Special Issue "Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Catherine Daus
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, School of Education, Health and Human Behavior, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, USA
Interests: emotions in workplace; emotional intelligence; emotional labor; discrete emotions (pride in particular); humor in workplace; stress and burnout; work-life balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue to bring together interdisciplinary perspectives on emotions and occupational health across a wide range of health, life, and social sciences, in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.
Emotions in organizational life have become increasingly acknowledged as being critical, both academically and practically, particularly in the last two decades. Researchers and practitioners have sought to extend our understanding and predictability of work life beyond a “rational, cognitive” framework. Theories and constructs, such as affective events theory, positive and negative affectivity (PA/NA), emotional labour, and emotional intelligence, have provided foundational structures upon which to build theory and practice regarding emotions in the workplace. In addition, discrete emotions in the workplace, such as anger, pride, and joy, provide unique information above and beyond broad affect and emotion. In this Issue, we seek to provide a series of empirical and theoretical papers that specifically showcase the role emotions and affect-related constructs play in occupational health.
This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to understanding the complexity of emotions in the workplace, and occupational health. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Catherine Daus
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Affective Events Theory and occupational health
  • Emotional labour and occupational health
  • Emotion regulation and occupational health
  • Emotional intelligence and occupational health
  • Positive- and negative-affect and occupational health
  • Discrete emotions and occupational health
  • Stress, coping, and emotions and occupational health
  • Humour and occupational health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
Frontline managers have many responsibilities and often suffer from emotional exhaustion. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research proposes and examines a cognitive–affective dual mediation model to explain how frontline managers’ sense of power affects their emotional exhaustion through managerial self-efficacy (cognitive [...] Read more.
Frontline managers have many responsibilities and often suffer from emotional exhaustion. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research proposes and examines a cognitive–affective dual mediation model to explain how frontline managers’ sense of power affects their emotional exhaustion through managerial self-efficacy (cognitive path) and affective commitment (affective path). A cross-sectional study design was employed, and the theoretical model was tested using a three-wave survey among 227 on-the-job Master of Business Administration (MBA) students (52.86% male) in China, who serve as frontline managers in different kinds of organization. The regression and bootstrapping analysis results showed that the frontline managers’ sense of power was significantly negatively related to emotional exhaustion. In other words, the more powerful they felt, the less exhausted they felt. Furthermore, having a sense of power enhanced managerial self-efficacy, which mitigated emotional exhaustion. Sense of power also boosted frontline managers’ affective commitment, alleviating emotional exhaustion. We conclude with a discussion of this study’s theoretical and practical contributions and future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
Open AccessArticle
Bridging the Gap between Authentic Leadership and Employees Communal Relationships through Trust
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010250 - 30 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Authentic leadership has emerged as a positive relational-leadership approach that has gained the attention of academicians and practitioners by stimulating a healthy work environment. This study examined the direct influence of authentic leadership on employees’ communal relationships. In addition, the study examined the [...] Read more.
Authentic leadership has emerged as a positive relational-leadership approach that has gained the attention of academicians and practitioners by stimulating a healthy work environment. This study examined the direct influence of authentic leadership on employees’ communal relationships. In addition, the study examined the mediating role of affective- and cognitive-based trust on these relationships. We adopted a cross-sectional study design and collected data from 200 employees working in the private banking sector in Pakistan. The findings indicated that authentic leadership was positively correlated with communal employee relationships. In addition, both affective- and cognitive-based trust were found to have a positive mediating effect on the relationship between authentic leadership and communal employee relationships. The practical implications, limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
An Eye for an Eye? Third Parties’ Silence Reactions to Peer Abusive Supervision: The Mediating Role of Workplace Anxiety, and the Moderating Role of Core Self-Evaluation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245027 - 10 Dec 2019
Abstract
Currently, a few scholars have studied the spillover effects of abusive supervision from third parties’ perspective. However, these limited researches mainly focus on third parties’ explicit behavior response to peer abusive supervision, ignoring their implicit reactions (e.g., silence) and the emotional mechanism among [...] Read more.
Currently, a few scholars have studied the spillover effects of abusive supervision from third parties’ perspective. However, these limited researches mainly focus on third parties’ explicit behavior response to peer abusive supervision, ignoring their implicit reactions (e.g., silence) and the emotional mechanism among it. To fill the above gaps, drawing on affective events theory, we construct a theoretical model that explains the relationship among peer abusive supervision, third parties’ workplace anxiety, third parties’ silence, and third parties’ core self-evaluation. Multi-wave data from 283 front-line employees (57% male and 43% female; 57.2% are 30 years old and below, 31.1% are 31–40 years old and 11.7% are over 40 years old), who come from eight real estate and insurance companies in China, were used to support our framework. In particular, our empirical results indicated that peer abusive supervision was positively related to third parties’ silence, among which workplace anxiety played a partial mediating role. In addition, third parties’ core self-evaluation moderated the relationship between peer abusive supervision and silence, meanwhile, the mediating role of workplace anxiety. Specifically, the effect of peer abusive supervision on workplace anxiety, and the mediating effect of workplace anxiety, was weaker when the third parties’ core self-evaluation was higher rather than lower. The results contribute to both theory and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
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