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Article

The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model

by and *
Business School, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207
Received: 14 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 21 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
Frontline managers have many responsibilities and often suffer from emotional exhaustion. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research proposes and examines a cognitive–affective dual mediation model to explain how frontline managers’ sense of power affects their emotional exhaustion through managerial self-efficacy (cognitive path) and affective commitment (affective path). A cross-sectional study design was employed, and the theoretical model was tested using a three-wave survey among 227 on-the-job Master of Business Administration (MBA) students (52.86% male) in China, who serve as frontline managers in different kinds of organization. The regression and bootstrapping analysis results showed that the frontline managers’ sense of power was significantly negatively related to emotional exhaustion. In other words, the more powerful they felt, the less exhausted they felt. Furthermore, having a sense of power enhanced managerial self-efficacy, which mitigated emotional exhaustion. Sense of power also boosted frontline managers’ affective commitment, alleviating emotional exhaustion. We conclude with a discussion of this study’s theoretical and practical contributions and future research directions. View Full-Text
Keywords: affective commitment; emotional exhaustion; managerial self-efficacy; sense of power; survey study affective commitment; emotional exhaustion; managerial self-efficacy; sense of power; survey study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, S.; Zhou, H. The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2207. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207

AMA Style

Liu S, Zhou H. The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2207. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Song, and Hao Zhou. 2020. "The Role of Sense of Power in Alleviating Emotional Exhaustion in Frontline Managers: A Dual Mediation Model" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2207. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072207

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