skills in the relationship between employee’s leadership potential and leadership ostracism behavior were investigated. The results of an empirical analysis of 221 employee–leader pairs, studied over multiple periods, are as follows: employee’s leadership potential had a significant positive impact on leader’s envy and leadership ostracism behavior; leader’s envy had a significant positive impact on leadership ostracism behavior; and leader’s envy mediated the relationship between leadership potential and leadership ostracism behavior. In addition, employee’s political skills negatively moderated the indirect effect of leadership potential on leadership ostracism behavior through leader’s envy. The leadership potential of employees with more political skills appeared to have less influence on organizational ostracism via leader’s envy. This study explored the “dark-side” of employee’s leadership potential by understanding its impact on their leaders; the findings have theoretical and practical significance for companies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 942
Abstract
Frontline managers have many responsibilities and often suffer from emotional exhaustion. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research proposes and examines a cognitive–affective dual mediation model to explain how frontline managers’ sense of power affects their emotional exhaustion through managerial self-efficacy (cognitive [...] Read more.
Frontline managers have many responsibilities and often suffer from emotional exhaustion. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research proposes and examines a cognitive–affective dual mediation model to explain how frontline managers’ sense of power affects their emotional exhaustion through managerial self-efficacy (cognitive path) and affective commitment (affective path). A cross-sectional study design was employed, and the theoretical model was tested using a three-wave survey among 227 on-the-job Master of Business Administration (MBA) students (52.86% male) in China, who serve as frontline managers in different kinds of organization. The regression and bootstrapping analysis results showed that the frontline managers’ sense of power was significantly negatively related to emotional exhaustion. In other words, the more powerful they felt, the less exhausted they felt. Furthermore, having a sense of power enhanced managerial self-efficacy, which mitigated emotional exhaustion. Sense of power also boosted frontline managers’ affective commitment, alleviating emotional exhaustion. We conclude with a discussion of this study’s theoretical and practical contributions and future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Bridging the Gap between Authentic Leadership and Employees Communal Relationships through Trust
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010250 - 30 Dec 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1678
Abstract
Authentic leadership has emerged as a positive relational-leadership approach that has gained the attention of academicians and practitioners by stimulating a healthy work environment. This study examined the direct influence of authentic leadership on employees’ communal relationships. In addition, the study examined the [...] Read more.
Authentic leadership has emerged as a positive relational-leadership approach that has gained the attention of academicians and practitioners by stimulating a healthy work environment. This study examined the direct influence of authentic leadership on employees’ communal relationships. In addition, the study examined the mediating role of affective- and cognitive-based trust on these relationships. We adopted a cross-sectional study design and collected data from 200 employees working in the private banking sector in Pakistan. The findings indicated that authentic leadership was positively correlated with communal employee relationships. In addition, both affective- and cognitive-based trust were found to have a positive mediating effect on the relationship between authentic leadership and communal employee relationships. The practical implications, limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
An Eye for an Eye? Third Parties’ Silence Reactions to Peer Abusive Supervision: The Mediating Role of Workplace Anxiety, and the Moderating Role of Core Self-Evaluation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245027 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1262
Abstract
Currently, a few scholars have studied the spillover effects of abusive supervision from third parties’ perspective. However, these limited researches mainly focus on third parties’ explicit behavior response to peer abusive supervision, ignoring their implicit reactions (e.g., silence) and the emotional mechanism among [...] Read more.
Currently, a few scholars have studied the spillover effects of abusive supervision from third parties’ perspective. However, these limited researches mainly focus on third parties’ explicit behavior response to peer abusive supervision, ignoring their implicit reactions (e.g., silence) and the emotional mechanism among it. To fill the above gaps, drawing on affective events theory, we construct a theoretical model that explains the relationship among peer abusive supervision, third parties’ workplace anxiety, third parties’ silence, and third parties’ core self-evaluation. Multi-wave data from 283 front-line employees (57% male and 43% female; 57.2% are 30 years old and below, 31.1% are 31–40 years old and 11.7% are over 40 years old), who come from eight real estate and insurance companies in China, were used to support our framework. In particular, our empirical results indicated that peer abusive supervision was positively related to third parties’ silence, among which workplace anxiety played a partial mediating role. In addition, third parties’ core self-evaluation moderated the relationship between peer abusive supervision and silence, meanwhile, the mediating role of workplace anxiety. Specifically, the effect of peer abusive supervision on workplace anxiety, and the mediating effect of workplace anxiety, was weaker when the third parties’ core self-evaluation was higher rather than lower. The results contribute to both theory and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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